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Yorky
01-20-2004, 11:38 AM
Isn't it amazing how many times there is a comment about the need for stronger/more consistent shadows (and I'm a frequent culprit :rolleyes: )

Perhaps we should think about a teach-in on the effect of shadows and light in establishing the mood of a painting.

Perhaps take a couple of rather bland reference photographs (I have plenty :D ) and add different shadows in photoshop to show the effect they have?

Doug

lyn lynch
01-20-2004, 11:46 AM
Isn't it amazing how many times there is a comment about the need for stronger/more consistent shadows (and I'm a frequent culprit :rolleyes: )



Hear! Hear!! But I'm a huge proponent for VALUE shifts.

artmom
01-20-2004, 11:51 AM
Doug! What a great idea! And you are so good with Photoshop. A thread on this, discussing how shadows would fall using different light sources would be of great help to me. :clap: :clap: :clap:

Thanks!

Lyn

Sharon Douglas
01-20-2004, 11:56 AM
Great idea.
looking forward to seeing YOUR lesson. :evil:

Bjo
01-20-2004, 12:15 PM
I would love to have a lesson on this!!!!!
Thanks

Yorky
01-20-2004, 01:00 PM
I could probably find a landscape with buidings taken in dull weather. Anyone got a still life with flat illumination?

Doug

maryrose
01-20-2004, 01:07 PM
I need this lesson!

KansasLady
01-20-2004, 01:15 PM
Great idea!
Not just landscape, but I need info on leaf shadows, people shadows, and are shadows hard edged or soft edged. Are shadows blue, or purple, or a variation on the color of the "ground"?
Bring it on! :clap: :clap: :clap:

Rosemarie
01-20-2004, 02:09 PM
What a great idea! Will you also bring up high-key and low-key?

pampe
01-20-2004, 02:40 PM
Sounds good, Doug...please continue

billyg
01-20-2004, 02:44 PM
Funny this thread should come up, just been reading about shadows and how they have always been a problem. Mainly useed to be constructed in Blacks and greys until people started noticing the colour within , eg Impressionisits. Best comment on shadows as it being like walking into a dark room and as your eyes become accustomed to the gloom you start to see things for even there tiny amounts of light penitrate . Other comments are that as you paint shadow colours your paintigns become more alive. Deep luminous shadows cause lights to look more brilliant so that the picture sparkles . Getting colours into shadows helps to maintain the tonal balance whih inturn helps to makee the painting three dimensional . In general, shadow colours are less intense than lights although in the first place, they are determined by the nature of the local colour of the object in shadow. Very often you will find that outdoor shadows look different from how you THINK they ought to look. The secret is to paint what you see. Two examples given are the shadow on a girls dress cast by her head due to the sun is a more intense blue than her dress , as it takes on the reflection of the sky. Also the childs ear is bright red as the sun shines through the thin part of the ear and reflects on the blood cells inside. (We have all shone a torch through our hands at sometimes LOL ). Final comment in the reading was Painting a shadow in a deeper colour than the local colour poses a problem for many beginners who worry that their subject may cease to be recognisable. Remember deep colourful shadows add an extra dimension to a painting. Dont be afraid to exagerate your shadow colours slightly.
Hope it helps (Im just as bad as everyone else by the way, ask Hugh LOL.)
Billyg. :D :angel: :evil:

Yorky
01-20-2004, 03:07 PM
Lots of good suggetions here.

I reckon we need volunteers to demonstrate different kinds of shadows.

I'll volunteer to do building shadows.

Anyone?

Perhaps we should start a new thread called "Shadow Demos" or something?

Doug

wasp
01-20-2004, 03:13 PM
Hi All,

Here's a start with a shadow picture.
The image is too large to load here in the forum to get any benefit from and I haven't had time to sort out how to upload stuff yet.
www.paintdoodles.com/shadows.htm

Hope this page may help some a little.

Peter

Yorky
01-20-2004, 03:17 PM
Nice one, Peter - a bit of advice with it too!

Doug

pampe
01-20-2004, 07:22 PM
I'm thinking that this is a good example of the painting being ABOUT shadows.....

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Jan-2004/4054-SDARCHES.jpg

artmom
01-20-2004, 11:36 PM
Peter, thank you for that great link!

Pam, wonderful example of the importance of shadows.

Lyn

laudesan
01-21-2004, 02:08 AM
I have book marked this thread!!

