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View Full Version : Evening


Kevin M
08-17-2001, 03:32 PM
http://homepage.eircom.net/~bot/pan2.jpg
http://homepage.eircom.net/~bot/pan2-t.jpg
Canon Powershot G1

LornaM
08-19-2001, 03:20 PM
absolutely gorgeous ! the sky is a dream come true.

Leaflin
08-20-2001, 01:10 PM
WOW
Absolutely breathtaking!

ftb
08-22-2001, 02:56 PM
i love this shot.. almost like some of my paintings.. the sky is beautiful.. there is only one true master artist the one who created it all in the beginning our grand creator.. how nice indeed

Kevin M
08-23-2001, 04:40 PM
Hi LornaM,Leaflin and Ptb,

'Evening' is a merging of 4 vertical shots at 50mm (35mm equivalent). They were shot in manual mode since auto mode on a pan can give widely varying exposures. The time,last Thursday, was after a stormy day which can result in dramatic skies.

Kevin

phil_m
08-23-2001, 05:03 PM
Very nice, indeed.

I like the exposure with the land silhouetted and the blue of the sky looking very natural. Did the G1 figure it out or did you help it?

(I shoot 35mm and have no idea what kind of light meters or compensation controls are normal on digital cameras.)

Kevin M
08-24-2001, 01:12 AM
Hi phil_m,

The G1 and most compact digitals are the same as film cameras minus the actual film. One important advantage they have is the ability to review shots as you take them to check exposure etc.

I usually shoot in manual mode using a grey card and only use auto or program for quick point and shoot. For accurate exposure in difficult lighting the grey card is hard to beat. I have adapted my lens cap as grey card to save me lugging a card around. Just aim the camera spotmeter square at the cap and take a reading.

http://homepage.eircom.net/~bot/grey.jpg

phil_m
08-24-2001, 09:12 AM
The "lens cap as grey card" trick is a really good idea. I've never run into that one before!

Somewhat related question.... Would it be possible to use a digital camera, in effect, as a very detailed light meter to get exposure previews when shooting film? (...the way some people, I believe, use Polaroids to do exposure tests.)

I suppose it just depends on the compatibility of the ISO, shutter, and f-stop controls for the different cameras.

Kevin M
08-24-2001, 04:44 PM
I suspect that it would be quite possible to use a digital in place of a Polaroid to check exposures with a conventional film camera. It would probably involve (as you said) calibrating both cameras with some tests to ensure that they tallied with regards iso speed beforehand. Digital images seem to emulate print film which has a wider dynamic range than transparency so this would have to be taken into account shooting slide film.

The grey card/lens cap works very well for subjects that averaging meters make a hash of (eg high contrast etc). However, whilst it would be convenient if everything could be represented with the reflectivity of 18% grey, in the real world this is not the case and it has to be used with disgression. It does however put you in the right zone for many subjects and within a stop one way or the other for really difficult ones. Bracketing almost invariably resolves these.

Kevin

crazi4art
08-24-2001, 06:22 PM
wow!!!!!that is super, where was this pic taken at? it is truly a beautiful site!
~crazi

auntie_chaos
09-08-2001, 11:13 AM
Now this one's absolutely breath-taking!!! Hard to find words to discribe the feeling I got when I looked at this photo. Thanx a million for sharing this one!