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mjcall
03-30-2004, 07:15 AM
All the great responses to my questions regarding Tumble Polishing made me think about preserving this information for easy access. Perhaps while we are still a new group we should think about starting a sticky "Jewelry Making Tips 101" thread where we can archive this type of information.

Thoughts anyone?

M_

P.S. Perhaps it should be "Wearable Arts Tips 101", not to slight our Beader and Fiber Arts members. :o

joycerenee
03-30-2004, 09:07 AM
Good idea! Here's a tip for beginners! :)

When I started using wire I was confused by all the numbers and wasn't really sure what all those numbers meant. The easiest way to remember wire size is this:

The bigger the number, the smaller the wire.

No. 12 Wire = 2.05 mm
No. 14 Wire = 1.63 mm
No. 16 Wire = 1.29 mm
No. 18 Wire = 1.02 mm
No. 20 Wire = .813 mm
No. 22 Wire = .643 mm
No. 24 Wire = .511 mm
No. 28 Wire = .320 mm




Joy

TurtleBay Jewelry
03-30-2004, 11:00 AM
Kudos Mike and great info for beginners Joy!

:)

~D.

jacy
03-30-2004, 11:50 AM
As a relative newbie I've been collection tons of links. Here is a good source for just about any technique or reference you can imagine:

Jewelry Making Techniques (http://www.jewelry-tools.com/WJU/techniques/alpha.htm)

HTH

lisilk
03-30-2004, 07:22 PM
Great idea. I will bring this the the attention of the moderators and see what we can come up with.

Li

chuckie
03-31-2004, 05:46 PM
How about a jewelry disaster-recovery technique?

When the inevitable overturned bead tray occurs, don't spend an hour on your hands and knees picking up beads. Take a knee-high nylon (or cut the leg off a pair), tightly rubber band the knee hi to the cleaning tool hose of your vaccuum, turn on the vaccuum and suck them up in a few minutes. The stocking will go up into the hose and create a pocket to catch the beads. Just make sure the nylon is tightly attached. I've lost my grip on the nylon once, however, I didn't have to dig through the vaccuum cleaner bag searching for individual beads in the dust. They were all in one place... inside the nylon.

This tip saves time and knee caps! You'll have to pick some dirt and fuzz out of your beads, but you can do it while sitting comfortably in a chair.

Char

Moth
03-31-2004, 10:19 PM
When doing wrapped loops on headpins or findings, use the outer, rounded groove in your crimping pliers to lock down the end of the wire. The round shape of the pliers curves the wire tail right around the stem slick as a whistle.

~~Mary

SuzyQ
04-01-2004, 11:04 AM
How about a jewelry disaster-recovery technique?

When the inevitable overturned bead tray occurs, don't spend an hour on your hands and knees picking up beads. Take a knee-high nylon (or cut the leg off a pair), tightly rubber band the knee hi to the cleaning tool hose of your vaccuum, turn on the vaccuum and suck them up in a few minutes. The stocking will go up into the hose and create a pocket to catch the beads. Just make sure the nylon is tightly attached. I've lost my grip on the nylon once, however, I didn't have to dig through the vaccuum cleaner bag searching for individual beads in the dust. They were all in one place... inside the nylon.

This tip saves time and knee caps! You'll have to pick some dirt and fuzz out of your beads, but you can do it while sitting comfortably in a chair.

Char

Excellent!!! I just wish you were around last week..... :(

Barrie
04-01-2004, 01:01 PM
Here's one for metalsmiths! The perfect holder for your sawblades! Take the refill out of a Bic style pen, put your blades in, put the cap on, voila, perfect blade holder. Remember to label it with the size.

For plier users and abusers!! Get a package of foam pencil grips from the office supply store, put them on the handles of your favorite pliers, and it will cut back on the blisters and caluses!! You could spend a fortune on the fancy ergonomic pliers, but this is cheaper! LOL!

If you need to cut lots and lots of the same length of wire, make a 'jig' out of a hardwood block. I use 4.5cm and 5.0 cm all the time, so I carved two grooves into a hardwood block, I slide the wire into the groove, snip, slide the wire in, snip. Works like a charm!

That's all for this morning, but give me time, I'm sure there are plenty more!!!

TurtleBay Jewelry
04-01-2004, 01:19 PM
Ahh, here's a quickie tip for wire workers. If you want inexpensive mandrels that work better than wooden dowels (I don't use dowels since the wire tends to make a groove and get stuck), head off to your local Hobby Shop. There, they sell various lengths of long hollow aluminum rods for model working, etc. They're really cheap, wire slides right off them, and they're marked in the sizes bead makers use, i.e., 5/32 or 3/16.

As long as you don't manhandle them, they retain their shape nicely and come in just about any size imaginable. Great for making coils and jump rings.

:)

~Danielle