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Axl
02-12-2004, 10:36 AM
I was just reading through another thread, and it seams that a lot of people who choose to go to school and get their degrees in their later years find they get much more out of school than they did when they were first out of highschool. To me, that sounds like a really good thing.

When I took a year off of school, a lot of the people around me got very upset at me, because they feared that if I took a year off, I wouldn't ever go back to school. I find it interesting, though, when I listen to you guys talking about how your education is actually meaning more to you in your later years, than it did when you was a younge thing. It sounds like it is almost better to just go back a few years down the road, instead of going to it straight out of highschool. I must say, that I totally believe that I would be %500 more prepared for school if I were several years older than right now. There is so many changes, and everything happening all at once. Not only do we get to learn about our areas of study, but we also have to learn how to live in the real world, how to manage bills, jobs, life, everything else.. It is so stressful lol

What do you guys think of this? Are you with a lot of the people around me who think it is majorly important for us to get our education now? Or do you also, feel, that it would me more benificial to wait.

Just interested in hearing some thoughts.

pinkbubelz
02-12-2004, 12:01 PM
I was just reading through another thread, and it seams that a lot of people who choose to go to school and get their degrees in their later years find they get much more out of school than they did when they were first out of highschool. To me, that sounds like a really good thing.

When I took a year off of school, a lot of the people around me got very upset at me, because they feared that if I took a year off, I wouldn't ever go back to school. I find it interesting, though, when I listen to you guys talking about how your education is actually meaning more to you in your later years, than it did when you was a younge thing. It sounds like it is almost better to just go back a few years down the road, instead of going to it straight out of highschool. I must say, that I totally believe that I would be %500 more prepared for school if I were several years older than right now. There is so many changes, and everything happening all at once. Not only do we get to learn about our areas of study, but we also have to learn how to live in the real world, how to manage bills, jobs, life, everything else.. It is so stressful lol

What do you guys think of this? Are you with a lot of the people around me who think it is majorly important for us to get our education now? Or do you also, feel, that it would me more benificial to wait.

Just interested in hearing some thoughts.

Axl,

There is a mixed blessing in both ways...

I encourage people to go to school when they are fresh out of high school for a few reasons--
1) you generally have no financial burdens (like a house, car, etc.) to weigh you down and cause worry
2) It is easier to learn and retain what you have learned when you are younger
3) You most likely don't have a full-time job to compete with your study time
4) when you graduate, you'll be competing with your peers vs. people 10 years younger than you
5) once you get into the work force, you will be less likely to go back to school and finish....

However, the value of attending school when a little older is this:
1) you are probably going to be more focused because you CHOOSE to go there vs. having other people EXPECT you to be there
2) you are more likely to be funding your own education, therefore, you will have realised the value of the money you earned, and will more than likely study harder to get the better grades.
3) you (hopefully) will have learned how to better organize your time (due to having children, juggling a job(s), having to deal with bills etc.
4) you may have life experience which will impact what you are learning and how you will be able to understand the material.
5) older students tend to have a better idea of what they want to do "when they grow up", therefore are less likely to do a lot of "exploring"-- they tend to know what their goal is and will be more focused on getting to that particular degree.
6) if you already have another degree, you will understand what is required of you and being older and having more knowledge of campus resources and being closer in age to the professors, you may be more likely to seek help when you need it.
7) If you take a break for a year, you may understand how hard it is to advance in your job without a degree, so you will be more ready to "buckle down" and study when you come back. Plus, sometimes your brain needs a change of pace-- that's probably why so many schools offer overseas studies these days (besides the world becoming a global economy, etc.)

Now, of course, these are a few reasons I find why I think each has value over the other... however, in the long run, it has more to do with having an education and then putting that knowledge to use. It is far more easy to get "distracted" if you leave school--(i.e. some people married, have kids, etc. and then find it harder to go back.)

