PDA

View Full Version : Blockx


Einion
08-11-2001, 10:53 PM
I found the <A HREF=http://www.blockx.be/en/ensembleen.htm>Blockx</A> site recently and was pleased to see their oil colour swatches are scans of the actual paint full-strength, plus a tint(?). They also very helpfully list the pigments used so out of curiosity I decided to check through them to see if their poor reputation was justified, considering the number of fans they have here. It's good news I'm pleased to say and I thought it would be useful to list the results here.

They are subdivided into groups of four as per their swatches.

Mars Violet PR101
Cassel Earth PBr7
Transparent Brown PBr7, PG18 - a blend of one of the natural earths with Viridian. Should be totally lightfast.
Burnt Umber PBr7

Transparent Mars Brown PR101
Burnt Sienna Light PBr7
Burnt Sienna Deep PBr7
Transparent Mars Red PR101 - the new transparent forms of the synthetic iron oxides are apparently excellent glazing colours. Their lightfastness varies so you may want to to test for yourself to be sure if you want use them in this application.

Brown Ochre PBr7
Mars Brown PR101, PY42, PBk11 - a blend of mars red, yellow and black. Why they didn't just use the genuine article (PBr6) is beyond me as it makes lovely tints and looks a lot more lively than the sample appears to be.
Transparent Yellow Mars PY42 - one of the new synthetic iron oxide pigments. By reputation a superb glazing colour but again you might want to run your own trials as this is a critical test of a pigment's performance.
Mars Yellow PY42 - their version appears to fall about halfway between their Yellow Ochre and Mars Yellow-Orange in hue and value. Should be totally lightfast.

Gold Ochre PBr7
Italian Earth PBr7
Yellow Ochre PY42 - PY42 is Mars Yellow, generally darker-valued and less yellow than Yellow Ochre and the sample seems to bear this out. Totally lightfast but it would be nice to see it named correctly.
Brown Ochre Light PBr7

Venetian Red PR102 - PR102 is really Light Red, lighter-valued and more orange in masstone than the colour generally referred to by this name which the sample appears to bear out. Totally lightfast.
Mars Yellow-Orange PY42 - PY42 is Mars Yellow, sample looks to be one of the darker forms, quite brown in masstone.
Light Red PR102 - another form of PR102, looks to be redder and slightly more saturated than their Venetian Red. Again, completely lightfast.
Mars Red PR101

Capucine Yellow Light PR149, PR101 - a blend of Perylene Red BL (see below) with one of the red earths. The colour is quite distinctly red so the name is fairly misleading.
Capucine Yellow Deep PR149, PR101 - again very red, but looks darker and duller than the above, uses the same pigments probably with more PR101 in the mix.
Rose Madder Pale PR149 - the base pigment used in the above convenience mixes. Perylene Red BL is semiopaque, staining and dark-valued with good tinting strength and a reasonable lightfastness reputation.
Rose Lake PV19 - Quinacridone Red or Violet, looks lighter-valued and redder than their Magenta.

Crimson Lake PR264 - this is Pyrrole Rubine, semiopaque, dark-valued and moderately-unsaturated crimson with reasonable tinting strength and apparently very good lightfastness. By reputation close to the masstone of Alizarin Crimson but not transparent.
Carmine PR264, PV19 - a convenience blend of the previous pigment with Quinacridone Red/Violet.
Magenta PV19 - Quinacridone Red or Violet. Slightly darker and bluer than their Rose Lake which has the same listed number.
Cadmium Purple PR108 - the sample doesn't look the least purple. Another form of Cadmium Red, looks like Cadmium Red Deep to me.

Cadmium Red PR108
Pyrrolo Red PR255 - this is Pyrrole Scarlet, one of the best of the new synthetic reds: semitransparent, medium- to dark-valued and saturated with very good tinting strength and a superb lightfastness reputation.
Pyrrolo Vermilion PO73 - this is Pyrrole Orange, an opaque, saturated, very lightfast orange pigment with good tinting strength.
Cadmium Red-Orange PO20 - a darker form of PO20 apparently. They don't offer a Cadmium Red Light but this looks like it might occupy about the same hue position.

