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View Full Version : an attempt at velvety fabric I painted in 11th grade


decktilldawn
03-30-2004, 01:22 AM
I recently found this piece that I gave to my mother 2 years ago. She did some remodeling a year ago and had to put it away, only never to hang it up again!GRRRR

I posted this in oils, but I did it again in case anyone in here doesn't lurk over there

Bottoni
03-30-2004, 10:54 AM
Hey decktilldawn, I just had to write in and offer some praise for all the work you have posted, on various forums, so far. Coincidentally, I really got into art and completed my first realistic oil painting in Grade 11, though not to the degree of high realism that you have accomplished. Now that you have been taking advanced courses in painting, how would approach this work differently. It looks like you painted in the fabric in opaque coloured values and scumbled the whites and blacks to achieve that velvety texture...am I correct?

David

Matt Sammekull
03-30-2004, 11:47 AM
Hey there decktilldawn.

This is a great study of fabrics in my opinion. If only all of us who encounter painting fabrics in our art would take the time to study the differences in various materials. It's hard work but well worth it in my book.

Well done.

//matt

And by the way, - I don't hate David Hockney... nor do I love him... I simply just don't care. ;)

bjs0704
03-30-2004, 12:02 PM
It is beautiful work! :clap:

I am glad that you found "the lost painting". :D

I have always been interesting in the way different fabric fold and catch light.

I was also curious - some of my saddest painting have involved red objects, so I was curious about your color choices for the shadows and highlights.

Thanks

Barb Solomon :cat:

artmom
03-30-2004, 11:35 PM
Wonderfully painted fabric! :D

Lyn

Eugene Veszely
03-31-2004, 05:11 AM
Very well painted :)

decktilldawn
03-31-2004, 11:33 AM
Hello there all, and thank you for the nice words. I am sorry to say that I haven't had any advanced courses in art at all yet. I'm still trying to find ways to afford moving to Toronto to join the Angel Academy that is there. As for my color choices, If I rememeber correctly I would lay down an area of cadmium red (mixed with a little mars black to reach the desired middletone), and then pull my lights and darks out of the wet red with black and white. Not too involved as far as procedure and technique goes. The important thing was the proper placement of the lights and darks, this is what helped me to be successful with this one. With a fabric that has a velvet texture to it, the highlights will the the determining factor in your success.

Bottoni
03-31-2004, 11:54 AM
Have you spoken with other art schools and professional artists to see if you can really benefit from attending the Angel Academy. I recently did some investigation (I live in Toronto) and spoke with a few artists regarding that Academy...It is very, very good, and as good as any school or atelier in Italy..however, with the level of painting that you already can achieve, you may not need that type of instruction. Although it would not hurt to go there, it may be just as beneficial to find an atelier or a professional artist to mentor you. If I am correct, you will spend almost a year just doing sight drawings of sculptures, that you must perfect (copy) before you can pass. You may only need to take an advanced or condensed version. I am not saying that there isn't anything new to learn, but if you can't afford it, there are alternatives. I have seen your work and believe that you may only need some final, advanced instruction on various techniques, composition and colour theory. I spoke to the director of the Art Students League of Toronto, and he made a very convincing point that 'if you have the skills to achieve great work already, having a piece of paper saying that you attended a school of art doesn't make you more credible or a professional artist.' If you can't make it up here to Toronto, don't fret, because you are already establishing yourself as an artist by continually producing works of art, growing as an artist, and most importantly, you must market yourself to the right audience.
If you do make it up here in Toronto, it will be nice to have you in the Great White North, and I hope you get everything you want out of the school.

David :)

bjs0704
03-31-2004, 12:12 PM
Thanks for giving me an idea of how you handled the colors. I know that one couldn't possibly expect you to exactly which color you had used. Anyway, the general principles are more useful.

Good luck with finding whatever solution in going on for art training. I went through this problem myself for many years. David is right about there being many answers. But I have found that there are some opportunities that can arise because you have had formal training that are harder to come by if you don't.

Thanks again for showing us your lovely painting and for your advice.

Barb Solomon :cat:

arlene
04-01-2004, 01:02 AM
or what about the art student's league in NY...they may even offer scholarships?

...i agree that finding good instructors are more important. In the meantime even start looking into taking some life drawing classes.

Classical Vince
04-02-2004, 01:57 AM
Great study Deck. A lot of careful observations in your piece. Since this is already finished Im hesitant to make this comment but I cant help myself...ground that fabric! ;) I go nuts when I see a missing background :eek: Looking forward to your next thread.

Termini.
04-03-2004, 12:38 AM
Great study Deck. A lot of careful observations in your piece. Since this is already finished Im hesitant to make this comment but I cant help myself...ground that fabric! ;) I go nuts when I see a missing background :eek: Looking forward to your next thread.


White is a background.

Termini.
04-03-2004, 12:48 AM
or what about the art student's league in NY...they may even offer scholarships?

...i agree that finding good instructors are more important. In the meantime even start looking into taking some life drawing classes.


Arlene,

I agree. There are many good instructors around. Quite awhile back, I felt that I wanted to go back to school. School can be relaxing. Well, I found that what I was really lacking was contact with other artists. For me there is something very attractive about being in the company of other artists, who are all painting, drawing, sculpting. Workshops can be good resources. Also, Many local art organizations sponsor things such as "open studio time", or brown bag lunches. These can be helpful in finding mentors, instructors, and imersion in a creative atmosphere, can be energizing.

Classical Vince
04-03-2004, 12:54 AM
White is a background.

And ignorance is bliss.

Termini.
04-03-2004, 01:54 AM
And ignorance is bliss.

Learn then.

Danny
04-03-2004, 02:07 AM
Great job. I bought a book in nothing but folds wrinkles ans waves in eferything from clothing to draperies to skin. Looks like this is something you have really mastered. :clap: :clap:

Termini.
04-03-2004, 03:43 PM
Jeremy,

I have viewed the work that you have posted on this site, with enthusiasm. You have a unique style all of your own. You have it in you. This painting of velvet is incredible. You have captured it. There is nothing that you can't paint. As has been pointed out by Arlene, some life drawing classes can be very beneficial, and some work with an instuctor, or mentor, regarding composition might also be beneficial, yet based on the work that you have posted here at Wetcanvas, you already appear to have a good handle on composition. I also agree with what Bottoni said. Of course the choices are yours, and yours alone.
There are artists who for one reason or another always feel the need to be in training, or in an Atelier, circling endlessly in charcoal drawings, and value studies, hoping for the day that they will be a "master", or able to apply their brush to a canvas. Of course it is simply my opinion, yet I believe that you have already surpassed the busy work that Atelier study entails. Remember Rembrandt quit formal art education, after only 6 months, and learned everything else on his own. You may very well have more training than this, right now. Every one of his paintings is unique, and involves a unique technique. Although this is the classical art forum, I would mention that Van Gogh never made it past several months of formal art training, yet he did paint with other artists, and learned from them. It is a matter of whether or not we see the glass as half empty, or half full. There are folks who will only acknowledge that they are an artist when their "master" gives them permission. This is no longer the Renaissance, and there are no more guilds, that involve jumping through hoops, before one qualifies. You have listed youself as a "self taught artist" in your profile, thus implying that the glass is half full, rather than half empty. I know that I learn everyday, and have been out of school, and painting for 16 years. My glass is not all the way full, and I don't want it be be, either. Most of the artists that I know, acknowledge that there is much to learn. Of further thought, It was told to me a long time ago, that we need to be very very careful, with regard to who we take criticism from. Remember, it doesn't take much of a breeze, to extinguish a candle, and darken a room.

Trisha H
04-03-2004, 05:10 PM
Some very wise points there Trankina!
Especially the last one - it took me years to learn how to evaluate advice - perhaps one of the harder lessons.

Trisha.

Trisha H
04-03-2004, 05:13 PM
Decktilldawn - I absolutely love that velvet! You must hang it, it's wonderful.

Trisha.

decktilldawn
04-03-2004, 10:19 PM
Vince, when I did this piece I was going for a surreal effect with the white background. Sort of like the construct scenes in the Matrix. I understand how this throws off the realism a bit, but again that is what I was going for.

Yes, I also love the progress that a group oriented learning environment can bring about. When one is surrounded by others working at the same skill or trade, it seems to make he or she work in a healthy, competitive manner. This is how art got to be what it is today, or at least where it was 100 years ago.