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Lisaanne
03-24-2004, 04:24 PM
(Cross posted in Portraiture as a WIP thread)

Oil on Canvas
16" x 20"

I walk the hinterlands of contemporary portraiture, exploring color and the human face as a universal icon. What are your impressions of this painting?

ejfarrae
03-24-2004, 06:18 PM
i love the looseness of it.

Lisaanne
03-24-2004, 10:29 PM
Thanks!

Smileawhyl
03-25-2004, 12:51 AM
I like everything (especially the red) except the background and I think that is because it doesn't match the title, to me. Somehow she doesn't look worried at all about the weather. Nice face. I also like your avatar.

lizzy
03-25-2004, 01:30 AM
delicious

Lisaanne
03-25-2004, 08:46 AM
Very helpful comments.

I will rethink the title. I titled it early to do the WIP in the portraiture forum, but it is not official yet. I am doing one painting of this model per season. This is the winter one, hence the winter title. I wasn't really thinking about the emotions the title conveys, more about the colors. Good point.

The background is based on my preliminary color scheme. I like its looseness and the look of showers, but I am going to play with the background in PhotoShop a bit before I sign the painting. I have a love/hate relationship going with the dark area in the upper left. Does your eye rest there too much? More white in the right?

I am leaving the figure alone.

VieSaintSo
03-25-2004, 08:54 AM
the REDS, delicious.... :)

Aibrean
03-25-2004, 09:37 AM
I really like the choice of colors here..the red/blues work very well!

ordie4
03-25-2004, 01:52 PM
i like the looseness
as well. the limited
pallette interests me
too.

:clap:

o

Smileawhyl
03-25-2004, 09:15 PM
I have a love/hate relationship going with the dark area in the upper left. Does your eye rest there too much? More white in the right?
I think the background from right to left creates a motivational rift. The figure is in two different places to me. My eye wants to rest in the white, but is somehow unnaturally pulled to 'the dark side' in a sort of resigned slide.

Lisaanne
03-26-2004, 02:36 PM
Thanks for all the comments! The contemporary forum really had some great and useful insights! I'll be spending more time here in the future.

I didn't change the background. I have come to terms with it. I think the tension helps keep the figure in two places at once, engaged with the viewer and part of the backdrop.

I signed the painting this morning and posted the finished product on my websites. I renamed it "Doorway". It is a more fitting title with the figure merging and emerging from the background.

Online Art Journal - "Doorway" (http://homepage.mac.com/lisareinke/B928712598/C1649878208/E1261418339/index.html)

Pilan
03-26-2004, 03:23 PM
this is a beautiful portrait of a woman. the blues are wonderful as well. :clap:

lspinella
03-26-2004, 03:31 PM
your painting technique is very sculpted.do you do a lot of glazing?. I particularly like the eyes and nose of the girl.

do you paint in this size usually. I'd like to see this really big!

nine malic molds
03-26-2004, 03:51 PM
the face as a universal icon? i would like to know more about that idea and how it relates to this painting.

Lisaanne
03-27-2004, 09:28 AM
your painting technique is very sculpted.do you do a lot of glazing?. I particularly like the eyes and nose of the girl.

do you paint in this size usually. I'd like to see this really big!

You are right. My painting technique is very sculpted. I paint like I sculpt in clay. I like media with weight to it that I can move and carve with the brush and that stays the way I left it. Oils are great for this reason and watercolors can drive me to drink for the same reason. Even with the masters, I love brushstrokes in the paint.

No, I do not do a lot of glazing. I paint alla prima, wet on wet, working the canvas for one or maybe two consecutive days, with final touches on the third day, painting lean to fat and mindful of the transparency or opaqueness of the colors in the palette.

I have learned through experience that I will hate my painting if I spend too long working on it and will never get over it. I love seeing the results of spontaneity in my own work. Keeps it fresh and we can part as friends. However, I love work by other artists that produce long labors of love that just get better and better. No matter how good, I would still take a knife and destroy a work that sits on my easel too long, or at least mentally divorce myself from it.

I have paintings ranging in size from 4"x5" to 2'x3' right now. I have a 30"x40" canvas that I haven't used yet but am looking forward to. Much larger than that and I am going to have to reinvent my easel system and find a larger studio to work in. Plus, I will have to buy some wider brushes! Someday!!!! Maybe sooner than later.

Lisaanne
03-27-2004, 10:44 AM
the face as a universal icon? i would like to know more about that idea and how it relates to this painting.

I still haven't found the right words to describe this idea, but I believe as humans we respond to the face like no other image. It is the first image we respond to and that link to the face never goes away. However, as we get older, we spend less and less time considering the face's appeal and its importance to the human experience. I like to give people the opportunity to see the face in a way that is separate from traditional portraiture which is about likeness. There are plenty of artists out there who are excellent at capturing your likeness with the perfect skin tones, but to tell you the truth, I find 98% of portraits done for likeness only appeal to individuals who recognize the subject, and to a lesser extent, those who admire the technique. I think that in this world where film, crowds, snapshots and portraits are common our thought process in regards to the human face is towards recognition and the search for recognition stops the process of enjoying our link to the human face.

In regards to this painting, first there is no direct eye contact with the viewer. You can regard her face without having to confront her stare. The unreal color helps you to refrain from searching your memory banks to see if you know her. You don't know anyone (yet) who is blue, purple, green and red. The sweeping reds frame the face and pull you into the facial features, starting with the red in the eyes. At a subconscious level you appreciate the lines in the facial features, but when was the last time you allowed yourself to just enjoy them and trace them? This painting does show why I love the human face.

Sometimes I paint the human face from memory and sometimes use a model. If I am painting a real person, I do still like to capture an aspect of the person, maybe a feeling I get when around the individual. I think the subjects like the paintings because I reveal a new way of seeing themselves, which leads back to new ways of seeing the face. I've been told it is kind of like painting auras when I paint a real person. I find if I look for the shapes, lines and lighting that capture the essence of a face and then play with colors that evoke a general feeling or aspect of an individual I get an interesting painting with a wider appeal than traditional portraiture. Sometimes its just the freedom to enjoy color and shapes in the familiar and comfortable surroundings of a stylistic face and sometimes the grandeur of a more realistic face in form, but not in color.

I hope that helps a bit.

nancyw
03-27-2004, 11:38 AM
She is someone I would like to meet. Approachable, strong, friendly, at home in her own personality. I would love to talk to this person. Nancy in FL