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heh
04-09-2004, 06:10 PM
you show me yours, i’ll show you mine :D

what are you guys reading?
what have you read?
what was it about?
was it any good?
my eyes are hungry
share the book love please:D

VieSaintSo
04-09-2004, 06:31 PM
Heh,
Great idea...
rigt now am re-reading Beach Music by Pat Conroy
its about life, family,... births of turtles,...new love.... grivieng....f....up family and how to accept them...lost love.....hope....
to me its a must read so so well written.Love the guy...
Am also reading "Cleopatra" wow! :evil: what a wench she was...in a good way!
Great idea for a thread, i also have hungry eyes and mind. :)

Tooth
04-09-2004, 07:14 PM
i'm a Kurt Vonnegut addict these days. Am currently readin Sirens of Titan. It's hard to say exactly what its about, but it involves a rich man flying to Mars, where there is a giant army preparing for a battle against Earth. Very funny as all Vonnegut books are, and I can't wait to see where it goes.

blkros
04-10-2004, 12:23 PM
Reading "Free as in Freedom" right now, a biography of Richard Stallman.
Also nibbling at "Beyond Fear", by Bruce Schneier, and "The Future of Ideas", by Lawrence Lessig.
Just finished "Heavy Weather" by Bruce Sterling, Not as good as "Island in the Net", or "Holy Fire", but better than "Zeitgeist".
Also just finished re-reading "My Name is Asher Lev", and "The Gift of Asher Lev" by Chaim Potok, two books that I highly recommend for artists.

jnet11
04-10-2004, 01:38 PM
I'm reading "Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors" by Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan, a book about the history of man, and how we can continue to evolve without killing ourselves with our technology

and

"New and Selected Poems 74-94" of Stephen Dunn ... wow. he's the man.

Those of us who think we know
the same secrets
are silent together most of the time,
for us there is eloquence
in desire, and for a while
when in love and exhausted
it's enough to nod like shy horses
and come together
in a quiet ceremony of tongues

it's in disappointment we look for words
to convince us
the spaces between stars are nothing
to worry about,
it's when those secrets burst
in that emptiness between our hearts
and the lumps in our throats.
And the words we find
are always insufficient, like love,
though they are often lovely
and all we have


- Stephen Dunn
*********************
so whatchoo readin heh?

heh
04-10-2004, 02:13 PM
hooray thank you all for sharing
all these things i’ve never read
it’s all being adding to my book list

i’ve read My Name is Asher Lev, that was a great one !

last week i got Sputnik Sweetheart by Haruki Murakami
and i stared to reread The Wind-up Bird Chronicles by him
i read it a couple years ago, and he’s just so fun
mental and exciting
awkward stories with surreal happenings
touching on the absolute realness of human love and longing

i'm usually flipping through a copy of The Lotus Sutra
its always strewn about somewhere within reach

someone :D sent me Black+Whiteley, Barry Dickens in search of Brett
a biography of sorts on one of my most favorite artists, Brett Whiteley
an australian that doesn’t get the recognition he should in this world

for about two months i’ve been flipping through Brett Whiteley by Sandra McGrath
i love it, such big beautiful photos and so many of them
can’t ever find books on him in the usa so i absolutely hoard them
when my little fingers get a hold of one

mame
04-10-2004, 03:25 PM
Haven't been able to get my mind settled enough to read fiction for a while. Thumbing through the following:

"Critical Aesthetics and Post Modernism", Paul Crowther
The first in a multi-volume series. Philosophy of art with consideration of the historical and conceptual relations of art within a context of social change. A bit of a yawner, not bad.

"African Rhythm and African Sensibility", John Miller Chernoff
Assertion - Africans rely on music to articulate their philosophical and religious heritage. Based on the author's personal experience of 5 years in Ghana learning the art of drumming.

"Me Talk Pretty One Day", David Sedaris. I love this guy. A laugh out-loud-er.

Re-reading from a college text, "Perspectives on Chinese Cinema, ed by Chris Berry

sue ellen
04-10-2004, 03:54 PM
Currently on my bed side table is "Stillness Speaks" by Eckhart Tolle. I start and end each day with a random passage.
This book is endless.