Cadmium Yellow Orange PO20 - Cadmium Orange.
Cadmium Yellow Deep PY35, PO20 - a blend of Cad Yellow and Orange, darker-valued forms of PY35 are available so I don't know why they didn't use one.
Naples Yellow PW4, PY35, PY42 - should be labelled a hue, a blend of Zinc White, Cadmium Yellow and Mars Yellow.
Brilliant Yellow Deep PW4, PY35, PO20 - a blend of Zinc White, Cadmium Yellow and Cadmium Orange.

Naples Yellow Reddish PW4, PY35, PY42, PO20 - a blend of Zinc White, Cadmium Yellow, Mars Yellow and Cadmium Orange.
Cadmium Yellow Light PY35
Cadmium Yellow Medium PY35
Aureolin PY40 - PY40 is also called Cobalt Yellow. A very transparent light-valued yellow with a so-so lightfastness reputation.

Indian Yellow PY154, PO73 - a mix of Benzimidazolone Yellow and Pyrrole Orange. Should be totally lightfast. You could mix this for yourself from their Primary Yellow and Pyrrolo Vermilion.
Brilliant Yellow Light PW4, PY37 - a blend of Zinc White and Cadmium Yellow Medium.
Lemon Yellow PY184 - this is Bismuth Yellow, a semiopaque, very light-valued and saturated yellow with good tinting strength. Pretty good lightfastness reputation.
Cadmium Yellow Pale PY35

Primary Yellow PY154 - Benzimidazolone Yellow, semitransparent, light-valued and very saturated middle yellow with good tinting strength. Completely lightfast. One of the best modern yellow pigments.
Nickel Yellow PY53 - Nickel Titanate Yellow is usually a green-biased, light-valued yellow pigment with a superb lightfastness reputation. Reasonably opaque and staining.
Baryum Yellow PY31 - good to see this colour on offer, this is Barium Chromate Lemon, a superb light-valued green-yellow with excellent lightfastness.
Golden Green PY154, PG36 - a convenience mix of Benzimidazolone Yellow and Phthalocyanine Green Yellow Shade.

Cinnabar Green PY42, PG7 - a convenience mix of Mars Yellow and Phthalocyanine Green Blue Shade. Should be completely lightfast.
Cadmium Green Pale PY35, PG7 - a convenience mix of Cadmium Yellow and Phthalocyanine Green Blue Shade. Again, should be totally lightfast.
Cadmium Green Deep PY35, PG7 - a darker mix of the same two pigments as above.
Cobalt Green Light PG50 - Cobalt Green is actually PG19, this is Light Green Oxide, similarly weak in tinting strength to Cobalt Green but with better opacity and arguably a more useful hue.

Veronese Green PW4, PG36 - a simple mix of Zinc White and Phthalocyanine Green Yellow Shade.
Mixed Green Deep PY40, PG18 - oh, they're admitting it this time! A convenience mix of Aureolin and Viridian.
Phtalo[sic] Green PG36 - Phthalocyanine Green Yellow Shade.
Blockx Green PG7 - Phthalocyanine Green Blue Shade.

Lamoriniere Green PG17 - this number should represent Viridian but the sample looks very grey and lighter-valued, more like Chromium Oxide Green but even duller.
Thaline Green PW4, PG7 - a simple blend of Zinc White and Phthalocyanine Green Blue Shade.
Mixed Green Light PW4, PY35, PG18 - a convenience mix of Zinc White, Cadmium Yellow and Viridian.
Green Earth PG23 - the real thing, this is a very weak, transparent, dull, greyish green but with excellent lightfastness.

Viridian PG18
Turquoise Green PB36 - this is a form of Cerulean Blue, their colour name appears to include magnesium and zinc which may account for the hue which is much greener than generally associated with this number.
Turquoise Blue PB36 - another form of Cerulean Blue. This one looks to be darker and bluer than the typical colour.
Cerulean Blue PB36 - looks like the common form of this pigment.

Thaline Blue PW4, PB15:1 - a mix of Zinc White and Phthalocyanine Blue Red Shade. Should be very transparent and totally lightfast.
Manganese Blue PB33
Cobalt Blue PB28
Cobalt Violet Deep PV14

Ultramarine Violet PV15 - nice to see this pigment on offer. One of the best pigment violets, reasonably priced with a blue-violet hue, it is moderately opaque and very lightfast.
Dioxazine Mauve PV23 - Dioxazine Purple has a mixed reputation for lightfastness and may not be totally reliable. A very dark-valued, unsaturated blue-violet with extremely high tinting strength.
Indigo PB29, PB15, PBk9 - a convenience mix of Ultramarine, one of the phthalo blues and Bone Black. I think a better 'Indigo' is mixed from Burnt Umber and Ultramarine.
Primary Blue PB15:3 - Phthalocyanine Blue Green Shade.