Peter I see from your example that the shadows where the flower touches the wall are a deeper shadwe of the flower, but where they don't touch the the wall the are the flower colours opposite..

What a great demo..

DOUG :clap: :clap: :clap:

Great thread ..more .... more........ :D

CharM
01-21-2004, 08:29 AM
Hi Doug... I'm so glad that you've started this thread... It's made for interesting discussion already... Since I have great difficulty with shadows, I'll be following along closely... Your thread did prompt me to do a search on the internet about painting shadows and here are a few links:

http://www.johnlovett.com/shadows.htm

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/1805/264/ (right here on our own website by our own Jackie Simmonds!)

http://maryspires.com/Tutorials.htm

http://www.tonyvanhasselt.com/tips/tip0701.htm

http://www.geocities.com/~jlhagan/lessons/mainmenu.htm

There were many, many more... Putting all this information into a cohesive thread for watercolour, including examples and exercises, will be a real challenge... I haven't read through all the links above, but have bookmarked them for my own personal study... watching and learning...

laudesan
01-21-2004, 09:05 AM
Char those are interesting sites, especially the Tony Van Hasselt one :)

Thank you for posting them..

madmum
01-21-2004, 09:32 AM
This is going to be extremely informative and useful to me, since the weather here is seldom sunny enough for strong shadows. Thanks for starting it, Doug!

Ruth

wasp
01-21-2004, 11:20 AM
Hi JJ

The shadows cast that are distant from the flowers are lit only by the blue/purple of the sky rather than sunlight. This is mostly the case in outdoor subjects. i.e. where there is no influence from the colours reflected into shadows from nearby objects, the object in shadow is coloured by blue/purple from the sky. This colour is a good starting point as a glaze for 'sky lit' shadows. If the shadow starts at the base of a building, for example, bung some of the building colour in to the mix at that point blending to the pure blue/purple as distance increases.

Hope this helps.

Peter

Yorky
01-21-2004, 11:34 AM
Super references, Char. Especially the Tony Van Hasselt one.

Looks as if a demo by me might not be necessary with all the help coming in :D

Doug

CharM
01-21-2004, 11:45 AM
Super references, Char. Especially the Tony Van Hasselt one.

Looks as if a demo by me might not be necessary with all the help coming in :D

Doug

...ummmm... you don't get off that easy my talented friend!... In my very limited way, I was trying to help... :D :D :D

pampe
01-21-2004, 03:46 PM
*thinking we still need a buiilding demo*


Doug................. ;)

madmum
01-21-2004, 04:13 PM
Doug, I think we specifically need a demo of how to change flat lighting of buildings to strong indications of sun/shade :D I struggle so much with flat lighting in cityscapes etc. that a lesson in invention of shadows will be extremely useful!

Peter, I love your example, reflected colour in shadows is vital to make them believable.

Char, your links are fantastic, thank you!

Ruth

ale.l
01-21-2004, 04:36 PM
What a great thread! I have a lot of catching up to do.
Will follow this intensly!

laudesan
01-21-2004, 09:40 PM
Hi JJ

The shadows cast that are distant from the flowers are lit only by the blue/purple of the sky rather than sunlight. This is mostly the case in outdoor subjects. i.e. where there is no influence from the colours reflected into shadows from nearby objects, the object in shadow is coloured by blue/purple from the sky. This colour is a good starting point as a glaze for 'sky lit' shadows. If the shadow starts at the base of a building, for example, bung some of the building colour in to the mix at that point blending to the pure blue/purple as distance increases.

Hope this helps.

Peter

That does help, thank you very much :)

yahooserious
01-21-2004, 10:16 PM
Yes, Doug....I'm too tired to post in the wash tonight, but I DEFINITELY need shadow help....Do the teach-in, please!!!

Hopefully I'll see everyone later than usual in the a.m.

Emilie

Yorky
01-22-2004, 04:36 AM
I haven't time to a demo yet, but here is a recent painting before and after applying shadows. You have to agree that without shadows it is "flat" and uninteresting. The shadows are imagined btw this was a compilation of 2 photographs taken on a dull day with three figures added.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Jan-2004/1046-WiganPierWashes.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Jan-2004/1046-Wigan-PierFramed.jpg
Here's one of the photos - dull ain't it?
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Jan-2004/1046-WiganOrwellphoto.jpg

Doug

Neeman
01-22-2004, 06:54 AM
Doug,
Go for it ,,,please.