Mame...David and Amy Sedaris are wicked funny! :D

TeAnne
04-10-2004, 11:52 PM
hooray thank you all for sharing
all these things i’ve never read
it’s all being adding to my book list

i’ve read My Name is Asher Lev, that was a great one !

last week i got Sputnik Sweetheart by Haruki Murakami
and i stared to reread The Wind-up Bird Chronicles by him
i read it a couple years ago, and he’s just so fun
mental and exciting
awkward stories with surreal happenings
touching on the absolute realness of human love and longing

i'm usually flipping through a copy of The Lotus Sutra
its always strewn about somewhere within reach

someone :D sent me Black+Whiteley, Barry Dickens in search of Brett
a biography of sorts on one of my most favorite artists, Brett Whiteley
an australian that doesn’t get the recognition he should in this world

for about two months i’ve been flipping through Brett Whiteley by Sandra McGrath
i love it, such big beautiful photos and so many of them
can’t ever find books on him in the usa so i absolutely hoard them
when my little fingers get a hold of one

I LOVE Brett's work :)

I'm into True Crime and Biographies.

blumoon
04-11-2004, 12:39 AM
Books are a passion of mine. Not so much into literature these days, which is unusual. Right now I am reading 'The Fiery Muse Creativity & The Spiritual Quest' by Teri Degler. I am still looking for one of my art reference books which I am always thumbing through: 'Regarding the Spiritual In Art' by Kandinsky, however it has mysteriously disappeared, and I know it never left the house. I have one cat who is a paper 7 cardboard shredder, and recently I discovered she had trained the other cat who is a feral, and learning the ways of living with humans, to do it as well. :evil: So perhaps I should just pick up another copy . . . then I might find it, in small pieces more than likely. Perhaps it is where the cats' mice, and missing socks go??? :D

lizzy
04-11-2004, 02:40 AM
read a little inferno getting ready for summer i have 3 copies
anything stephen brust to reign in hell
random weather reports that i myself predict controlled by the us
subtitles, numbers, tags, hormones, letters, bank accounts, numbers, school buses, howard stern, pornos and mentalities
um teachers pets

heh
04-14-2004, 10:53 AM
i don’t recommend Black+Whiteley
it’s terrible
i’ve never read anything so tragically useless


my list is growing, thanks guys !


blumoon: there is a free downloadable etext of Regarding the Spiritual In Art
it could hold you over until you get another
or be there forever in internet heaven
i’ll dig for the link

Spyderbabe
04-14-2004, 04:23 PM
"The Passion of Artemisia" by Sue Vreeland

"Recently rediscovered by art historians, and one of the few female post-Renaissance painters to achieve fame during her own era, Artemisia Gentileschi led a remarkably "modern" life."

I have to stop reading and google the internet so I can see each painting as Artemisia starts it in the book. Great fun.

kelly
04-15-2004, 11:19 AM
"The Wheel of Time"....Carlos Castaneda. Oh, Yeaaaaaaaa.

Collin
04-15-2004, 12:28 PM
Just recently read "The Corrections" by Jonathan Franzen, it is a great read. I have also been reading a lot from Arturo Perez-Reverte and Nick Tosches. I am going to be reading some Hermann Hesse, Franz Kafka, and Thomas Mann once school is out.

sue ellen
04-15-2004, 05:27 PM
"Ishmael" by Daniel Quinn is a favorite of mine and
I just re-read "The Story of B" (also by Quinn)

heh
07-17-2004, 11:05 AM
less than 50 percent of americans read for pleasure
excluding books that are forced upon them for work or school
that’s too depressing

but the state of literature is also poor
we need novels with the charm of good poetry
that are absolutely drowned in great storytelling


i’m going to the bookstore today
armed with a few titles i took from the list here
also looking to get more Calvino and Murakami
(i’m author loyal, what can i say?)

read The Life of Pi by Yann Martel a while ago
it was great

arourapope
07-17-2004, 11:20 AM
I'm reading The Sacred Bee by Hilda M. Ransome. Bzzzzzzz :)

blkros
07-17-2004, 11:29 AM
I'm (re)reading Trouble on Triton by Samuel R Delaney. (Got a new edition.)
Any book by him is a wonder to read--even if you don't like SF--he's a true artist (of literature).
Waiting on a couple of books on Jasper Johns, and Leonardo's Nephew: Essays on Art and Artists by James Fenton, from Amazon. Should finish the Delaney book just in time (they're due here Monday.) :D
Leafing through a Greek Mythology book in the off times, also.

mame
07-17-2004, 12:08 PM
Bilk

Check out Powell's Books (located in Portland, Oregon). They have or can get EVERYTHING - will search/locate titles for you, have a huge used selection, etc.
They are ( I think they still are) purported to be the largest book store in........the US? In the world? Maybe just in Mandan, ND. I forget.

