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View Full Version : Pastels with egg base?


caseynrbq
02-17-2004, 02:29 PM
Someone had posted awhile back about using egg as a base for pastels.

This really DOES sound quite intriguing to me - one question - did you do this with regular (dry?) pastels, or oil pastels? I think I will try this with oil pastels.


Oh, and here's another question -- do you think it would also work on canvas (as opposed to paper)? I'd like to try it on canvas too!

Thanks,
Diane.

skintone
02-17-2004, 02:58 PM
There is an article on egg tempera in this channel. It gives step by step instructions.

Laura Shelley
02-17-2004, 03:36 PM
Someone had posted awhile back about using egg as a base for pastels.

This really DOES sound quite intriguing to me - one question - did you do this with regular (dry?) pastels, or oil pastels? I think I will try this with oil pastels.


Oh, and here's another question -- do you think it would also work on canvas (as opposed to paper)? I'd like to try it on canvas too!

Thanks,
Diane.

The procedure in that article would only work with dry pastels. You shave them and use the powder as pigment for your tempera. It's just like regular egg tempera otherwise.

As far as I know, egg-based paints aren't flexible enough to use on canvas. A rigid panel is the best support for egg tempera.

If you have oil pastels and want to experiment, you could try using them on primed canvas with a brush and turpentine. That should work just fine. The major difference between oil pastels and oil paint is that most oil pastels contain wax, so they don't dry completely. Oil paint sticks are rather like oil pastels in how you use them, but they dry to a hard finish like oil paint.

MM

skintone
02-17-2004, 03:55 PM
BTW welcome to the WC!!
To add to what Madame Manga said, you can also apply oil pastels(ops) directly canvas. Or apply them to a canvas that is still wet with turp. This has the same effect as watercolor on wet paper. Bits of op can be dissolved to create washes. Or you can use a turp dip brush and lift the pigment from the stick to the canvas. John Elliot explains these methods in his book.