PDA

View Full Version : The color palette of Richard Schmid ...in his own words...


llis
08-03-2001, 12:25 PM
Here is the complete list of the oil pigments I use today. I don't use all of them each time I paint—my palette would have to be unduly large, and I never require such a huge selection for my paintings. An asterisk (*) marks those that are always on my palette (my basic color group). I use the others for colors in my subject that are beyond the range of my everyday needs:

Windsor & Newton: Cadmium Lemon*
Cadmium Yellow Pale or Aurora Yellow*
Cadmium Red*
Cadmium Scarlet
Cadmium Orange
Yellow Ochre Pale* (I add Cadmium Yellow Pale to this.)
Terra Rosa*
Venetian Red
Permanent Alizarin Crimson
Rembrandt (Talens): Cadmium Yellow Deep*
Transparent Oxide Red*
Viridian*
Cobalt Blue Light*
Ultramarine Deep*
Gamblin: Alizarin Permanent*
Lefranc: Titanium White*
Schmincke: Cobalt Violet Light (Transparent and Opaque)
Cobalt Violet Deep

I come now to the tantalizing new "Modern" colors (as opposed to the time-tested mineral pigments)—the wonderfully brilliant organic paints with designations such as quinacridone, perylene, napthol, dioxazine, indanthrene, and so on. Such high-tech names intimidate me because I am not a chemist and I don't understand them. More importantly, from the standpoint of permanency, they have only been around for a relatively short time, and we have only the manufacturer's reassurance that their new colors will withstand the test of centuries as well as some traditional pigments have.
My problem (if you can call it that) is with the allure of the modern colors. Some of them are definite improvements over the old standard colors, and very desirable additions to my palette (yours too, perhaps). I would like to be able to use them with the same complete confidence as I do the traditionally reliable mineral pigments. To reassure myself, I have subjected some of the new dark transparent reds (designed to replace the old Alizarin Crimson) to my own accelerated light tests—exposing color charts of them to intense sunlight for a year or more (a brutal thing to do to oil paint) to note any change. I'm happy to report that Gamblin™ Alizarin Permanent, and Windsor Newton™ Permanent Alizarin Crimson, have shown not the slightest signs of fading or cracking. I have added both to my current palette.
Robert Gamblin, a painter as well as a color maker, modestly describes his Alizarin permanent oil color as a close approximation to traditional Alizarin, but as far as I can tell, it is a perfect match, and superb not only by itself, but for creating a range of quality reliable blacks when mixed with Ultramarine Blue and Transparent Oxide Red. It also yields excellent purples when mixed with blues, and a nice selection of deep reds when combined with the Cadmium Reds or earth reds. I feel that it closes the "permanence gap" that existed on my palette—that I now have a dependable transparent red that I can use without any hesitation or worries about color loss or cracking.
The W&N Permanent Alizarin is, in fact, a different transparent red from the traditional Alizarin. It is lighter in value, warmer, and far more brilliant as it comes from the tube. It retains its brilliance in mixtures with white or other colors, and thinned with medium as well. However, it lacks the deep value afforded by traditional Alizarin, but it too allows for a very nice spectrum of violets and pure dark red mixtures.
Windsor & Newton materials are available just about everywhere, but Gamblin is not as widely distributed. You can contact them directly at: Gamblin Artists Colors Co., P O Box 625, Portland, OR 97207. The phone there is: 503 235-1945, or on the Internet at www.gamblincolors.com. (By the way, you might want to check out their brochure on reducing or eliminating solvent levels in a painting studio.)

Leopoldo1
08-04-2001, 10:03 AM
Hi Llis,

I discovered Schmid about a year ago and when I first viewed his work I was speechless in comtemplating this man's mastery. I believe he is one of the true living masters of today. His personality is easy, not full of himself and has that rare ability to teach others.

I use his palette today because it makes sense. After reading Alla Prima, his book, I decided to do his color charts only because he stressed over and over again the importance of this procedure in the journey of really learning about color. If one looks closely at Schmids work, one outstanding feature is his use of color, so much of it in the appropriate places, yet suttle enough to fool and please the eye into beautiful reality. His use of colors are outstanding! The idea about doing color charts has now given me confidence and an arsenal of color choices I never had before. With his palette one can mix any color. I finished a alla prima piece of Lupine in the Shade and was able to hit what I was seeing more accurately and quickly by referring to the charts. I am now dragging them around with me in a wooden box for color reference until such time I can walk on my own with color! Below is an example of the charts I completed. Again it is worth the effort. :oL

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Aug-2001/colorcharts.jpg

Einion
08-05-2001, 07:50 PM
I was not familiar with <A HREF=http://www.richardschmid.com/>Richard's</A> work but wow, inspiring stuff. I can't decide if I like his still-lifes more than his landscapes!