Any way, plug "Powell's Books into Google.

blkros
07-17-2004, 12:20 PM
Auntie
I like Powells, too, but The big A had the books cheaper, and free shipping, so they won this time. :D

And my local book store can usually get anything that I want, but Amazon could do this faster (and cheaper, by a good margin--art books are so freaking expensive) for me. Usually I shop Amazon, and oorder through the local bookstore. I must admit that I do use Border's, too--esp. for magazines, since the distributor for my local store doesn't carry many of the ones I like.:( :D

Tamana
07-17-2004, 12:28 PM
Okay one more and I'm REALLY out this time!! lol I have to get to a framers with a treasure near my heart!!

Comparison Eastern religious studies for me here: I just finished the Baghavad-Gita and the Hidden Glory of India by Steven J. Rosen! The latter is incredible and I would HIGHLY recommend to anyone desiring to know about India. It's the MOST beautifully illustrated book I have EVER seen, and the pages are mini chapters regarding individual subjects that are indepth and concise in such remarkable brevity at the same time. Rosen is an incredible author.

Now off to the 'Science of Self Realization' & 'The Journey of Self Discovery'!!! Here both of those are highly recommended and excellent reads.

I'm reading The Sacred Bee by Hilda M. Ransome. Bzzzzzzz

!!

That's BzzZzzzZzz, isn't it? ;)

mame
07-17-2004, 12:29 PM
I'll meet you at the coffee bar at Borders. You buy. :)

"auntie"........I rest my case.

blkros
07-17-2004, 12:31 PM
I'll meet you at the coffee bar at Borders. You buy. :)

"auntie"........I rest my case.

Sounds like a plan, but I know a better coffehouse close by. :D

PS "auntie" I only call you that because I love you so much (and you did choose Mame for a moniker). :music:

JustjoGA
07-17-2004, 12:39 PM
I read for pleasure... have been a reader since age 4.
I read mostly fiction... currently have 18 TBR (to be read) on my night stand... Since moving to GA I am reading Georgia authors who mostly write the way I imagine they speak... I also love almost everything Nora Roberts writes... BTW, I also work at the local county library, so it's like living in a smorgasbord...

heh
07-17-2004, 01:11 PM
Okay one more and I'm REALLY out this time!! lol I have to get to a framers with a treasure near my heart!!

Comparison Eastern religious studies for me here.......



if you haven't already read it you should check out Life of Pi
i think you'd love it
there is a bit of religion and zoology there
it is a very beautiful book


“After the ‘Hellos’ and the ‘Good days’, there was an awkward silence.
The priest broke it when he said, with pride in his voice, “Piscine is
a good Christian boy. I hope to see him join our choir soon.”

My parents, the pandit, and the imam looked surprised.

“You must be mistaken. He’s a good Muslim boy. He comes without fail
to Friday prayer, and his knowledge of the Holy Qur’an is coming along
nicely.” So said the imam.

My parents, the priest and the pandit looked incredulous.

The pandit spoke: “You’re both wrong. He is a good Hindu boy. I see him
all the time at the temple coming for darshan and performing puja.”

My parents, the imam, and the priest looked astounded.

“There is no mistake,” said the priest. “I know this boy. He is Piscine Molitor
Patel and he’s a Christian.”

“I know him too, and I tell you he’s a Muslim,” asserted the imam.

“Nonsense!” cried the pandit. “Piscine was born a Hindu, lives a Hindu
and will die a Hindu!”

The three wise men stared at each other, breathless and disbelieving.
Lord, avert their eyes from me, I whispered in my soul.

All eyes fell upon me.” (pg 66)


one of my favorite bits

hotpavementburnsmyft
07-17-2004, 01:41 PM
The Contortionists Handbook by Craig Clevenger

debi-d
07-17-2004, 01:55 PM
hey,
since I was a wee one I have loved the power of books, they can be life changing and life affirming. Nothing else can have the effect of a good book. They open doors to our creative centers, to worlds unknown and unseen.
right now I am reading the four agreements. by don miguel ruiz, it is a book where I can open it and what is on that page seems to be just what I needed to hear at that exact moment.
for example"making assumptions in our relationships is really asking for problems. Often we make the assumption that our partners know what we think. (pg 66)
just finished reading The power of Intention by Wayne Dwyer, found that to be another book of positive motivation, (Just what I need right now)
oh and I picked up the Bhagavas -gita asit is at a great book sale this summer its waiting my attention :rolleyes:
debi

Gareth
07-17-2004, 02:22 PM
Black Cross, Red Star. The Air War Over the Eastern Front. Volume 2. Resurgence. January - June 1942. Christer Bergstrom and Andrey Mikhilov.

