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View Full Version : Gesso ate my brush


hayley3
08-07-2001, 02:21 PM
I used a varnish brush, and now the brush looks like Phyllis Diller's hair. :)
What do you use to put Gesso on with?
Can I use those paint rollers at Walmart?

Leopoldo1
08-07-2001, 05:55 PM
Originally posted by hayley3
I used a varnish brush, and now the brush looks like Phyllis Diller's hair. :)
What do you use to put Gesso on with?
Can I use those paint rollers at Walmart?

Suzie, I think the problem you had was using a varnish brush. Varnish brushes are typically beautiful delicate instruments that are used to put that exactly layer of varnish on a finished painting. As far gesso application is concerned with, any fairly inexpensive brush would work as long as you are not struggling with picking out hairs afterwards. An analogy I would have would be using a spatula to mix a cake but not to use it to write happy birthday with. :)L

hayley3
08-07-2001, 08:29 PM
Thanks Leopoldo.
I did buy an inexpensive brush. I got it from Walmart. I figured the varnish brush would make a smoother application. And when it said "cleans up with soap and water", I never expected it to frizzle the brush.
Thanks again....

paintfool
08-07-2001, 09:15 PM
Yes, gesso will absolutley kill brushes. It's even really tough on your brushes when using your oils over gesso. this is one of the reasone i'll be exploring alternate priming methods in the near future. I currently use foam rubber 'brushes', with a light sand between coats and a final sand before painting. The foam rubber brushes can be found in any art store but are much more economical by the bag at the hardware store. I've noticed that there are different grades and the ones with the least amount of texture (more dense) seem to work best.
Cheryl

TPS
08-08-2001, 01:19 AM
When using acrylic gesso, keep in mind that it begins drying immediately. You must keep the brush wet at all times. Dip it in water frequently, rinsing out most of the gesso each time. In addition, do not let the gesso go higher than half way up the bristles; definately not into the ferrule (metal part). Use a flip-flop stroke, and never scrub-in the paint. When finished soak the brush in alcohol for a good while, then wash with plenty of water and soap. Sometimes, a dead brush can be reclaimed if soaked in alcohol over night. The gooey result can be combed out with a fine tooth haircomb, and then washed in soapy water and rinsed with lots of clear water.

Midwest Painter
08-08-2001, 02:50 PM
I've been using the same gesso brush for about 5 years. It is a bristle house painting brush I bought at Ace Hardware. I just make sure I get it wet before I use it and clean it with soap and water when I am done.

ldallen
08-08-2001, 07:32 PM
Also good are the small rollers that they use for house painting. Saw it in an instruction somewhere - it work well and is faster.

hayley3
08-08-2001, 08:28 PM
Thanks everyone.
I sure learned alot from just one question.
I guess I should've asked the question before I did it! :)