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Kitty Wallis
04-20-2004, 08:14 PM
About 40"x28" With a Createx Pure Pigment underpainting.

Deborah Secor
04-20-2004, 08:21 PM
I ADORE the colors in this water. I think your use of rich darks is one of the things that most impresses me.

I'm teaching a workshop on water and reflections on Monday and this is inspirational! Would you mind if I printed it to show them the possibilities with water? Hm, maybe not--only if you don't mind...

Deborah

SweetBabyJ
04-20-2004, 08:23 PM
Sure Dee- just crush their little hopes from the start.

Magnificent- what control- perfect!

Kitty Wallis
04-20-2004, 08:23 PM
Go right ahead. I like your use of it. Thanks for your comments on my 2 new threads.

I ADORE the colors in this water. I think your use of rich darks is one of the things that most impresses me.

I'm teaching a workshop on water and reflections on Monday and this is inspirational! Would you mind if I printed it to show them the possibilities with water? Hm, maybe not--only if you don't mind...

Deborah

Dyin
04-20-2004, 08:58 PM
Kitty, you really do have an exquisite way with color application...hat's off to you.

PaulaCT
04-20-2004, 09:48 PM
What everyone else said.

Plus, I like the way the water fans out in the swan's wake; you really get a sense that the water has weight, and that the swan is gliding through it creating a swell.

Do you mind sharing how you approach a complex subject like this? Do you break it down by working the paper one area at a time, or do you work all over the canvas? (I mean, the Wallis paper. :p )

PaulaCT

Mikki Petersen
04-20-2004, 10:36 PM
I'm with Paula...how do you go about such intricate water scenes? I sure wish my eyes saw all those different colors in things. You are truly a master of water!

Khadres
04-20-2004, 10:41 PM
(Repeat worshipful chant here!) This is too cool! This one HAD to be tough to control the values on with the lighter palette? Fabulous work! I'd just love to see you DO one of these big ones! I can't even imagine how one would go about it!

Kitty Wallis
04-21-2004, 12:54 AM
In answer to the questions about painting water.

I have two main guiding thoughts I hold in my mind while I paint water:

Remember the plane of the surface, it's Exact angle. Never break the plane, make each ripple and reflection and shadow with full recognition of the plane.

TRACK every form of every ripple, highlight and shadow; every reflection, it's relationship to the reflected object; every shadow, the direction of light and the object shadowing the water, the changing color of the ripples, reflections as the shadows affect them. Tracking can be done without meticulously drawing each piece, but by tracking in the mind as the hand moves loosely.

Also, the color palette of the water and it's elements is different than the color palette of the dry land, the objects not under water. The color of the water effects all the colors in the water, the ripples, the reflections and the shadows.

Paula, I work all over the paper, first with a simple underpainting, then as I bring all the painting along at the same rate with pastel.

Sooz, I have a big board on my easel and it's Very stable. My easel is just 2 2x4's fastened in the ceiling and the floor, absolutely vertically. On those is screwed 3/4 " Melamine. I can do a 4'x6' vertically or horizantally. I do not tilt my easel at all. And I have a roof gutter as a trough to catch the dust.

Thank you all for your thoughts and questions.

E-J
04-21-2004, 03:55 AM
Lovely painting, Kitty! So much activity, variety, colour and liveliness in the strokes you've used for the water - and yet not only does it not look 'messy' but you still draw my eye back to the swan.

TRACK every form of every ripple, highlight and shadow; every reflection, it's relationship to the reflected object; every shadow, the direction of light and the object shadowing the water, the changing color of the ripples, reflections as the shadows affect them. Tracking can be done without meticulously drawing each piece, but by tracking in the mind as the hand moves loosely.

This sounds like so much information to hold in one's head ... mine would explode! It is probably one of those techniques you can describe to someone else but can't strictly 'teach' them to do ... like bending a note on a harmonica ... how to make water bend convincingly ...

Khadres
04-21-2004, 08:07 AM
Just as an aside....I got my roll of Wallis yesterday. I had to have my daughter help me get it out of the packaging and when we finally got it uncovered, she lightly ran her fingers over it, her eyes lit up, and all she could say was, "Oooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!"

She wants a sample piece to try with her Prismacolor pencils and Art Stix!

Kathryn Wilson
04-21-2004, 08:47 AM
TRACK every form of every ripple, highlight and shadow; every reflection, it's relationship to the reflected object; every shadow, the direction of light and the object shadowing the water, the changing color of the ripples, reflections as the shadows affect them. Tracking can be done without meticulously drawing each piece, but by tracking in the mind as the hand moves loosely.