Bottom line: Get your degree and you will (hopefully) go farther in the world.... Now, if you decide you want to get a Masters or something else, then you might wait.... I mean, I am deciding to go back to get a Master of Arts in studio art... however, the down side is that I have so many other commitments taking my time that I wish I had just gone right out of undergrad (I would have had my degree for 9 years by now and probably be teaching at a university!)

--Iris

pinkbubelz
02-13-2004, 01:10 AM
Oh yes, I forgot a plus to going to college just after high school-- If you do that, there are many more scholarship and financial aid opportunities available, vs. if you are a returning student or one who is entering school a few years after college....

:-)

--Iris

fluffy black cat
02-13-2004, 01:56 AM
I think there are two sides to this, and it depends on the individual as to what is best for them..

I personally cannot imagine not wanting to go back to do my degree, but some people, especially with other more mundane courses, might not see it that way. To get into my uni course I need a good academic score and a great folio. Even if I was able to get the folio together and get in- I would not want to yet. I want to do a tafe course (I've told my parents one year, but I want to do a diploma for two) and a few short community courses before I go.

Why? I want more life experience and I want to develop some of my skills and refine them so I benefit more from the degree course. I'll get way more out of it. I just dont feel ready for uni.

BTW, this is a really good thread. I'd be interested in printing it out and showing it to the aforesaid "people around me." I hope more people post, because its a really critical decision at this age. (seems that way anyway)

broken pencil
02-13-2004, 10:13 AM
I just wasn't ready to commit to study when I was just out of highschool at 17. I decided to start studying when I was 23. I knew most of my life that I wanted to study architecture, so there was no question of what I was going to do, just the question of when.

I copped a lot of flack from family and friends, telling me I should grow up, get it out the way, but I had to travel and live life. I knew that one day I'd wake up and it would feel time to study.

I am getting much more out of my studies after having seen a bit of the world and its beautiful people.

In many ways when you just get out of highschool, you're just a dumb kid, totally unaware to the many things that are crucial to getting the most out of artistic education. (or atleast I was ;) )

Axl
02-13-2004, 10:50 AM
I agree that this has become a really realy good thread. Thankyou guys for your responces, and I hope that more people take the time to respond as well.

When I graduated from highschool I wasn't sure about going to school. I knew that at some point I wanted to continue on in my education, but I didn't feel like it was right for me at that time, and I also had trouble deciding what to study (music or art) When I applied to school and got my scholarship it would have been stupid for me not to go. However, sometimes I regret my decision, and wonder if I shouldn't have waited a little while longer before doing it. I was surprized to see just how many students were not just out of highschool, who took time off; to travel, to work, to do whatever, and how much more of a handle they had on living Sometimes I'm happy that I've gone, sometimes I wonder if I should just be working fulltime and try and establish myself first. I wonder if maybe I should just stop after this year, and maybe return later - that is always in my thoughts.

Life has so many choices to be made! lol

broken pencil
02-13-2004, 12:42 PM
...sometimes I wonder if I should just be working fulltime and try and establish myself first...

NOOOOO!!! Don't take time off to establish yourself. If you're going to take time off it should be an experience about nourishing your soul.

After six years of travelling and working along the way, I came home with very few possessions. Many of my friends had got loans to buy cars or mortgages on houses, and they'd look at me and giggle. I had no car, probably never will, had no house, probably will get one someday, had no 25 disc CD player or widescreen TV, but I did have a head full of amazing memories, I had seen amazing places, mind blowing art, and beautiful, amazing people. But no photos to show everyone, it was all in my head. I had a friend who had gone to Paris and we were talking about it with his family, and I'm talking about the curbs and the gutters, and the lamp posts, and all they wanted to know was if I had been to the Eiffel Tower...Whoa, way off track...

anyway...for anyone who is interested in taking time off between highschool and uni/college, I think it is a very important period in your life, an era unto itself, because you won't be the same person after uni/college, but this time must be cherished every day. Be impulsive, do whatever crazy things that pop into your mind, hitchhike across Europe, or ride up New Zealand, or across Australia...you're young...

pinkbubelz
02-13-2004, 02:35 PM
I think there are two sides to this, and it depends on the individual as to what is best for them..