Tamana
07-17-2004, 08:06 PM
Dena, it's now been bumped up to read #1! That excerpt made my heart weep; you have no idea. I mean that's exactly the place I'm standing in myself trying to answer gracefully under the pressure of 'surprised' 'incredulous' and astounded faces: I call it the 'everything' place; the place everybody wants to look from compartmentalized worlds for you to choose to step out into theirs. I have always believed that if you become; then you love; and become another; then you love another; and then another; and you love another; and so on....you can't HATE that which you understand. It is no threat. And to that I quote:

"everything
"if different
"is not so."

Bisco
07-17-2004, 08:27 PM
Perdido Street Station - China Miéville
Review (http://www.sfsite.com/07b/ps108.htm)

heh
07-17-2004, 09:02 PM
Dena, it's now been bumped up to read #1! That excerpt made my heart weep; you have no idea. I mean that's exactly the place I'm standing in myself trying to answer gracefully under the pressure of 'surprised' 'incredulous' and astounded faces: I call it the 'everything' place; the place everybody wants to look from compartmentalized worlds for you to choose to step out into theirs. I have always believed that if you become; then you love; and become another; then you love another; and then another; and you love another; and so on....you can't HATE that which you understand. It is no threat. And to that I quote:

"everything
"if different
"is not so."


good good
i thought of you with it, how it would be a good read since you’ve
been studying those religions for a good bit of time now
i know you’ll love it
especially the religious discovery bits , and his clever observations
“Bapu Gandhi said, ‘All religions are true,’ I just want to love God.”

the beginning says “this is a book that will make you believe in god”
it wont really, its more spiritual than religious, more personal than outward
and has a lot more to it than religion
its entirely non-threatening to other beliefs, not “preachy”
(that beginning bit is as preachy as it gets)
the best integration of religion into literature i’ve ever seen
it’s a funny and sad wonder
seriously one of those ones that has you rolling on the floor one page
and as soon as you catch your breath, has you in tears

mandragora
07-17-2004, 10:18 PM
The Flowers of Evil, Charles Baudelaire
a friend.. sent me this poem to cheer me up.. since then.. I have been reading the book.

The Albatross
Often, to amuse themselves, the crew of the ship
Would fell an albatross, the largest of sea birds,
Indolent companions of their trip
As they slide across the deep sea's bitters.

Scarcely had they dropped to the plank
Than these blue kings, maladroit and ashamed
Let their great white wings sink
Like an oar dragging under the water's plane.

The winged visitor, so awkward and weak!
So recently beautiful, now comic and ugly!
One sailor grinds a pipe into his beak,
Another, limping, mimics the infirm bird that once could fly.

The poet is like the prince of the clouds
Who haunts the storm and laughs at lightning.
He's exiled to the ground and its hooting crowds;
His giant wings prevent him from walking.

Tamana
07-17-2004, 10:24 PM
Appreciate it, Dena. Doing more downloading and listening than reading lately. I would fall asleep listening...

You have to dig and sometimes you don't before a link becomes apparant back to what you already know; and so forth; and so on...and so...

I believing that somewhere in history, beyond all the rules and regulations and blood spilled as man has carved yokes from the souls of those seeking, that there is a common thread that binds us all; and I've always felt that thread was love. I said this...somewhere, but, I can't remember where I said it; maybe here, but it's a shame that the average american fundamentalist views a Hindu as a 'cow worshipper' while their kinsmen starve...or those crazy bald people who wear orange sheets and hang out at 'Grateful Dead' concerts...

Ignorance (even from myself sometimes) never fails to astound me.