Indanthrene Blue PB60
Cobalt Blue Dark PB74
French Ultramarine Blue Deep PB29 - looks like normal Ultramarine from the sample.
Blockx Blue PB15:1 - Phthalocyanine Blue Red Shade.

French Ultramarine Blue Light PB29 - looks very similar to their deep form of this colour.
Cobalt Violet PV14 - looks to be slightly lighter-valued than their Cobalt Violet Deep and much more reddish.
Manganese Violet PV16
Payne’s Grey PBk11, PB29 - a simple mix of Mars Black and Ultramarine. A more interesting colour can be mixed on the palette from Utramarine and Burnt Sienna.

Brownish Grey PW6, PBk11, PY42 - yep, it's a brownish grey all right. Convenience mix of Titanium White, Mars Black and Mars Yellow.
Ivory Black PBk9 - Bone Black.
Vine Black PBk11 - Mars Black misnamed.
Mars Black PBk11 - hey, here it is again under the right name. Totally lightfast.

All in all a very good range of colours much to my surprise. Looks like Blockx have taken a step up in their selection of pigments and other than the many convenience mixes on offer very little to find fault with.

Funny they don't appear to offer a white though :D

Einion

Midwest Painter
08-12-2001, 10:42 AM
Originally posted by Einion
I found the <A HREF=http://www.blockx.be/en/ensembleen.htm>Blockx</A> site recently and was pleased to see their oil colour swatches are scans of the actual paint full-strength, plus a tint(?). They also very helpfully list the pigments used so out of curiosity I decided to check through them to see if their poor reputation was justified, considering the number of fans they have here. It's good news I'm pleased to say and I thought it would be useful to list the results here.

They are subdivided into groups of four as per their swatches.

Mars Violet PR101
Cassel Earth PBr7
Transparent Brown PBr7, PG18 - a blend of one of the natural earths with Viridian. Should be totally lightfast.
Burnt Umber PBr7

Transparent Mars Brown PR101
Burnt Sienna Light PBr7
Burnt Sienna Deep PBr7
Transparent Mars Red PR101 - the new transparent forms of the synthetic iron oxides are apparently excellent glazing colours. Their lightfastness varies so you may want to to test for yourself to be sure if you want use them in this application.

Brown Ochre PBr7
Mars Brown PR101, PY42, PBk11 - a blend of mars red, yellow and black. Why they didn't just use the genuine article (PBr6) is beyond me as it makes lovely tints and looks a lot more lively than the sample appears to be.
Transparent Yellow Mars PY42 - one of the new synthetic iron oxide pigments. By reputation a superb glazing colour but again you might want to run your own trials as this is a critical test of a pigment's performance.
Mars Yellow PY42 - their version appears to fall about halfway between their Yellow Ochre and Mars Yellow-Orange in hue and value. Should be totally lightfast.

Gold Ochre PBr7
Italian Earth PBr7
Yellow Ochre PY42 - PY42 is Mars Yellow, generally darker-valued and less yellow than Yellow Ochre and the sample seems to bear this out. Totally lightfast but it would be nice to see it named correctly.
Brown Ochre Light PBr7

Venetian Red PR102 - PR102 is really Light Red, lighter-valued and more orange in masstone than the colour generally referred to by this name which the sample appears to bear out. Totally lightfast.
Mars Yellow-Orange PY42 - PY42 is Mars Yellow, sample looks to be one of the darker forms, quite brown in masstone.
Light Red PR102 - another form of PR102, looks to be redder and slightly more saturated than their Venetian Red. Again, completely lightfast.
Mars Red PR101

Capucine Yellow Light PR149, PR101 - a blend of Perylene Red BL (see below) with one of the red earths. The colour is quite distinctly red so the name is fairly misleading.
Capucine Yellow Deep PR149, PR101 - again very red, but looks darker and duller than the above, uses the same pigments probably with more PR101 in the mix.
Rose Madder Pale PR149 - the base pigment used in the above convenience mixes. Perylene Red BL is semiopaque, staining and dark-valued with good tinting strength and a reasonable lightfastness reputation.
Rose Lake PV19 - Quinacridone Red or Violet, looks lighter-valued and redder than their Magenta.