I personally cannot imagine not wanting to go back to do my degree, but some people, especially with other more mundane courses, might not see it that way. To get into my uni course I need a good academic score and a great folio. Even if I was able to get the folio together and get in- I would not want to yet. I want to do a tafe course (I've told my parents one year, but I want to do a diploma for two) and a few short community courses before I go.

Why? I want more life experience and I want to develop some of my skills and refine them so I benefit more from the degree course. I'll get way more out of it. I just dont feel ready for uni.

BTW, this is a really good thread. I'd be interested in printing it out and showing it to the aforesaid "people around me." I hope more people post, because its a really critical decision at this age. (seems that way anyway)

pinkbubelz
02-13-2004, 03:51 PM
Oops, I didn't mean to re-post that.

What I wanted to say was that one of my friends didn't got to college until she was 23. However she studied way harder and really KNEW that she wanted to be a teacher.... She told me that if she were to do it over again, she wouldn't have waited so long, but she also doesn't regret her decision to go back to school.

Another friend is just starting out now and she's 35. She was a young mom and in fact, her daughter is about to enter college herself. She tells me she wishes she had gone when younger, but at the time, she didn't really have any choice in the matter.... Now, she is ready to go back. It's a lot tougher and she has to re-take a lot of the prerequisite classes (most universities and colleges require at least some math and English for their degrees.) That's the hard part of waiting a long time to return to school...

It IS an individual decision, with its ups and downs either way, but like I said before, if you do it when you are young, you don't tend to have as many other responsibilities. It is really easy to say "just another year" if you leave college-- that's why I recommend that you stay in school and finish up all at once if possible.


--Iris

pinkbubelz
02-13-2004, 03:57 PM
NOOOOO!!! Don't take time off to establish yourself. If you're going to take time off it should be an experience about nourishing your soul.

After six years of travelling and working along the way, I came home with very few possessions. Many of my friends had got loans to buy cars or mortgages on houses, and they'd look at me and giggle. I had no car, probably never will, had no house, probably will get one someday, had no 25 disc CD player or widescreen TV, but I did have a head full of amazing memories, I had seen amazing places, mind blowing art, and beautiful, amazing people. But no photos to show everyone, it was all in my head. I had a friend who had gone to Paris and we were talking about it with his family, and I'm talking about the curbs and the gutters, and the lamp posts, and all they wanted to know was if I had been to the Eiffel Tower...Whoa, way off track...

anyway...for anyone who is interested in taking time off between highschool and uni/college, I think it is a very important period in your life, an era unto itself, because you won't be the same person after uni/college, but this time must be cherished every day. Be impulsive, do whatever crazy things that pop into your mind, hitchhike across Europe, or ride up New Zealand, or across Australia...you're young...

I agree--if you plan to take time off, make sure you make it something that will add to your life experiences, rather than just working and paying bills off...
:-)

In my own personal experience, the summer between semesters, I travelled to France, Italy and Switzerland with my dad for 15 days. It was an amazing experience to see the artwork I had learned about in my art history classes... I think it really added to my final year in school. (sure wish I had taken a semester abroad-- it would have been even more amazing!)

--Iris

smalltawnywolf
02-15-2004, 02:12 AM
A_H_G,
Hhhmmm. >sigh< Wow. Uh.
All I can tell you is what I have experienced.

>What do you guys think of this? Are you with a lot of the people around me who think it is majorly important for us to get our education now? Or do you also, feel, that it would me more benificial to wait.

Just interested in hearing some thoughts.<

I was young, talented and scared. Competition was/is my nemesis. I fled art. I got my GED. Worked since age 16. Dad said, "Honest work is good for the soul." I have been: a hallmark card seller, a dog-collar sewer, a waitress, a cat-food expert, a radio air-time pusher, print ad sales slave, bike mechanic and much more. There isn't one moment I regret.

