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ProfessorGreibowitz
01-25-2004, 01:17 AM
Found a pic of a painting I did for my boss several months ago. He had a 4" B&W pic of a guy trying to pull an iceberg in a little row boat. I painted it 2' x 3'. He paid me a fair price for it. Airbrushed acrylic on portrait grade canvas. I added a detail shot so you can see the boat and rope. This pic is of it b4 I finished. I added another rope.


Comments/critiques welcomed.



Tim

Leaflin
01-27-2004, 03:08 PM
WOW Tim this is fantastic!!!
I had a look at this last night but didn't have the time to comment.

I like everything about it!
The way you have handled the lighting is superb, and I can almost feel the crispness in the air.

Good job the guy in the boat can't see what's under him :D

ProfessorGreibowitz
01-27-2004, 08:45 PM
Hi, Leaflin,

Thanks for the compliments! I forgot to add.. it's airbrushed with regular brush work for the boat, waves and top iceberg. The rope was achieved by ... ohhh this is cool. This might actually help someone.


How I got the rope curve and thickness:

I took a thin strip of frisket and put on the painting where the rope would be. I took braided fishing line, cut it to length and actually taped the ends with painters masking tape to the frisket so the fishing line was curved and in the exact shape as what I wanted for my rope. I then took a Pitt artist pen (B tip, but any pencil, pen might do) and drew directly under the fishing line and then removed the frisket and cut that line with an exacto. That gave me the curve I needed and when you spread the two pieces of frisket apart, that gave the thickness of the rope! (hehehhe I thought I was smart. lol)


Then, with a pencil, I shaded the underside of the rope after airbrushing through the frisket to give it some roundness.


Anyway, compositionally, it doesn't appeal to me [too flat] but it was a copy of another picture he liked so I don't care so much about that. I am proud of the piece overall. The berg looks good n cold near the water. Just add some light aqua and it makes it icy blue/green.


OH! I used the Art Mask frisket and not Frisk and I will tell you, it worked GREAT! On that canvas it held in place (no underspray) and yet came off so smoothly when I pulled it off and NO paint came off. I highly recommend this stuff for canvas masking.



Thanks for commenting.


Tim

jocelynsart
02-01-2004, 08:20 AM
I just love this!!!!! That iceburg is so surreal! The water surface is amazing.
:clap: Jocelyn

ProfessorGreibowitz
02-01-2004, 12:58 PM
Thanks Jocelyn!

There is a prob with the surface. I lost my reasoning skills somehow for a moment and used Createx aqua color like an idiot and it cause a problem where PART of the surface is reflecting more light. Well, since I didn't cover it with clear, it is noticeable at certain angles and even in this pic you can see a slight seam where it changes and what seems to be the front edge of the iceberg under the surface. But I was afraid to cover it with clear. Never did it before and i spent a lot of time on it so... just left it vulnerable. I told the guy it needs to be protected some way. Ah well. I used clear for the first time on the portrait I did so I guess I'm initiated now. heheheh


Thanks again.

Tim

Yokovich
02-09-2004, 01:25 PM
goes without saying great sense of depth
love the imagery but I have to say this feels really "futile" to me! does the fella who commissioned this feel it's................. heroic?

ProfessorGreibowitz
02-09-2004, 08:49 PM
Hello, celestia.


There are some people who want to believe at any cost - including the facts. I am not one of them. I am a realist. I am not a pessimist or optimist. I am pragmatic and I operate within the realm of reason, science, cause/effect, etc. If it can be supported with substantial evidence, it is only someone's theory and at that point is not directly relevant (doesn't directly affect me) even if true. So, without being too specific, yes, he feels that the painting is some sort of symbol or allegory for those (heros) who did not give up even when it seemed impossible.

We forget that there are real limits and to think that the man could move that amount of weight with the tiny force of rowing is completely absurd. The ice will move him but not vice-versa. Now, if he was in a swimming pool, maybe that'd be different. But to the guy who wanted the painting, it has meaning. So, he got what he wanted and so did I. :D



Thanks for commenting!

Tim

ProfessorGreibowitz
02-10-2004, 12:14 AM
Correction: I meant to say if it CAN'T be supported by a good deal of evidence (or any hard evidence) then I probably won't be buying it.




Sorry for the confusion!


Tim

Keith Russell
02-10-2004, 04:48 PM
There are some people who want to believe at any cost - including the facts.

Sadly, I believe that the above describes 'most' people.

I am not one of them. I am a realist. I am not a pessimist or optimist. I am pragmatic and I operate within the realm of reason, science, cause/effect, etc.

Hmmm, I try to operate within the realm of reason, science, and reality, too. But I don't call myself a 'pragmatist', not at all.

If it can[not] be supported with substantial evidence, it is only someone's theory and at that point is not directly relevant (doesn't directly affect me) even if true.

'Theories' are often supported by a substantial amount of evidence, even if they are also considered as 'truth'. (The theory of gravity, for instance.) I would say that something isn't supported by any evidence, it's only an arbitrary claim. I would also remind people not to believe everything they read, nor everything that they are told.

