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Alan Cross
02-25-2004, 12:36 AM
I just got my new kiln its a hot start by skutt with a 15 inch chamber does anyone know what the running costs are each batch....I use the slow mode and it runs about 10 hours from cold start to back down to under 100 degrees. I don't want to run it for that long with only a few beads in unless its cost effective any ideas?
Alan :)

Lenda
02-25-2004, 09:14 AM
Hi Allan, someone put a way to compute your electricity cost up a while ago. I have a Skutt GM10F kiln, 110v and I figuired it cost 9 cents an hour to run. So mine runs for 10 hours a day for under a $1.:D That's at garaging temps for 10 hours, I'm sure if you're making it go up and down in temps like for fusing or something that would change.

Alan Cross
02-25-2004, 11:27 AM
Thanks Lenda that gives me an idea anyways.....I should ask where I bought it also....they might know.
Alan :)

MaureenKennedy
02-26-2004, 03:12 AM
Alan - I just "loaned" out one of my kilns to the local stained glass shop. She said in trying to figure how much it costs to use it, she would look at the specifications of it as to how many kilowatts it uses in operating and timesing that by the cost of killowatts on her electric bill. Perhaps this will help you.

AlexM
02-26-2004, 10:27 AM
Alan, I figured out that my kiln costs about 10 cents an hour to run. My electric bills have borne this out.

To figure out the cost, multiply the wattage of the kiln by cost of your electricity per kilowatt hour, and then multiply by about .4 (this is because the kiln does not cycle 100% of the time, it only runs about 40% of the time).

Alan Cross
02-26-2004, 11:44 AM
Thanks Alex and Maureen I was hoping it didn't cost much lol now I can play with it.....
Alan :)

Melinda Melanson
02-26-2004, 01:51 PM
And now for the bad news. Turn on your Exhaust fan and run on out to see how fast your electric meter is running. Wow, my fan sucks alot of electricity. I must try and find the specs to figure out actual electrical use.

Alan Cross
02-26-2004, 03:13 PM
Hi Melinda I would check something else as you fan has no heating element it would be using less power then your hair dryer, maybe you have eletric heat and it came on at the same time...
Alan :)

dlbirtwell
04-02-2005, 11:47 AM
Alan, I figured out that my kiln costs about 10 cents an hour to run. My electric bills have borne this out.

To figure out the cost, multiply the wattage of the kiln by cost of your electricity per kilowatt hour, and then multiply by about .4 (this is because the kiln does not cycle 100% of the time, it only runs about 40% of the time).

I know this is an old thread but I am figuring out how big of a kiln to buy and am trying to take into account the electricity cost as a factor. I have looked at other older threads as well.

So, my last electric bill was $77.23 with a usage of 790 kwh. Therefore, this should be an average of $.10 per kwh, correct?

Taking for example the largest Arrow Spring's kiln - AF1818-C. The website says that it 'operates on 240 volts and draw 26 amps and 6240 watts'.

So do I take the $.10 X 6240 watts X .4? That equals 249.50. What does it represent? It cannot be $249.50 per hour!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Any help on this is appreciated. This decision has been a long time in the making and I want to make sure I make the right one.

Thanks.

Steve Wright
04-02-2005, 12:15 PM
Diane, you are on the right track but need to fine tune your formula. 6240 watts is 6.24 kw, and your electricity costs .10 per kw. This makes the bottom line easier to take.

$.10 X 6.24 = $.62 per hour at full on. Applying the .4 makes the operating cost about 25 cents an hour.

Steve

dlbirtwell
04-02-2005, 04:11 PM
Thanks Steve! I thought I needed to divide by something due to the 'kilo' part of the equation.

That is much better to handle. Maybe I can afford that big kiln now!!

As always, much appreciation for the help.

gfoster
04-02-2005, 08:57 PM
Here's how to calculate the cost to run any electrical device.

Multiply volts times amps to get watts. Divide by 1000. Multiply by the cost per kilowatthour of electricity.

e.g. my kiln is 120v at 14amps.

120 x 14 = 1680, 1680/1000 = 1.680, my power costs 5.5 cent per kilowatthour, 1.680 x 5.5 = 9.24.

It costs me at most 9.24 cents per hour to run my kiln. Remember, the kiln isn't actually firing all the time so this is the max cost.

The cost per kilowatthour is sometimes on your power bill. If it's not, call your local power company and they will provide it.

emBeads
04-03-2005, 06:09 PM
WOW! This formula will help me out a lot too! I'm in the process of buying a new kiln as well, and developing a price list for my bead catalogue...and this formula will really help me out with figuring out my costs and profit!!!!

Thanks everyone!

~Erin

loopydo
04-04-2005, 03:56 AM
Hi Diane,
1 watt=.001 kilowatts......multiply your kiln wattage by .001 and then multiply that by your kilowatt cost per hour and then multipy by .4. I think that should work. Anyone is welcome to jump in here if I'm wrong-I'm soooooo math challenged. I didn't know that this is how you figure out how much it cost to run my kiln. Thank you all for the great info!!!!! I can relax when I go in and eat my lunch now!! Kept wondering how much that sandwich was REALLY costing me!!! Wet Canvas is the best (that means all of you :clap: )
Linda

AlexM
04-04-2005, 10:38 AM
Here's a real world check on kiln operating costs. I make beads full time now, so I run the kiln about 8 hours a day, 4 to 6 days per week. I've noticed that my electrical bill is on the average about $45 per month higher than before I started lampworking, and this increase includes operating my exhaust fan and 2 oxygen concentrators during that time too. So unless you plan to lampwork full time, it won't make a big difference in your utility bills. Another perspective on it is all I have to do is sell one set of beads per month to offset the electrical increase.