IrishEyez
07-18-2004, 01:08 AM
Being a college student once again-the last book I read was my Public Relations textbook. When I don't have to read-my last book was Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt.

pearlgirl
07-18-2004, 08:40 AM
Hmmmm...you all seem to be reading books I've never heard of and I'm an avid reader. Actually an avid reader trying to find an arty persona. Currently I have just read 'The Da Vinci Code' by Dan Brown. I somehow feel like this is sacrilege in this forum but it proved to be an interesting read to me and has inspired me to go on a search for ancient symbolism. I love history...as novice as I am!

mame
07-18-2004, 08:50 AM
Pearl Bailey -
Nothing is sacred.

You might enjoy:
"Theories and Documents of Contemporary Art. A Sourcebook of Artist' Writings"
Edited by Kristine Stiles and Peter Selz, University of California Press, 1996

All in the artists' own words

Some Chapter headings:

Gestural Abstraction
Figuration
Process
Language and Concepts

Tamana
07-18-2004, 08:52 AM
"auntie"........I rest my case.



PS "auntie" I only call you that because I love you so much (and you did choose Mame for a moniker). :music:

Kinky


:angel:

ps: WHO wouldn't make a good troll?

blkros
07-18-2004, 09:09 AM
Pearl Bailey -
Nothing is sacred.

You might enjoy:
"Theories and Documents of Contemporary Art. A Sourcebook of Artist' Writings"
Edited by Kristine Stiles and Peter Selz, University of California Press, 1996

All in the artists' own words

Some Chapter headings:

Gestural Abstraction
Figuration
Process
Language and Concepts


OK. That one's next on my list to buy. I've been perusing it at Powells and Amazon. (Amazon, because they let you look inside to get a feel for it, and just the table of contents is making my mouth water.*insert drooly smiley here*)

mame
07-18-2004, 09:34 AM
bilk - do you live in a university town?

I often hit the college book store and browse the books required for art courses. I've found some goodies not necessarily on the mainstream conglomerate chain book stores top 10 lists...... :rolleyes:
but you Mr. highbrow intellectual, probably already know this.

bgreenaker
07-18-2004, 09:57 AM
:rolleyes:
I'm currently reading "This Much I Know Is True"
by Wally Lamb.
Betsy :p

blkros
07-18-2004, 10:24 AM
bilk - do you live in a university town?

I often hit the college book store and browse the books required for art courses. I've found some goodies not necessarily on the mainstream conglomerate chain book stores top 10 lists...... :rolleyes:
but you Mr. highbrow intellectual, probably already know this.
The nearest University town is about 30 miles away. Good idea about browsing the class books, though. Maybe next month, I'll head up there. :D
Don't think I've ever been called highbrow before, in fact the wife often calls me a pirate (for my language :eek: )

ronin
07-18-2004, 12:23 PM
i just finished god talks with arjuna - yogananda's commentary on the bhagavad gita. simply the most killer book ive ever read. amazing.

now reading the works of swami vivekananda and selected writings of meister eckhart.

Avie
07-19-2004, 08:24 AM
less than 50 percent of americans read for pleasure
excluding books that are forced upon them for work or school
that’s too depressing

but the state of literature is also poor
we need novels with the charm of good poetry
that are absolutely drowned in great storytelling




This is why I am home schooling my 9 year old son!

I just finished Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden... great read and an interesting intro to Japanese culture. (I couldn't put it down) Other than that Cold Moutain was good, I am not so sure I want the see the movie now because I don't want to be disappointed!

Avie :D

Tamana
07-19-2004, 08:31 AM
I just finished Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden... great read and an interesting intro to Japanese culture. (I couldn't put it down) Other than that Cold Moutain was good, I am not so sure I want the see the movie now because I don't want to be disappointed!

Avie :D

!


Memoirs!!! :D

Oh, and Cold Mountain Rocked! I do not think you will be disappointed; Kidman is phenomenal. Actually, the entire cast was fantastic; in thinking back, I can't honestly say that there was even one actor (and there normally always is) whose acting I didn't appreciate in that movie.

I think you'd be missing more if you didn't see it. Or maybe that's just the Carolina gal speakin' in me. ;)

Avie
07-19-2004, 07:04 PM
Oh, and Cold Mountain Rocked! I do not think you will be disappointed; Kidman is phenomenal. Actually, the entire cast was fantastic; in thinking back, I can't honestly say that there was even one actor (and there normally always is) whose acting I didn't appreciate in that movie.

I think you'd be missing more if you didn't see it. Or maybe that's just the Carolina gal speakin' in me. ;)

Okay you have convinced me to rent it tonight!!!

Avie