I did find the comment under <A HREF=http://www.richardschmid.com/oils.html>Rhododendrons</A> amusing though, marketing ploy anyone? :rolleyes:

Einion

llis
08-05-2001, 09:00 PM
Well, I do doubt it took two tubes..... even if they were extremely small tubes. :)

I guess this is one more item to add to our list of things to look for when browsing antique shows and art supply sources that sell hand ground paints.

llis
08-05-2001, 09:04 PM
Leopoldo:

I was thinking that maybe I might ask Santa to bring me Schmid's book. At $95.00 it is a bit much for me to pay for something that is not extraordinary, but with your post, I think this is the one I would enjoy for many years.

Agree?

Einion
08-06-2001, 09:12 PM
llis, you might try looking for the book on <A HREF=http://abebooks.com/>Advanced Book Exchange</A>, I have had good luck finding secondhand titles for significant savings, even adding the shipping to Europe, which won't be a problem for you.

Einion

LarrySeiler
08-06-2001, 09:25 PM
Schmids work, quite honestly...is the catharsis that gave me courage and the feeling of necessity to reinvent myself from 17 years of the direction in painting I was going.

Larry

Hammer6
01-15-2009, 01:20 PM
You can purchase Alla Prima directly from Schmid's own publishing house. Do a Google search on "Schmid" and you'll find the link. There is a paperback edition for $49.95 that helps put this in reach of any serious artist. I received a copy for Christmas and am more than pleased. It's a high-quality book and the content will be a treasure for years to come.

Davidem
01-15-2009, 01:52 PM
Dupp

oldboy
01-16-2009, 02:44 PM
While Alla Prima is a truly good book and I wouldn't be without it, his books
Richard Schmid Paints Landscapes and
Richard Schmid Paints the Figure

are classics. I was fortunate enough to buy them in the 1970's and while a lot of the pictures are black and white I consider them to be every bit as good as Alla Prima,there are many 'how to' demonstrations and much good advice. Believe he has plans to expand A. Prima to incorporate bits from them.
Yes, they are available on the Internet,but the price is very prohibitive.

TheBaron
01-17-2009, 07:20 AM
llis, you might try looking for the book on <A HREF=http://abebooks.com/>Advanced Book Exchange</A>, I have had good luck finding secondhand titles for significant savings, even adding the shipping to Europe, which won't be a problem for you.

Einion

Cheapest on there is a staggering $132 and a hefty $700 :eek:

lenepveu
01-17-2009, 08:37 PM
More importantly, from the standpoint of permanency, they have only been around for a relatively short time, and we have only the manufacturer's reassurance that their new colors will withstand the test of centuries as well as some traditional pigments have.

This is funny logic since steel has only been around for a short time and it's superior to stone in many ways.

oldboy
01-18-2009, 05:24 PM
ienepveu

Not funny at all, Schmid was summarising whether the 'new' pigments will stand the test of time. It's a shame you didn't read his next paragraph before rushing to your keyboard:)

monkhaus
01-18-2009, 10:14 PM
Well, Einion's comment on pricing is from 2001. But, Richard Schmid will be having a new landscape book come out at some point this year according to his website.

scootypoot
01-23-2009, 10:21 PM
It is a shame that every painter doesn't know about Richard Schmid. Be is the only Artist that I study. Call me crazy.

caliban4
01-26-2009, 02:35 PM
Schmid's book is expensive but it contains more valuable information in it than what I have seen in many other books combined and it has direct and honest value. You have to extract the really valuable instructional stuff from among the general writing. His videos are also pricey but it is interesting to watch his method in operation and he has a great charismatic presence and way of teaching.

caliban4
01-26-2009, 02:41 PM
Hi Llis,

I discovered Schmid about a year ago and when I first viewed his work I was speechless in comtemplating this man's mastery. I believe he is one of the true living masters of today. His personality is easy, not full of himself and has that rare ability to teach others.

I use his palette today because it makes sense. After reading Alla Prima, his book, I decided to do his color charts only because he stressed over and over again the importance of this procedure in the journey of really learning about color. If one looks closely at Schmids work, one outstanding feature is his use of color, so much of it in the appropriate places, yet suttle enough to fool and please the eye into beautiful reality. His use of colors are outstanding! The idea about doing color charts has now given me confidence and an arsenal of color choices I never had before. With his palette one can mix any color. I finished a alla prima piece of Lupine in the Shade and was able to hit what I was seeing more accurately and quickly by referring to the charts. I am now dragging them around with me in a wooden box for color reference until such time I can walk on my own with color! Below is an example of the charts I completed. Again it is worth the effort. :oL

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Aug-2001/colorcharts.jpg

I have started working my way through the charts but I noticed Schmid did not include Venetian red so I am including a 12th column for this as he distingushed between Terra Rosa and Venetian red as a warm and a cool red and used it in some of his videos.

DaveInPA
01-30-2009, 06:05 AM
where do you get those color charts?

caliban4
01-30-2009, 08:40 AM
His charts at set out in his book, Alla Prima. You don't need to buy the book to do the charts and you can also use your own colours that you prefer. The first chart sets out in the first row the colours directly from the tubes and then each lightened with white down for five values in total. Each other chart is one colour that is mixed with each other colour of your palette but with that one colour predominant in the mixes. Each is similarly lightened down for five values in total.

James or Jimmy Jim
02-14-2009, 02:15 PM
I have an expensive copy of Alla Prima ... that is if I ever can find a Jim who is interested. :rolleyes: :D He also signed my other books.

I agree about his old landscape book being very good. After watching him do a demo in 2006, I was studying his painting and noticed a copy of the landscape book in his van. I mentioned it to Nancy and she said that she was reading it. :cool:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Feb-2009/33859-AllaPrima_small.jpg

rltromble
02-20-2009, 07:20 PM
I can't find it under $78 :(

gunzorro
02-20-2009, 07:24 PM
It's right on his website for $49+ shipping! ;)

http://www.richardschmid.com/alla_prima_book_info.htm

James or Jimmy Jim
02-20-2009, 07:30 PM
You can sometimes find his books on eBay. I got his old landscape and figure books for ninety dollars, each. I've also seen them for $1,000 ... definitely not worth that price!

Kevin...
02-21-2009, 07:45 AM
If your ever in Putney Vermont, stop into village arts and say hello to his good friend, The Captain. There are books and videos there as well. If you're lucky, he might be there himself.

http://www.richardschmid.com/cap_dvd.htm


http://www.villageartsofputney.com/Village%20Arts%20of%20Putney%20Website%20%2709/Welcome.html

James or Jimmy Jim
02-21-2009, 08:02 AM
If your ever in Putney Vermont, stop into village arts and say hello to his good friend, The Captain. There are books and videos there as well. If you're lucky, he might be there himself.

http://www.richardschmid.com/cap_dvd.htm


http://www.villageartsofputney.com/Village%20Arts%20of%20Putney%20Website%20%2709/Welcome.html

I've been there twice and know Captain John and Penelope – very nice people.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Feb-2009/33859-33859-Captain_small_2.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Feb-2009/33859-33859-Richard_John.JPG

Kevin...
02-21-2009, 09:33 AM
I've met The Captain a couple of times while I was making deliveries there, and yes, he's a good person. He gave me a tour of the place and showed me some of Richard's works as well as some outstanding works by other artists.

oldboy
02-21-2009, 02:56 PM
Also if your in visiting distance of West Wind Fine Arts, based in d'Alene,Idaho you will see some of his works.

West Wind Fine Arts was formally based in Manchester, Vermont and my Wife and me were spending our second visit and 40th Anniversary in New England and when viewing paintings in the gallery, told Kristen Theis (co-owner) how disappointed we were in not having the time to visit Richard Schmid's retrospective in Pennsylvania.
She immediately suggested that when the gallery closed we were very welcome to visit her and Timothy's house to view some more of Richards work (owned by them)
Cannot thank them enough for there very generous hospitality. On leaving we were presented with a copy of Richards retrospective book.

Any visitor to West Wind Fine Arts, if getting half the attention we received will be delighted, they love talking about his works.

Kevin...
03-29-2009, 10:14 AM
I ordered this book Alla Prima and I'm down to the last chapter. I really like the way things are explained here and I'll read it again. What a great artist and brilliant writer. Finally, I can take a step forward into oils with a clue of what I'm doing.

rltromble
03-30-2009, 12:26 AM
I did buy his book eventually, its an interesting read.

k4pka
04-14-2009, 01:24 PM
His books are easily worth their weight in gold. Such teaching! I too am lucky enough to have a signed copy of Alla Prima!

K.G.
07-10-2009, 06:34 PM
I also am a fan of Mr. Schmid. However, I wonder how you work his charts to find make low intensity versions of colours. In other words, is it necessary to step outside these charts for any reason? I have been trying to develop my understanding of colour theory and when he says in his book that it is not true that mixing with a complement will give you neutral grey and also says that it is not necessary to buy neutral grays for mixing, I wonder about how to achieve the darker values of his charts without relating those colours in a different way. I assume he just picks a deeper value colour for a shade colour from his chart but it seems to be a more random way of picking than knowing that I need, for example, a low intensity, dark value green. Any ideas how to reconcile old theory with his charts? I'd really appreciate your thoughts.

Nosaj
07-10-2009, 07:03 PM
I have the figure painting book, from..1973 I think. Pretty dang good

gunzorro
07-14-2009, 12:27 PM
K.G. -- Schmid uses complementary colors to neutralize his main colors or create greyed-down hues.

I recently finished watching his fourth in series of landscape painting DVDs, "White Pine", which he did off a complilation of images via the computer monitor. Lots of camera focusing on his palette mixing. Very interesting video.

One of the main things I took away from this video is that he seldom "color matches" to the true scene. There is a lot of artistic interpretation on the colors and the image. In fact, the finished image bears little resemblence to the actual scene. I find it fascinating to watch his progress to arrive at his conclusions -- I would have interpreted the scene completely differently, and probably stuggled to make it closer to reality. He even describes his interpretation as Impressionistic, and I find that a good description of his result.

I've seen a number of his videos, but this studio study from existing photos is unusual for using photo reference and spending so much time watching him mix colors on the palette. Worth buying.

For painters more interested in color or scene fidelity, Schmid's approach is not going to satisfy. But for painters with a looser drawing style and less demand for color fidelity, it is an interesting and energetic approach.

LGHumphrey
07-14-2009, 02:23 PM
Thanks for an interesting post, Jim, info that a lot of us Schmid-lovers didn't know.

James or Jimmy Jim
07-14-2009, 03:07 PM
Actually, he said that he doesn't try to match the colours or values on the monitor, as they are not accurate. He depends on his memory, as he has painted those types of scenes/trees many times from life.

gunzorro
07-14-2009, 05:41 PM
James -- That's true, he said that repeatedly during the video. Yet, the painting departs radically from the photo references, not just a bit. I applaud his ability to do so, making a reality better than reality, as he said in words to that effect. But the fact is he changes the colors significantly and adds and omits major details in the subject to produce the lyrical final painting.

I can see why devout adherents to Schmid's approach, and devotees of the Munsell approach to color accuracy might find it awkward to meet in the middle. Personally, I embrace both.

rltromble
07-15-2009, 12:53 PM
Boy this is the thread that keeps popping up, I have read his book and watched 5 of his video since this thread started. :rolleyes: But I agree with Jim (gunzo) on this ( god forbid) :evil: , Richard uses artistic license a lot. Its almost as if he just uses the scene as a starting point. His style of painting is really his style of painting, a kind of rustic impressionism. But it works.
His May video is a good example of this, here is a few snapshots. He deviates from the scene in several places.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Jul-2009/172833-vlcsnap-9263260.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Jul-2009/172833-vlcsnap-9262131.bmp

gunzorro
07-15-2009, 01:19 PM
rltromble -- Ha-ha! Sorry! :) Thanks for posting these great examples.

One of the things I like best about watching his videos is his approach to controlled chaos. He starts each painting with a "mess" on the canvas, and you wonder, "where is this going?". But then he starts wiping, and adding, smearing and defining, and pretty soon the whole thing falls in place (where for you and I, the whole thing would degenerate into an ungodly catastrophe!). ;)

I love his use of unconventional painting tools like paper towels (a favorite of mine for creating textured looks through wiping) and Q-tips -- one use, throw away.

I also admire his concentration on committing to the brush stroke (however shaky it seems as applied, it seems to add a spontaneous magic to the final result) or loaded edge of the palette knife.

James or Jimmy Jim
07-15-2009, 01:32 PM
I was lucky to have been able to watch him paint (and talk :lol:). He went through a full roll of paper towels in a few hours.

LesleyGrindlay
08-15-2009, 12:38 PM
I agree, Richard Scmid is a Living Master and highly respected in the Art World. I stand in awe of his mastery and study his work relentlessly amongst other great living Masters. Visit Art Renewel International and look in the museum section where you'll find a list of Masters of old and including William Bouguereau whom in my opinion the Greatest Painter who ever lived whose work leaves me breathless.

Nosaj
08-15-2009, 03:41 PM
At the risk of..getting booed..and having rotten veggies thrown at me..Im going to go right ahead and say it, because its how I feel..

:breath:

I honestly believe..the painters today..that is..the really great ones..are the best painters to ever live. In short I believe the "BEST" are still alive today, and often feel..the "old masters" were good in their day, but not quite as great as some of those still alive. Richard is a perfect example of this. I think is is partly because...the painters today HAVE the old masters work to learn from.

Ok..you all may begin throwing rotten veggies at me now...;)

llawrence
08-16-2009, 12:51 AM
Nosaj... no veggies from me at least. I've watched some painters work who I think are right up there with the very best ever. The only thing I think artists from yesterday had over artists of today is that they could tell a story in spades - make use of mythology, history and convention wrapped up in a visual composition to communicate at a very high narrative level. Sometime in the twentieth century, "narrative" fell out of favor as being more appropriate for commercial art; and today's fine art, despite the general renaissance of realism and impressionism, at times still suffers for it. But even in this there are some exceptions; Mian Situ comes to mind.

Einion
08-16-2009, 09:20 AM
The thread that would not die! Gonna have to get the stake, holy water and garlic out soon :lol:

Einion

BelgianGirl
08-17-2009, 10:26 AM
Wow, I'm glad this thread was resurrected! I wasn't around here the first time, and this has some great stuff in it. I'm trying to expand my color theory knowledge, and I think doing some of these color charts will be very helpful.

caliban4
09-28-2009, 10:15 PM
The great thing about Schmid is the breadth of his mastery. He is excellent in everything from landscapes to still lifes to portrait and figures. While he seems to work primarily in oils, his watercolor and gouache technique and painting are right up there.

Donald_Smith
09-25-2010, 03:55 PM
I also am a fan of Mr. Schmid. However, I wonder how you work his charts to find make low intensity versions of colours. In other words, is it necessary to step outside these charts for any reason? I have been trying to develop my understanding of colour theory and when he says in his book that it is not true that mixing with a complement will give you neutral grey and also says that it is not necessary to buy neutral grays for mixing, I wonder about how to achieve the darker values of his charts without relating those colours in a different way. I assume he just picks a deeper value colour for a shade colour from his chart but it seems to be a more random way of picking than knowing that I need, for example, a low intensity, dark value green. Any ideas how to reconcile old theory with his charts? I'd really appreciate your thoughts.


KG,

You might try looking RS up, find his webpage and ask, then share the answer here when you get it. I would be surprised if he or an asistant didn't reply. He seems human in his videos. I've asked questions of famous artists before, it might take a while to get a reply, they are busy, but usually it's worth it.

Donald

Mathieu1980
09-26-2010, 05:57 AM
I also am a fan of Mr. Schmid. However, I wonder how you work his charts to find make low intensity versions of colours. In other words, is it necessary to step outside these charts for any reason? I have been trying to develop my understanding of colour theory and when he says in his book that it is not true that mixing with a complement will give you neutral grey and also says that it is not necessary to buy neutral grays for mixing, I wonder about how to achieve the darker values of his charts without relating those colours in a different way. I assume he just picks a deeper value colour for a shade colour from his chart but it seems to be a more random way of picking than knowing that I need, for example, a low intensity, dark value green. Any ideas how to reconcile old theory with his charts? I'd really appreciate your thoughts.
KG,

You might try looking RS up, find his webpage and ask, then share the answer here when you get it. I would be surprised if he or an asistant didn't reply. He seems human in his videos. I've asked questions of famous artists before, it might take a while to get a reply, they are busy, but usually it's worth it.