So, without being too specific, yes, he feels that the painting is some sort of symbol or allegory for those (heros) who did not give up even when it seemed impossible.

We forget that there are real limits and to think that the man could move that amount of weight with the tiny force of rowing is completely absurd. The ice will move him but not vice-versa. Now, if he was in a swimming pool, maybe that'd be different. But to the guy who wanted the painting, it has meaning. So, he got what he wanted and so did I.

I don't think we always 'forget' that there are real limits; I think that we often use visual exaggeration to drive home a point. (I love allegory...) Yes, this inage could be interpreted to mean 'never give up', but it also works as a reminder that some things are beyond us, some things are quite simply not possible, and thus not worth the [wasted] effort.

Thanks for a wonderful explanation both of your epistemology (which I share) and of this painting!

K

ProfessorGreibowitz
02-10-2004, 05:32 PM
Hi Keith!


I guess it was inevitable before some of my personal beliefs seeped out into WC! But I don't make a big deal here about them. I will say my mind if asked.

Epistemology.... Now there's a word seldom heard outside of religious debates. I am pragmatic, or practical and maybe I should add that I can handle theories (gravity, etc.) but as you added, they must have SOME evidence or they become arbitrary claims (um, do you believe in the tooth fairy? She's real, you know. hehe).

Yes, I have no gripe with symbolism, allegory, etc. but as you also said, it works both ways. It can be viewed as a futile attempt at the impossible and a reminder to us not to waste our lives on such.


Anyway, for the record here on WC, I am an ex-Christian who is currently leaning heavily toward the atheist camp. I hope those who disagree with me will at least do what I did and examine the "facts" from ground zero. Kick its tires, put it to the test of those who have studied it professionally from both sides and read it again from the beginning and be sure it all adds up. If something is true (even in the short term) it will hold up under the scrutiny and if not, it won't and we should be striving for truth no matter where it leads. "A faith that cannot withstand a collision with the truth is not worth many regrets." So said one writer a while back.


Sorry for the preaching! :eek: LOL!



Thanks again for commenting.


Tim

Yokovich
02-11-2004, 12:07 AM
an aethiest who preaches and paints inexplicable human quest-ing hmmmm this is too DEEP for me!! LOL

ProfessorGreibowitz
02-11-2004, 12:51 AM
Celestia,


You don't have to be a preacher to preach! DOH! hehehe I have a hard time containing myself sometimes when I am fired up about something.

Why is human questing inexplicable to you? Just curious if you feel that qualities of humans which are difficult to explain scientifically somehow justify the idea of a spirit world or greater power, etc.

(getting OT, I know).

Thanks,
Tim

Yokovich
02-11-2004, 12:39 PM
Celestia,


You don't have to be a preacher to preach! DOH! hehehe I have a hard time containing myself sometimes when I am fired up about something.

Why is human questing inexplicable to you? Just curious if you feel that qualities of humans which are difficult to explain scientifically somehow justify the idea of a spirit world or greater power, etc.

(getting OT, I know).

Thanks,
Tim

Tim--I was just having some fun here...lol... I have never known anyone who wanted to move an iceberg (at all) let alone under his own power. And we are the sum of our experiences blah blah.. so when I look at this I just think poor guy! he labors under the false impression that he can do this impossible feat. You really have done a bang up job of painting a thought provoking image. Isn't it great to know that each person can look at something like this and have a whole different "take"? To me it is a great visual metaphor for how dumb man is about nature...how he always tries to change things to be "his way"..as if he knows best where this iceberg should be relocated...talk about doh! :)

ProfessorGreibowitz
02-11-2004, 12:54 PM
Celestia,

I agree that this man is not too bright. hehehehe But I guess there are exceptions to almost everything and different ways of looking at a situation. Maybe his wife is trapped between the iceberg tip and another chunk off to the right we can't see? I'd be rowing too if that were the case. hehehehehhehe But what are the odds of that being true? Preeeeetty slim.


Anyway, thanks for the compliments on the painting. I just copied a B&W my boss had and tried to keep the composition identical and just add color. I think the composition isn't great because it's flat. Everything is totally a side view. But... that was how the original was and i didn't care to improvise and modify it. Too scared. hehehehe


Well, chat with you later.


Tim

timmjohnn
02-18-2004, 09:56 PM
looks nice. thumbs up.

ProfessorGreibowitz
02-18-2004, 10:09 PM
Thanks, Timmjohnn!

The owner wanted the ropes darkened because they were having trouble seeing them at a distance (I prob should have known) and so now I'm making them a dark grayish brown. You can really see them now!



Tim

timmjohnn
02-18-2004, 10:11 PM
i just wat to add that this reminds me of my brother(not to bright). on the other hand, mabe he is a genius.

ProfessorGreibowitz
02-18-2004, 10:20 PM
Sometimes genius can be so far ahead that it appears to us who are still in the stone age as insanity or stupidity! hehehehhe I am somewhere in the middle of it all, I think. Not a genius but not the dullest blade in the kitchen. I try hard. I think that can compensate somewhat for not being a genius. Who knows?

I think the boat rower has a leaky boat and he's using one paddle. hehehe


Tim