Hi Kitty - "tracking" sounds like a technique I haven't heard of before - can you explain further how you track something. I have a difficult time doing this subject because I lose my place in the reference photo as I look back and forth to the photo and my easel. (same thing happens with flower petals, so I started #'ing them - :D )

binkie
04-21-2004, 01:12 PM
Ohhhhhhhhh! Your water is just incredible!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

bnoonan
04-21-2004, 03:33 PM
Kitty - ONce again another beauty. Did you take workshops on painting water or did it come naturally to you? I love the way each little ripple has a perfect shape and those colors and shapes just repeat throughout the piece. It's got great movement.

Love it! Barb

Kitty Wallis
04-21-2004, 06:04 PM
Hi Kitty - "tracking" sounds like a technique I haven't heard of before - can you explain further how you track something. I have a difficult time doing this subject because I lose my place in the reference photo as I look back and forth to the photo and my easel. (same thing happens with flower petals, so I started #'ing them - :D )

Have you done contour drawing? Drawing without looking at the paper, but by moving slowly along the line as you look at that same point on the subject, no leaping ahead. That's tracking. Knowing exactly where you are in the image, EXACTLY, so that your mark is infused with the sense of the form you are drawing. After some practice you can draw confidently without looking at your work. My marks are a combination of contour drawing and gesture drawing.

The best reference book I know to study these concepts is Nicholiades' 'The Natural Way To Draw' It's written as a text book and he strongly suggests it be used that way. Don't look ahead until you finish each assignment. I have used it while teaching groups figure drawing and there were breakthroughs all over the room as we went through the weeks.

Kitty Wallis
04-21-2004, 06:06 PM
Kitty - ONce again another beauty. Did you take workshops on painting water or did it come naturally to you? I love the way each little ripple has a perfect shape and those colors and shapes just repeat throughout the piece. It's got great movement. Love it! Barb

No, I never took a workshop , I did go to art school but I didn't get this there. I got the respect for practice that I needed, tho. This ability with water came after 25 years of doing portraits from life.

Kitty Wallis
04-21-2004, 06:09 PM
Just as an aside....I got my roll of Wallis yesterday. I had to have my daughter help me get it out of the packaging and when we finally got it uncovered, she lightly ran her fingers over it, her eyes lit up, and all she could say was, "Oooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!"

She wants a sample piece to try with her Prismacolor pencils and Art Stix!

I predict she'll love it.

Deborah Secor
04-21-2004, 06:15 PM
I haven't studied the book you mentioned, though it sounds great, but I do know that I've 'discovered' what you mention in my painting. One time a student remarked that I don't look at the painting as I do it. I never thought about it, but since then I've relized that's somewhat true. I've often thougth I should write a book titled 'Painting Without Looking'!

Deborah

Kathryn Wilson
04-21-2004, 06:32 PM
I suspected it was something like that - I've heard of Nicholiades' book, but I've never seen a copy of it. I imagine an interesting thought process of doing what the eye sees. Not sure I could become fond of it as I really enjoy watching the color go on the paper and it's interplay with other colors - BUT, not having the book or watched it being done, I'll have to reserve that opinion.

I see you are coming to North Carolina next year - better save my bucks!

prestonsega
04-21-2004, 07:05 PM
Kitty, I am, as is everyone else here taken back by this work. The area that attracts me the most if the lower picture plane...your use of purples, blues, and yellow/golds are beautiful....this section could be cropped out and stand on its own as a beautiful painting ( I am in no way suggestion you get our the trusty swiss army knife!!!!!!) LOL thanks for sharing and tutoring!!

Kitty Wallis
04-21-2004, 09:46 PM
Thanks to you all for your comments.

Stoy Jones
04-21-2004, 10:57 PM
No, I never took a workshop , I did go to art school but I didn't get this there. I got the respect for practice that I needed, tho. This ability with water came after 25 years of doing portraits from life.

I believe it was Sargeant who wrote a student, insisting him to have command of his tools of the chosen medium in order to paint well. Very simple, but we all tend to forget the fruits of just plain hard work! 25 years of practice and painting from life really did you wonders. The swan is beautiful, but the water is what really draws me into your piece! Very inspiring work!

Stoy

Artaholic
04-22-2004, 01:20 AM
Incredable :clap: :clap: