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Aragorn
03-25-2004, 12:08 PM
Good Morning Everyone!

I was wondering about your favorite glue. I've used E6000 and it does okay but I am looking for something very strong that would hold a jumpring together very well. I am considering switching to soldering my jumprings closed but I know nothing about it. Sometimes I use split rings for security. What do you do to make sure your jump rings won't open and let the wire slip through?

Thanks!
Rachel

beclectic
03-25-2004, 12:21 PM
Sometimes it is a good thing when a jumpring opens.

The other day I bent over to pick something up and my glasses leash looped under the handle of my daughter's tricycle but I didn't know it. When I stood up the sudden weight on my glasses almost brought me to my knees but the jump ring opened, dropped the tricycle (missing my toe) and kept me from falling over.

I'd rather have a jump ring open than have a piece of jewelry break and have the parts go flying everywhere or worse yet have the jewelry not break and break a part of me instead.

joycerenee
03-25-2004, 02:40 PM
I hardly ever use glue. If it's metal, I usually solder and if it's a gemstone, I either set it or wire wrap it. I think maybe the only time I've used it, I used hypo-cement. The pin-point applicator was handy. :)

Joy

Charlee
03-25-2004, 03:42 PM
I use really good jump rings that have an *almost* invisible line when closed. Makes all the difference in the world. Also, for certain designs, Rio Grande (and one other place - can't remember where) has these locking jump rings - spendy, but great when a regular jump ring won't do.

As far as using glue on a jump ring, I don't. I've used 2-stage epoxy (aka dog-breath cement LOL) to repair costume jewelry and super glue to hold a knot in thread tho.

Charlee

Aragorn
03-25-2004, 04:56 PM
Where do you get the really good jump rings?

Thanks for the information.

Charlee
03-25-2004, 06:38 PM
Where do you get the really good jump rings?

I get mine here (http://www.urbanmaille.com). They're pricier than jump rings from Halstead or Rio, but far, far better, IMO. :)

Charlee

Aragorn
03-25-2004, 06:57 PM
Well, thanks for all the information. I am so jealous of everyone's wiring capabilities. I am not good with wire at all. I have a hard time even making loops for earrings. But, I like the idea of using soldering. I have some "solder filled" jump rings that I purchased from Fire Mountain but they said you need a torch to make it work. My husband has a soldering gun but I don't know how to use it. We are currently building a house (almost finished) so setting up my lampworking station has to wait until we are out of our apartment. It is against the rules to even grill a hamburger here. But, I have already learned a lot here. Now, if I could master taking pictures of my work, learn how to attach a picture and create a link, I would be much better off.

Am I the only person that dreams about beads? My husband looks at me like I am insane when I say that.

beclectic
03-25-2004, 09:31 PM
Am I the only person that dreams about beads? My husband looks at me like I am insane when I say that.

I've dreamed design solutions for necklaces and glasses leashes I'm making with beads, does that count? :)

I've also designed lampwork beads in my dreams but I don't even have a studio set up yet so I just draw them and save them for later.

Anyway, I don't think dreaming about beads is insane at all.

chuckie
03-26-2004, 05:47 AM
I use G-S Hypo Cement for sealing knots. Another glue that's been recommended to me by Randy from LaFusion Glass (credit where credit is due...) is Loc Tite E-30CL. Its great for glueing metal bails & pin backs to glass. Make sure you get the 2-part epoxy LocTite, not the kind that has been used for years by the auto industry.

Fast bonding super glues become brittle over the years and regular super glue will deteriorate beading threads, cords, etc. over time. I've read it in several places. I'm still trying to figure out if the GS-Hypo Cement is considered the same as Super Glue. I think it's a little different, but if anybody knows for sure, please let me know.

If you get the LocTite E-30CL, it is 2-part slow bonding epoxy. Squeeze a little onto a piece of cardboard, stir and let set for about 30 seconds. Apply to surface you are bonding with a toothpick. Press pieces together lightly. If the placement is incorrect, the glue dries slow enough to adjust the piece for up to two hours. It takes a while to cure, but you won't be losing pin backs or bails anymore.

Char

Aragorn
03-26-2004, 10:52 AM
That sounds great. Could you tell me where you get that glue? Does it dry clear?

Aislyn
03-26-2004, 10:26 PM
I can't tell you anything about glue, except that if your jumprings need it to stay closed, they're either weak rings or they aren't closed properly. Most run of the mill bead store rings are too skinny and too big to be strong. The heavier the gauge, the stronger the ring; the small the diameter, the stronger the ring. Soldering is certainly an option (for which you need a torch, not a gun or an iron) but it requires a lot more effort than simply using good rings and closing them well. My jewelry is very heavy, but I never solder anything and nothing is even remotely in danger of breaking. *s* Here's a ring closing tutorial with photos. Hope it helps.

http://www.urbanmaille.com/infopage.asp?page=10

chuckie
03-26-2004, 11:58 PM
That sounds great. Could you tell me where you get that glue? Does it dry clear?


Go to this site: http://www.mcmaster.com/
Type Loctite in the search box.
Select Loctite Epoxies
Scroll to the middle of the page and look for the heading "Loctite Hysol Epoxy and Urethane Adhesive Cartridges"
Look for this entry on the right side of the page. The description answers your clarity question.

"E-30CL Glass Bonder Epoxy- Has excellent optical clarity, so it's great for laminating applications. It has good insulating properties. Use on glass, plastic, optical fibers, ceramics, and metal."

It's $8.50 a tube. You can probably find it at a hardware store, automotive shop, or even Walmart if you're lucky. Shoot, search for it on E-bay. Heck, you can find everything else there...

Char

beclectic
03-27-2004, 07:45 AM
I don't bond jumprings, I agree with Aislyn that they shouldn't need it.

However, when I do need to glue something I use Bond 527 Multi-Purpose Cement. It is quick drying and gets the job done. It dries completely clear and doesn't get brittle.

Patch
03-27-2004, 08:13 AM
I don't have glue at all in my workroom. I rarely use jumprings and if I do I use the double ones so they are safer or at least, I feel like it. I have the idea that if *it* can't be hold in place by other ways than glue, *it* wasn't meant to be there.
Patch

mjcall
03-27-2004, 12:44 PM
I don't have glue at all in my workroom. I rarely use jumprings and if I do I use the double ones so they are safer or at least, I feel like it. I have the idea that if *it* can't be hold in place by other ways than glue, *it* wasn't meant to be there.
Patch

Patch

Are you aware that most aircraft, including airliners, are primarily put together with glue today, at least their skins. Perhaps you need to change your terminology from glued to chemically bonded. :evil:

M_

chuckie
03-27-2004, 01:31 PM
Patch

Are you aware that most aircraft, including airliners, are primarily put together with glue today, at least their skins. Perhaps you need to change your terminology from glued to chemically bonded. :evil:

M_

That's so funny! My DH used to be in the Air Force. We'd always laugh about how if the public only knew that some of the aircraft parts were attached with RTV glue! I figured if the stuff would hold together a jet flying at mach 2, it would certainly hold my jewelry together!

Char

P.S. Glued to chemically bonded? Is that the PC way to say it, as in not a drug addict, but chemically dependent?

Patch
03-27-2004, 01:32 PM
Patch

Are you aware that most aircraft, including airliners, are primarily put together with glue today, at least their skins. Perhaps you need to change your terminology from glued to chemically bonded. :evil:

M_


WWaaaaa. :eek: ..no I was not... what happened to good old pop rivets? As you can see, I am not mechanically inclined... Hurray for threads and needles :clap:

Patch