According to all the C&C I get I need it!!
Why are so many folk timid when it comes to shadow???

Which colors are used for shadows?

I have seen folk here use dio violet for an under-wash for shadow.
Are there other colors??
I have seen a transparent perylene maroon suggested.
How ,when and where?
Does this mean painting the shadow first?

Can we name the types of shadow, and what the difference is.
Direct and reflected etc.


Peter,

When you say "The shadows cast that are distant from the flowers are lit only by the blue/purple of the sky rather than sunlight." do you mean that purple will be the natural local shadow color, and
blue the natural atmospheric color?

Thanks,
Neeman.

wasp
01-22-2004, 02:08 PM
Hi Neeman,

When you say "The shadows cast that are distant from the flowers are lit only by the blue/purple of the sky rather than sunlight." do you mean that purple will be the natural local shadow color, and blue the natural atmospheric color?

Daylight colours - bright sunlight:
Shadow colour when it has no influence from reflected light from other objects are only lit by the reflected light from the sky. The colour from the sky in the shadow is modified by the atmosphere that it travels through, usually making it slightly warmer (towards purple) than the blue of the sky. So, yes a blue leaning towards purple, is the natural shadow colour on bright sunlit day.

Other outdoor conditions:
These colours can change depending on the condition and colour of the sky, the time of day and the place on earth that you are. (the amount of atmoshere through which the light travels)

Hope this helps

Peter

Neeman
01-22-2004, 04:05 PM
Peter,
Thanks, but...
Sorry but I am not clear.

I understand the color of a shadow is modified by the reflected light of other near objects, eg a white cup on a blue table cloth.

When you say "a blue leaning towards purple, is the natural shadow colour on bright sunlit day." that would be dio violet with ultramarine or Phalo blue RS?
And then in the distance the shadow would be blue?

But what is not clear to me....

"Shadow colour when it has no influence from reflected light from other objects are only lit by the reflected light from the sky"

What is reflected light from the sky?
Why is it not direct light?
Perhaps I don't understand what you mean by reflected light here.
Is there a difference between the shadow of direct sunlight and the shadow of light from the sky?
If so how will it show in colors of shadow?

Thanks for your patience!!!!

Neeman.

wasp
01-22-2004, 05:38 PM
Hi Neeman,

On a bight sunny day the colour of the shadow is the blue of the sky (whatever blue that is) plus some red. e.g. if its an Ultramarine sky the shadow is ultramarine plus Permanent Alizarin Crimson or similar.

The colour in the sky comes from the light reflected from the earth into the atmosphere (predominantly blue from the oceans). This is bounced (reflected) back to illuminate the shadow so it's predominantly blue light.

The light from the sun, when high, is predominantly white. This directly lights things not in shadow.

Hope this helps.

Peter

laudesan
01-22-2004, 06:22 PM
Peter this is excellent learning stuff......THANKYOU :)

Neeman
01-23-2004, 01:40 AM
Peter,
Got it thanks!
Neeman.

Neeman
01-27-2004, 03:19 AM
Guys,

I am just kicking this up to the top of the list to remind all of you who know about shadow stuff.
Please put in your 2 cents.
All help will be greatly appreciated for all to learn.

Shadow is the third dimension.

Thanks,
Neeman.

Yorky
01-27-2004, 03:34 AM
Haven't forgotten - just tied up with a kitchen renovation!

Doug

Neeman
01-27-2004, 10:59 AM
Doug,

I was not aiming at you!
Having been a builder I know what it is to do a kitchen renovation.
You need all the trades for a job like that.

Neeman.

ArtistGary
01-27-2004, 12:01 PM
Doug: Great post. I certainly can use all the help possible with shadows.

Char: Love the links, especially Tony Van Hasselt's.

Peter: Outstanding suggestions. Thanks.

aquila
01-31-2004, 11:45 AM
Pretty new to this but I was intently lurking on this very interesting thread when all of a sudden it ended. I was just wondering if the discussion has moved on to somewhere else.

Yorky
01-31-2004, 12:20 PM
Nope - still here :D - just busy painting, fitting kitchen etc.

I'll get back to it soon.

Doug

dcorc
01-31-2004, 12:33 PM
Hi Neeman,

On a bight sunny day the colour of the shadow is the blue of the sky (whatever blue that is) plus some red. e.g. if its an Ultramarine sky the shadow is ultramarine plus Permanent Alizarin Crimson or similar.

The colour in the sky comes from the light reflected from the earth into the atmosphere (predominantly blue from the oceans). This is bounced (reflected) back to illuminate the shadow so it's predominantly blue light.

The light from the sun, when high, is predominantly white. This directly lights things not in shadow.

Hope this helps.

Peter

Hi Peter

while what you say about illumination within shadowed areas and directly illuminated areas is correct, the explanation for the blue colour of the sky is a bit more complex.

see http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/atmos/blusky.html for a set of diagrams and notes which explain it very clearly!

Dave

wasp
01-31-2004, 08:11 PM
Hi Dave,

while what you say about illumination within shadowed areas and directly illuminated areas is correct, the explanation for the blue colour of the sky is a bit more complex.

Yes. it certainly looks like it from that reference.
Good read that thanks.

laudesan
02-01-2004, 03:06 AM
Here is a LINK (http://painting.about.com/cs/landscapes/) that you might find interesting :)

and this one........Light Source and Shadows (http://painting.about.com/library/weekly/aalightdirectiona.htm)

Shadows (http://worldofwatercolor.com/tips/tips3.htm)

Techniques for Painting Light and Dark.. (http://howtopaintavermeer.fws1.com/index.htm) Paage 14..

This is also Interesting (http://howtopaintavermeer.fws1.com/index.htm)

Painting Dark to Light in watercolor (http://www.watercolor-online.com/Articles/Backwards/backwards.html)

laudesan
02-01-2004, 04:38 AM
Ooooooooh I ran out of time :D

Singer Sargent really knew how to paint!!!!!

THIS (http://www.jssgallery.org/Paintings/Lights_and_Shadows_Corfu.htm) John Singer Sargent's Lights and Shadows, Corfu .. Is just Magnificent !!

Yorky
02-01-2004, 12:17 PM
I've just about finished a painting of the fountain at Hospital at San Juan de Dios, and I posted a picture showing how I usually work out my shadows.

Normally I would draw pencil lines on my painting, but I had the ide of printing out one of the WIP photos and testing the shadows on there:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Feb-2004/1046-FountainWIPshadows.jpg

First decide on the sun direction and draw a line on the ground to get the direction of the shadows. Each pole or building shadow will go parallel to this line. Then choose the sun angle and draw the sun angle from the highest point of each object until it hits the ground. This defines the extent of your shadows.

Doug

maryrose
02-03-2004, 09:44 AM
Fabulous discussion here...I get especially confused when trying to determine shadow colors when painting indoor subjects. I think it is determined by the warmth or coolness of the light? Hmm...looks like a morning of research :)

Doug...With the New Robin buildings going up soon...Your instruction is so VALUABLE...perfect timing for me!!

Also...great links...could get lost in cyberspace.....

Leafy
02-03-2004, 10:32 AM
I, too, have been lurking on this thread because I know shadows are so important...it's going to take some time for me to examine all the great URL references, 'specially on dial-up...

But I'm going to take a minute of your time to gripe ! It is snowing so hard here that there are no shadows....it's darn near a white-out!...

phooey!

JanJones
02-03-2004, 09:38 PM
Doug, thanks so much for this thread, it sure has helped me and I sure need it. The demo of the tour boat and bridge really helps. I will keep watching for any more information that comes along on shadows. Jan

Yorky
02-04-2004, 11:44 AM
Here's an example of adding shadows and sunlight to drastically alter the mood of a scene which I previously showed in the Computer Composition thread and thought might be useful to include here.

Lincoln Cathedral Approach

On a recent visit to Lincoln I took a good few photos, but some were spoilt by the dull day.

This picture of the approach to Lincoln Cathedral deserved better - it has already been used as reference by Georgia:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Nov-2003/1046-LincolnCathedralApproach.jpg

So in Photoshop Elements I enhanced the brightness and contrast overall using Ehance/Adust Brightness/Contrast/Levels then brought in sunlight by selecting the sky and pasting in a sky from my library of skies (I always photograph nice skies). I then used the clone tool to remove the car.

I then used the polygon selection tool to select areas I wanted to be in shadow, then used Enhance/Adust BrightnessContrast/Brightness and reduced the brightness of these areas by 30%. For tricky areas such as down the side of the cathedral towers, chimneys etc I used the brush selection tool and did the same. For people shadows, tree shadows I used the "Burn" tool. Finally I selected the face of the buildings on the left and enhanced the contrast even more to make the colours brighter;_
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Nov-2003/1046-LincolnCathedralAfter.jpg
The effect is 100% better than the original IMHO:

Doug

FriendCarol
02-08-2004, 09:11 PM
Billyg. :D :angel: :evil:
Okay, I just have one question: What's the origin of that phrase I see in your neighborhood so frequently: "Paint like a millionaire"? I searched the site for it, but couldn't seem to find an article with that title....

All right, I probably do have other questions, to be honest, but that'll do for now. I've been reading library books about watercolor for the past year while saving up to buy new paints (have them now!) and brushes (yes!) and Ott-lite so I can paint any time, no matter how overcast the day (yes, that too --what can I say, it's been a good month on eBay!) So I'm feeling stuffed full of technical knowledge and how-to's, and just want to paint with all my lovely new tools. Will have to buy new paper soon, though!

One author (some title with the phrase "brilliant watercolors" in it, I think) does shadows first (chapter with a title something like "disappearing purple"), and I've been trying this approach, and really like it for some types of picture. It helps me remember that form is the result of light and shadows, as I'm working hard on other stuff (like flat washes and hard/soft edges).
(-8

stephie20
02-09-2004, 05:56 PM
Funny this thread should come up, just been reading about shadows and how they have always been a problem. Mainly useed to be constructed in Blacks and greys until people started noticing the colour within , eg Impressionisits. Best comment on shadows as it being like walking into a dark room and as your eyes become accustomed to the gloom you start to see things for even there tiny amounts of light penitrate . Other comments are that as you paint shadow colours your paintigns become more alive. Deep luminous shadows cause lights to look more brilliant so that the picture sparkles . Getting colours into shadows helps to maintain the tonal balance whih inturn helps to makee the painting three dimensional . In general, shadow colours are less intense than lights although in the first place, they are determined by the nature of the local colour of the object in shadow. Very often you will find that outdoor shadows look different from how you THINK they ought to look. The secret is to paint what you see. Two examples given are the shadow on a girls dress cast by her head due to the sun is a more intense blue than her dress , as it takes on the reflection of the sky. Also the childs ear is bright red as the sun shines through the thin part of the ear and reflects on the blood cells inside. (We have all shone a torch through our hands at sometimes LOL ). Final comment in the reading was Painting a shadow in a deeper colour than the local colour poses a problem for many beginners who worry that their subject may cease to be recognisable. Remember deep colourful shadows add an extra dimension to a painting. Dont be afraid to exagerate your shadow colours slightly.
Hope it helps (Im just as bad as everyone else by the way, ask Hugh LOL.)
Billyg. :D :angel: :evil:


Thank you.........I just wish i had read this before i turned my first painting to mud.still lessons learnt

JudyL
02-11-2004, 04:56 PM
Count me in!

laudesan
03-20-2005, 02:06 AM
Here is an interesting link regarding SHADOWS (http://painting.about.com/od/colourtheory/a/shadows_Impress.htm?nl=1)

The Impressionist Renoir is quoted as saying “No shadow is black. It always has a colour. Nature knows only colours … White and black are not colours.” So if black was to be banished from their palettes, what did the Impressionists use for shadows?



JJ

juneto
03-20-2005, 03:51 AM
This is a Great thread ! I like Peters example. Super! Go for it Yorky!
June :clap:

painterbear
03-20-2005, 05:37 AM
Thanks for bringing this back up. I missed it when it was first posted and it is a very informative thread.

This would make a good topic for one of the Monthly Classes we are having now.

Sylvia

watercolor girl
03-20-2005, 05:08 PM
Was just reading over this thread and found it very interesting. I always have to remind myself that good shadows are a matter of value change (lights and darks) not color change. I have found that using a value chart really helps...

Here is a photo of the value chart I made myself. I first painted the value scale from light to dark in 10 steps. Then I used a hole punch to make a hole in the middle of each value segment...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Mar-2005/57725-scale.jpg

Here is how I use the chart when I paint shadows (sorry the photos are a little out of focus)...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Mar-2005/57725-light.jpg

Above, I'm holding the chart over the "bright" side or the sunlight side of my painting - using the hole to match up the value with my chart.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Mar-2005/57725-dark.jpg

Next, I hold the chart over the shadow side. Again using the hole to match up the correct value. The shadow side should be 4 steps or 40% darker than the sunlight side was. If the shadow is not 40% darker (usually the case) or is more than 40% darker then I know the shadow needs correcting.

Credit to my old college drawing teacher and Jan Kunz for this techique. Hope it helps others too!

Rich Williams
03-26-2005, 04:26 AM
Here are a couple of shadow rules you should keep in mind at all times.
Shadows are strongest closest to the point of origin
Shadows have a weak and a strong side. The strong side is closest to the sun.
There are warm and cool shadows depending on the mood of the painting and the hight of the sun above the horizon.
The higher the sun the the harder the shadow edge...

Rich

Yorky
03-26-2005, 04:45 AM
Hey there Rich where are you?

Doug

laudesan
07-23-2005, 01:28 AM
Arnold has posted this wonderful post on Shadows.. (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showpost.php?p=3718448&postcount=4) Do go check it out!!! :)

Yorky
07-23-2005, 03:06 AM
Yes, wonderful information, would make the basis of a good Classroom (hint to Char to use her CharMs on Arnold :D )

Doug

Arnold Lowrey
07-23-2005, 02:49 PM
I'll try to put something together , Yorky
Arnold
Be a bit of a delay though as I/m starting a watercolour course in norfolk next week
Arnold

lpb
07-23-2005, 05:16 PM
Wow, I am so glad this thread got reactivated.

I have a question.
Form shadows will always be indicated on the side of objects away from the light.
Cast shadows will be constantly changing in sunlight due to the passage of the sun through the sky.
It is essential, therefore to take a “snapshot of the shapes with your drawing to ensure that they are all going in the same direction. Every art exhibition has paintings where the artist has forgotten this and the shadows painted in the morning are going a different way to the ones painted in the afternoon.I understand everything except the last sentence. It seems to me that the morning shadows DO go a different direction than afternoon shadows, because the sun has moved. What am I missing?

Yorky
07-23-2005, 05:32 PM
Arnold is saying that you should take care that the shadows are consistent across the painting. It is better to sketch all the shadows in at the same time as they will move as the sun moves around throughout the day, so the shadows in the morning go in a different direction to those in the afternoon.

Doug

laudesan
07-23-2005, 09:18 PM
Wow, I am so glad this thread got reactivated.

I have a question.
I understand everything except the last sentence. It seems to me that the morning shadows DO go a different direction than afternoon shadows, because the sun has moved. What am I missing?

Arnold is talking about painting outdoors..;)

The shadows will moves as the the moves on..

lpb
07-23-2005, 10:55 PM
I had a brain lapse there. I see he means they shouldn't go different directions in the SAME painting. But if you are doing one painting in the morning and another in the afternoon, then of course the shadows will go in different directions, and that's what I was thinking! Hey, my head is gunked up and I haven't been able to talk since Wed!

Yorky
07-24-2005, 03:50 AM
:D :D :D - it happens to us all ! ;)

Doug

Arnold Lowrey
07-24-2005, 05:26 AM
Here is one where I goofed!
The shadows on the right side towers are a different direction to the rest
I'll have to put it right because it is hanging on the wall of my lounge at the moment and a cringe every time i see this mistake

Arnold
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/24-Jul-2005/47691-St_Georgios_in_Darnold.jpg

robynsin
10-06-2005, 04:38 AM
Very good thread - most appreciated.

robyn

Laurie2
10-06-2005, 07:52 AM
I have saved every page of this thread to my HD (...just in case it disappears...:) It is just so full of stuff that I really need and all those links are soooo useful...but since I can't dash around the net for hours on dialup it will be useful to keep the whole page and just do daily 'trips' :)
You have my vote for a Monthly Class on Shadows :)

pampe
10-06-2005, 10:46 AM
so, is there a monthly on this topic coming up????

laudesan
10-06-2005, 07:41 PM
Ooops..:o

Shadows would make an excellent monthly classroom if some-one puts their hand up to teach it..;)

mmcaloon
10-06-2005, 08:05 PM
JJ - Thank you... thank you ...thank you... for the bump. I needed this. Some I knew but had long forgot and most was new.

A monthly class room oh I would love that. :clap:

laudesan
10-06-2005, 09:28 PM
Here is Sylvia's Thread on Shadows that Glow!!!!!!!!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&postid=1441987#post1441987


:)

Arnold Lowrey
10-07-2005, 12:41 AM
Glad you found it, Judy

I might do a bit more if i have the time
Arnold

laudesan
10-07-2005, 12:46 AM
I didn't find it Arnold.. ?????????????