Except that I regret not having gone to college. No college degree meant no job with pay much over the poverty line... really. I didn't go because it seemed that there was nothing there for me. It didn't occur to me to just go! Now, twenty-two years later (second attempt at the degree)... I'm in a community college... back where I should have been so long ago.

My point is... do it now. Don't wait, goth-girl... it sounds like you have a family who will support you...this is important. My first attempt at college (age around 26), I was working full-time and attending classes. Holy mackerel... studying and paying rent... it's no picnic. If you feel you're gonna explode if you don't get away... get away, but with the promise that you'd return soon... for your future.

There are no knights in shining armor, no jobs to get you to the top without a degree and only you who looks in your mirror. Now, with all that I have shared, I tell you; Trust in yourself.

M...

Axl
02-15-2004, 09:35 AM
I didnt want to turn this into a thread about me, I just wanted to hear different opinions on the subject matter from everyone, for those on here who may be thinking about when to continue their education. I've already made my choice.

baquitania
02-15-2004, 02:35 PM
Axl:

Wow you've gotten some majorly good advice here, and all I can add is this:

Time is your enemy.

What we put off for tomorrow, might not be there to accomplish. Heck we might not be there. And it's best to dig deep and make the most of the situation you are in, then to give up. Not saying that you are, I meant to step away. Yes there's no way of knowing if every decision we make is the best one, but what is constant, what we cannot hope to save away for are the anomolies that as you are in the soup, something new will be added to it.

Only you can decide to live your own life, and if you need a breather to think, that's not an unimportant thing to consider. I am certainly not implying that life is a race, and we should hurry up. But since you have one foot in the door, I would suggest you move forward and through it. If you were not already at university, then perhaps you could rethink before a deadline needed to be filled. Yes there are many many choices in life. Listen to your gut, listen to the reason of others who want the best for you, and look back on mistakes of others, hoping you will not make them, decide to leave bread crumbs on your way out, and live and learn.

All my best to you,

Bobby

TigerEye
02-16-2004, 01:54 AM
Ive been taking a year off of school beforing hitting College, but I had my reasons, mostly that I was on the verge of collapse, and I was sick. Everyone has to look at that decission with whats best for them in mind. Every situation is different. Do I plan on taking more than a year off? Probably not, but we will see what comes down the road. ;)

amo
02-17-2004, 12:17 AM
I think it totally depends on what kind of person you are.
I "took a year off" after highschool to do what I wanted (go to Canada, in my case). I grew up tremendously in that year- and I also met my husband, got married a year later, had kids... So much for going to university. Now I'm trying to pick up university courses by correspondence, while raising the kids... It's not easy. But on the other hand, I don't regret doing what I did, because I did exactly what I wanted to do.

If you know that art is your passion, and there isn't much of a chance that you'll ever want to do anything else, then go for it. An education is never a bad thing. But if you don't know what you want, then don't go to university, or art school just for something to do. Go travel, or flip burgers at a fast food joint for a while, then you just might figure out what you really want (and likely, it's not burger-flippin').

I guess what I'm saying is that some people know what they want when they're kids, and others need a really long journey to find out (and some don't ever figure it out, but that's a very sad thing and shall not be mentioned here ;)). The students that do best in school are those who followed their passion to get there, and I guess older students are more likely to have done that than younger ones. But that doesn't mean that it can't happen for those, too.

Incidentally, if I'd gone to uni at 19, I'd have studied something quite different than what I'd be doing now (I hadn't discovered art then). So, even if I had gone then, I might still be doing the correspondence thing now, so it might be six of one and half a dozen of the other.

The key is to figure out what you want, and then go for it. And whether you figure it out at 12, 18, 36 or 72 ultimately doesn't matter that much.