Donald


The charts in Richard Schmid books only deal with two-color mixes, and only for o small part. A lot of mixes you need when painting will need at least three colors. Or a mix of two colors that is not in the charts (e.g. there are only two versions of cad yellow lemon and ultramarine blue). You can't just take all the color patches from the chart as they are and mosaic them into a painting. So yes, it is often necessary to step outside his charts, but you can still use them in doing so.

It is a lot easier using these charts to come up with a three-color mix than doing the same thing only in your head. Because when you do it in your head, you first have to imagine the two-color mix, keep the outcome in your head, while at the same time you imagine adding the third color. But with the charts you see the two-color mix before you instead of in your head, which is much clearer because you are actually seeing it instead of imagining it. And it is just a lot easier to imagine how all these two-color patches will behave with a third color.

Although when painting, you probably will do it all in your head, those charts are still a good resource to fall back on. And by just looking at them when not painting, you can learn a lot about your pallet.

These charts should be used as the foudation, not as the final results, just my thoughts about it.

Mathieu

Mathieu1980
09-26-2010, 06:27 AM
In Richard's charts, he takes two colors and then only two of all the mixes possible with those two colors, letting one color dominate over the other in each mix.

For example, from the following chart (Cadmium Yellow Lemon and Manganese Blue), he would take only the second and sixth column, or maybe the third and fifth.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Sep-2010/183754-CYL-MB_Chart.jpg

The other mixes -also every one that isn't on this chart- are not in there.

So, of course, every kind of chart has its own limitations.

Einion
09-27-2010, 01:49 PM
You can't just take all the color patches from the chart as they are and mosaic them into a painting.
Good way of putting it.

Einion

gunzorro
09-29-2010, 01:56 AM
Mathieu -- You might be misunderstanding the purpose of the Schmid charts. They aren't intended for color matching or as a comprehensive gamut of the subjects. These simply show the major relationships and tones possible from the palette.

Besides the understanding of paint mixing one gets from the huge exercise of making all these color charts, the other major value Schmid intends is to use them as an overall color harmony "key" to hold up the charts in front of scenes and subjects to get a strong impression of the best set of major colors to develop the painting.

If readers want more or less comprehensive exploration of color variations and graduations, they need to consult the Munsell System of Color Notation and examine the "Big Book" of precision Munsell color chips.

Mathieu1980
09-29-2010, 02:35 AM
Gunzorro, no misunderstanding there. But thanks anyway!

gunzorro
09-29-2010, 09:56 AM
Mathieu -- My apologies. I hope that adds something for the other readers who haven't read the Schmid book, Alla Prima.

Lulu
11-18-2010, 03:18 AM
Have just ordered it from his website.:thumbsup:

11-21-2010, 06:18 AM
Hi , just ordered Alla Prima softcover version, cost $49.95 from Richard Schmids website. Hope this book will help me see the light (and shade) PS: This is my first post .Thanks to Hammer 6 for the info. Regards Cendone.

ChapR
11-30-2010, 08:09 AM
The newest book by Richard Schmid is "The Landscapes" by Stove Prarie Press. The first edition is October 2009. At $125 it is costly but in my opinion, worth every cent. It does not contain much 'written' instruction, but his work is masterful. One will either be inspired or driven to give up painting. This is a wonderful book on the subject and one I am certain any painter of landscapes will treasure.

tobzart
03-04-2011, 06:28 PM
I have just started doing these charts.
But could someone explain to me why he has placed them in that particular order?

Wouldnt it be nicer to switch alizarin and terra rosa putting "browns" together..
Or just placing them in correct hue order.
This is correct hue placement right?
cad lemon
cad yellow pale
yellow ochre pale
cad yellow deep
transparent oxide red
terra rosa
cad red
alizarin permanent
ultramarine blue deep
cobolt blue light
viridian

Ofcourse i could just place them however i want, but i would like to understand the logic, since im pretty much a beginner.

Awesome forum btw =)

oddman99
03-05-2011, 09:05 AM
Tobzart, he placed the colours in the order of their native value as they come from the tube.

tobzart
03-05-2011, 03:09 PM
oddman99 So it was that simple =) Thank you!

I will probably put alizarin next to cad red, just makes more sense to me.

Gigalot
03-07-2011, 07:31 AM
Do not forget "Transparent yellow iron oxide" PY42. A good colour for glazing, also any yellow ocres/sienas (+white) & asphaltum / VanDyke (+black) replacement and Burnt Lake imitation: thumbsup: