PDA

View Full Version : Returning on Ebay


Aselka
01-06-2004, 01:10 AM
I was selling my works on Ebay in 2002 mor or less consistent. I did a little profit, then I quit because i noticed a big fall in sales and i also had a little time to paint. I still listed 2 paintings once in a two months, but I know that it is not enough to keep buyers around.

During my absense from Ebay I entered local gallery and took part in few shows, where my watercolors sold for 200-400 for piece (mostly 8"x10" and 11"x14"), but i had to wait months sometimes to sell one painting.

I wonder how is Ebay now in a terms of making some profit? Did someone else here had an experience to return on Ebay after a year or so? How does it feel?

Right now I painting few high quality, very detailed time taking works. Does it worth to list them on Ebay???

sincerely,

Aselka

ElizaLeahy
01-06-2004, 01:14 AM
Short answer - no. Not if it's time taking and detailed. You will not get out what you put in. eBay is best for quick work, people are out for a bargain and not necessarily for a good piece of art.

But you might find that you want to do some quick sketchy pieces in between your detailed time consuming pieces as a sort of relaxation. If you can turn out pieces quickly, then it's worth listing them.

kjsspot
01-06-2004, 03:28 AM
Eliza's right Aselka. This is my first year that I'll be able to dedicate myself full time to my art. YEAH!! My plan is to refine my ebay as my bread and butter and also combine it with more intensive, more expensive gallery works. I think the two can work together. Diversifying to spread across the markets should theoretically improve the finacial risks and hopefully the profits.

CathyD
01-06-2004, 01:57 PM
Diversifying to spread across the markets should theoretically improve the finacial risks and hopefully the profits.

KerryJo, can you go into more depth with that comment? Thanks!
Cathy

kjsspot
01-06-2004, 02:25 PM
KerryJo, can you go into more depth with that comment? Thanks!
Cathy

Sure. It's the same theory that your portfolio investors take with your investments. The idea is that you don't put all your money in one market. Instead you put a large percentage into lower earning, more stable stock, then a smaller percentage into higher earning less stable stock and an even smaller percentage into a high earning, high risk stock. This provides an even base for interest earnings. Also, even among the different levels, they invest in a variety of companies. That way if one goes belly up, you don't sink along with it.

So, ebay is my first playing field. I sell more work there for less individual profit. Larger quantify with lower individual profit should equal the main base of my income. Along with ebay, one could include sales from things such as cards, prints, and whatever other commercial application of art there is. Perhaps someone would hook up with doing book illustrations, or wallpaper design. Whatever. I would put all these applications of art into this first tier of income.

Then the second and/or third level would be portrait commissions (I'm talking real commissions that are thousands and tens of thousands each, not hundreds.) and gallery sales. Those two applications of art have a greater potential of higher profits on a more limited basis. In other words, they will return large profits, but you may not see many of them.

Keeping your hand in these various markets will allow the opportunity for any of them to really take off. But it also allows more leeway for one of them to go bad. IOWs, you don't want all your eggs in the ebay basket only to find them go belly-up in some kind of dot.com crash. And you don't want all your eggs in the gallery market either. What if the future dries them up and everything goes digital instead? Insert any possible scenario here for all markets.

So, diversify and, keeping your eye on the trends, be willing to adapt. That's my theory toward which I'm working. I've yet to find out how it works in real life application but it sounds good at least! :D

jocelynsart
01-06-2004, 02:42 PM
Hi Aselka: Good luck on returning!
I am giving it a shot on eBay with what I really only love to do, detailed pieces in a realistic style. So, will have to see if it goes ok. It was going not too bad before Xmas. If not then back to portraits mainly. I am giving portraits a break for a bit, so that my time is more my own, to paint for an exhibition in the Summer.
True, large loose and decorative sells better. For me I'd be spending More time on that because I'd have to figure out how to paint like that and well like others do. It'd be too much trail and error and relearning for me. So, I am going to give what I like to do a serious try this yr. Mine are smaller than my personal exhibit oriented pieces so they take me 5-15 hours. I price higher to begin, forego Reserves now, and am happy with my minimum price if they get only one bid. What they bring in an hour is more than my Corporate world job did, so that is a bonus already. Also, they are a good price for a buyer buying original paintings in the style I work in. A Gallery would price them higher for their 40% cut.
eBay is a good opportunity for large exposure than before and also to be able to run one's own business on their own terms and time. Thsi makes things great for everyone else in the family who needs your time.
Good luck to you. :)
Joss

CathyD
01-06-2004, 03:52 PM
So, diversify and, keeping your eye on the trends, be willing to adapt. That's my theory toward which I'm working. I've yet to find out how it works in real life application but it sounds good at least! :D

Hey, that's my Monopoly Strategy!!! I won a lot at Monopoly, because you collect a little here on the small properties, and every once in while someone would land on something a little bigger, and then if you had built up Boardwalk and Parkplace you'd cash in! Anyways, what you are saying makes complete sense to me, KerryJo. I don't see why it wouldn't work. I have been thinking along those same lines, but haven't had the time to invest in my art like I would like. But I can start out working that strategy on a small basis. One more resolution!

Wow, thanks... that was worth asking for the explanation!
Cathy

sandge
01-06-2004, 04:15 PM
Terrific explanation, kerryjo! Thanks so much - that's really given me something to think about! :D

Aselka
01-08-2004, 12:32 AM
Thank You girls for your very useful tips and encouragement!
I will give Ebay one more try with those peices, but I will put a highier price.
If it does not work, I will return to quick and easy works, which is pity because I, like Joselyn really enjoy painting details a lot.

Aselka

kjsspot
01-14-2004, 11:00 AM
Aselka, do both! If you have a few detailed paintings that take you a while to paint, post them along side quicker works or studies. That way you'll have more auctions to post. Don't forget that every auction is like an advertisement for all your other auctions.

And thanks Cathy! Now I'm gonna have to find someone to beat at Monopoly!! :evil:

CathyD
01-14-2004, 01:07 PM
And thanks Cathy! Now I'm gonna have to find someone to beat at Monopoly!! :evil:

I have a "monopoly" investment theory also that I think would work well with ebay. In monopoly, I buy the small cheapy properties first, and strategize what properties to buy ( I don't buy everything I land on). Then when I attain a row of properties, I build up the most inexpensive ones first and then reinvest the cash from those (as people land on them) into the more expensive ones. I am somewhat conservative - I don't spend all my cash in one place, because you never know if you are going to land on someone else's property! Of course luck has a certain amount of play in the game, but since I believe I am lucky, I usually am!

So... how would this work with ebay? Start with the inexpensive paintings that are low in cost and time commitment. Miniatures have worked well for me. Also put on auction paintings that start at 25.00-30.00 ( I usually don't paint any larger than 11x 14). I am going to take the advice of Eliza and KJO and do large paintings too (haven't done that). Make sure you cover your expenses, and take the 'extra' and re-invest in marketing. Like FP's ect.

Now, just a summary of what the 'experts' here have said in the past... have more than just your FP on auction, have other paintings so the FP will drive buyers to them. Stategize when to do FP's (holidays aren't usually good). Be consistent in keeping auctions up and running.

So I guess to summarize my monopoly/ebay strategy-theory: Start small, build, re-invest in marketing and be consistent. Oh, and with all the competition, try to do your best art.

This year I am putting on a ebay 'In Business' hat instead of, my 'Dabbling in ebay' hat. I let you know how my strategy is working.... I better get painting first! :p
Cathy

Bendaini
01-14-2004, 01:50 PM
I'm just starting to sell on ebay, little things, non art at the moment so I can get some feedback points. But I agree witheveryone else. Don't stick the greatly detailed stuff on ebay, especaily if you are already doing the Gallery circets and getting good money for them. Do some sketchy, or quick paintings/drawings that only take a maybe a couple hours and stick them up on ebay. It will be good practice for you, and maybe earn you some extra cash.