Crimson Lake PR264 - this is Pyrrole Rubine, semiopaque, dark-valued and moderately-unsaturated crimson with reasonable tinting strength and apparently very good lightfastness. By reputation close to the masstone of Alizarin Crimson but not transparent.
Carmine PR264, PV19 - a convenience blend of the previous pigment with Quinacridone Red/Violet.
Magenta PV19 - Quinacridone Red or Violet. Slightly darker and bluer than their Rose Lake which has the same listed number.
Cadmium Purple PR108 - the sample doesn't look the least purple. Another form of Cadmium Red, looks like Cadmium Red Deep to me.

Cadmium Red PR108
Pyrrolo Red PR255 - this is Pyrrole Scarlet, one of the best of the new synthetic reds: semitransparent, medium- to dark-valued and saturated with very good tinting strength and a superb lightfastness reputation.
Pyrrolo Vermilion PO73 - this is Pyrrole Orange, an opaque, saturated, very lightfast orange pigment with good tinting strength.
Cadmium Red-Orange PO20 - a darker form of PO20 apparently. They don't offer a Cadmium Red Light but this looks like it might occupy about the same hue position.

Cadmium Yellow Orange PO20 - Cadmium Orange.
Cadmium Yellow Deep PY35, PO20 - a blend of Cad Yellow and Orange, darker-valued forms of PY35 are available so I don't know why they didn't use one.
Naples Yellow PW4, PY35, PY42 - should be labelled a hue, a blend of Zinc White, Cadmium Yellow and Mars Yellow.
Brilliant Yellow Deep PW4, PY35, PO20 - a blend of Zinc White, Cadmium Yellow and Cadmium Orange.

Naples Yellow Reddish PW4, PY35, PY42, PO20 - a blend of Zinc White, Cadmium Yellow, Mars Yellow and Cadmium Orange.
Cadmium Yellow Light PY35
Cadmium Yellow Medium PY35
Aureolin PY40 - PY40 is also called Cobalt Yellow. A very transparent light-valued yellow with a so-so lightfastness reputation.

Indian Yellow PY154, PO73 - a mix of Benzimidazolone Yellow and Pyrrole Orange. Should be totally lightfast. You could mix this for yourself from their Primary Yellow and Pyrrolo Vermilion.
Brilliant Yellow Light PW4, PY37 - a blend of Zinc White and Cadmium Yellow Medium.
Lemon Yellow PY184 - this is Bismuth Yellow, a semiopaque, very light-valued and saturated yellow with good tinting strength. Pretty good lightfastness reputation.
Cadmium Yellow Pale PY35

Primary Yellow PY154 - Benzimidazolone Yellow, semitransparent, light-valued and very saturated middle yellow with good tinting strength. Completely lightfast. One of the best modern yellow pigments.
Nickel Yellow PY53 - Nickel Titanate Yellow is usually a green-biased, light-valued yellow pigment with a superb lightfastness reputation. Reasonably opaque and staining.
Baryum Yellow PY31 - good to see this colour on offer, this is Barium Chromate Lemon, a superb light-valued green-yellow with excellent lightfastness.
Golden Green PY154, PG36 - a convenience mix of Benzimidazolone Yellow and Phthalocyanine Green Yellow Shade.

Cinnabar Green PY42, PG7 - a convenience mix of Mars Yellow and Phthalocyanine Green Blue Shade. Should be completely lightfast.
Cadmium Green Pale PY35, PG7 - a convenience mix of Cadmium Yellow and Phthalocyanine Green Blue Shade. Again, should be totally lightfast.
Cadmium Green Deep PY35, PG7 - a darker mix of the same two pigments as above.
Cobalt Green Light PG50 - Cobalt Green is actually PG19, this is Light Green Oxide, similarly weak in tinting strength to Cobalt Green but with better opacity and arguably a more useful hue.

Veronese Green PW4, PG36 - a simple mix of Zinc White and Phthalocyanine Green Yellow Shade.
Mixed Green Deep PY40, PG18 - oh, they're admitting it this time! A convenience mix of Aureolin and Viridian.
Phtalo[sic] Green PG36 - Phthalocyanine Green Yellow Shade.
Blockx Green PG7 - Phthalocyanine Green Blue Shade.

Lamoriniere Green PG17 - this number should represent Viridian but the sample looks very grey and lighter-valued, more like Chromium Oxide Green but even duller.
Thaline Green PW4, PG7 - a simple blend of Zinc White and Phthalocyanine Green Blue Shade.
Mixed Green Light PW4, PY35, PG18 - a convenience mix of Zinc White, Cadmium Yellow and Viridian.
Green Earth PG23 - the real thing, this is a very weak, transparent, dull, greyish green but with excellent lightfastness.

Viridian PG18
Turquoise Green PB36 - this is a form of Cerulean Blue, their colour name appears to include magnesium and zinc which may account for the hue which is much greener than generally associated with this number.
Turquoise Blue PB36 - another form of Cerulean Blue. This one looks to be darker and bluer than the typical colour.
Cerulean Blue PB36 - looks like the common form of this pigment.

Thaline Blue PW4, PB15:1 - a mix of Zinc White and Phthalocyanine Blue Red Shade. Should be very transparent and totally lightfast.
Manganese Blue PB33
Cobalt Blue PB28
Cobalt Violet Deep PV14

Ultramarine Violet PV15 - nice to see this pigment on offer. One of the best pigment violets, reasonably priced with a blue-violet hue, it is moderately opaque and very lightfast.
Dioxazine Mauve PV23 - Dioxazine Purple has a mixed reputation for lightfastness and may not be totally reliable. A very dark-valued, unsaturated blue-violet with extremely high tinting strength.
Indigo PB29, PB15, PBk9 - a convenience mix of Ultramarine, one of the phthalo blues and Bone Black. I think a better 'Indigo' is mixed from Burnt Umber and Ultramarine.
Primary Blue PB15:3 - Phthalocyanine Blue Green Shade.

Indanthrene Blue PB60
Cobalt Blue Dark PB74
French Ultramarine Blue Deep PB29 - looks like normal Ultramarine from the sample.
Blockx Blue PB15:1 - Phthalocyanine Blue Red Shade.

French Ultramarine Blue Light PB29 - looks very similar to their deep form of this colour.
Cobalt Violet PV14 - looks to be slightly lighter-valued than their Cobalt Violet Deep and much more reddish.
Manganese Violet PV16
Payne’s Grey PBk11, PB29 - a simple mix of Mars Black and Ultramarine. A more interesting colour can be mixed on the palette from Utramarine and Burnt Sienna.

Brownish Grey PW6, PBk11, PY42 - yep, it's a brownish grey all right. Convenience mix of Titanium White, Mars Black and Mars Yellow.
Ivory Black PBk9 - Bone Black.
Vine Black PBk11 - Mars Black misnamed.
Mars Black PBk11 - hey, here it is again under the right name. Totally lightfast.

All in all a very good range of colours much to my surprise. Looks like Blockx have taken a step up in their selection of pigments and other than the many convenience mixes on offer very little to find fault with.

Funny they don't appear to offer a white though :D

Einion

Thanks Einion,

I've learned a new way to look at paints.

Degas5
08-12-2001, 12:01 PM
Einion, You must try a tube of Blockx paint when you can. In some cases, I find it preferable to Old Holland. The only drawback that I see in Blockx is their relatively limited range of colors if you are comparing it to OH. They do offer whites and their mixed white is unbelievably beautiful paint. I wouldn't go by the color representations online because their yellow ochre is the cleanest, clearest I've ever seen and so is their ultramarine violet. I don't know where the name capucine yellow comes from, but it is distinctly red; no doubt about it. Vasari paint has a website and you can check out their capucines and they look similar. It is also a very lovely, soft red, much like Terra Rosa is. Much weaker tinting than other earthy reds and transparent. Have you tried Robert Doak's paint? I just got his list of paints and mediums and would like to try them. He has many colors that aren't available commercially and 7 whites!

mirza
08-18-2001, 06:58 PM
sorry, just figuring this out.

robinsn
11-29-2001, 03:02 PM
Great information, Einion! Thanks!

Einion
11-29-2001, 03:46 PM
You're welcome, hope it's of some help.

Einion