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Zarathustra
01-01-2004, 01:01 PM
I've seen a number of threads and plenty of good words spoken about Richard Schmid's alla prima books, so I won't go there, but I'd like to ask if anybody has tried his videos?
I know he will be releasing some DVD instructional discs in the future, but I don't think I have the patience to hold out. I'm torn between trying the Captain's Portrait or Schmid Paints the Landscape - has anybody seen either or both, and is it worth the money?

The U.S. to Pound exchange rate seems particularly good for me to get my purchase in as soon as possible.

MikLNjLo
01-01-2004, 01:28 PM
Worth the money? I believe so. I admire his work and watching him paint has been beneficial and pleasurable. He talks about his technique on both. Because of the time he allows for the video projects he does what he calls color sketches instead of finished works. I'd like to see him spend more time on something developed further but I am not disappointed or dissatisfied with what these two videos offer. It is a relished opportunity to be able to see him at work. I have been looking forward to the next in the landscape series.

If you only want one pick the subject you are interested in. Otherwise I would say the portrait is a better piece for study. The landscape is great also but it is left a little less refined than I see in the bulk of his paintings. It still allows you to see how he works and his technique with a knife/brush combination.

Hope this helps.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jan-2004/24170-rs-deer_crossing.jpg

Deer Crossing by Richard Schmid

Zarathustra
01-01-2004, 03:26 PM
MikLNjLo, I appreciate the reply, I feel more confident about ordering the portrait video now (which was my first choice anyway).
Trying the MOM project has opened my eyes to the difficulty involved with alla prima painting.
I believe his next video is released this Summer? Perhaps the DVD's will be released then too.

James or Jimmy Jim
01-01-2004, 06:05 PM
Man he's good, I just came across his work recently.

I want to have his children ... maybe not, my wife would kill me.:D

Biki
01-02-2004, 04:47 AM
Originally posted by James (or Jimmy Jim)
Man he's good, I just came across his work recently.

I want to have his children ... maybe not, my wife would kill me.:D

LOL - you're a funny fella James.:D

Zarathustra
01-02-2004, 11:52 AM
I don't think Richard Schmid's wife (presuming he's married), would be best pleased either Jim!

I received an email from Stove Praririe Press today, regarding the DVD's...

"Thank you for your inquiry. We expect to have the new landscape video "Richard Schmid Paints the Landscape - June" in early 2004, probably by March or April. This is the second landscape video in the series and it will be in DVD format as well as video.

There are plans to reproduce the two videos that are currently available "Richard Schmid Paints the Landscape - November" (first in the series) and "The Captain's Portrait" available in DVD but, it will be later in the year. My guess is 6 - 8 months from now."

James or Jimmy Jim
01-02-2004, 12:07 PM
He is married to a very talented painter named Nancy Guzik - excellent work also.

I just placed my order for his Alla Prima book - it feels like Christmas again! Now I just have to wait the 2-4 weeks for delivery.

I'm really looking forward to this book. Although there are a lot of really good painters and styles out there, in my opinion, this guy is REAL RAW TALENT.:clap:

Eugene Veszely
01-02-2004, 12:09 PM
By then DVD will be defunct .... and another format will have taken its place !! ;)

Eugene Veszely
01-02-2004, 12:12 PM
Originally posted by James (or Jimmy Jim)
.... in my opinion, this guy is REAL RAW TALENT.:clap:

I would say he is 50+ years of refined talent :)

James or Jimmy Jim
01-02-2004, 12:19 PM
I agree, but many painters go downhill or stop trying as hard when they get older. One of the things I really like about his work is that, in addition to his obvious talent, his paintings are not overworked. He knows where to draw the line (that was bad).:D

Zarathustra
01-02-2004, 02:47 PM
I ordered the book and the portrait video last night. I also sent another email regarding the DVD, and apparently it will contain extras that aren't available on the video. She said Richard hadn't made a DVD before, so these "extras" are the reason for the delay in release.

James or Jimmy Jim
01-02-2004, 07:43 PM
His work, painterly or tighter is just great.

donna726
01-02-2004, 11:20 PM
They emailed me 3 days ago and said I have to wait 2 weeks. and I got it today.

I am not even 1/3 through and I felt like I got more than a whole college painting class's worth.
He is my new mentor!

So if you get the video, please let us know if it is worth it as an addition to the book (which made a dent on my wallet, but...it is really worth it)

Eugene Veszely
01-03-2004, 10:51 AM
Originally posted by Zarathustra
I ordered the book and the portrait video last night. I also sent another email regarding the DVD, and apparently it will contain extras that aren't available on the video. She said Richard hadn't made a DVD before, so these "extras" are the reason for the delay in release.

I am taking the credit for him putting out DVDs :).....it was only after I emailed him about the possibility of the DVD format that he started thinking about releasing them :)

James or Jimmy Jim
01-03-2004, 10:53 AM
Originally posted by donna726
They emailed me 3 days ago and said I have to wait 2 weeks. and I got it today.

I am not even 1/3 through and I felt like I got more than a whole college painting class's worth.
He is my new mentor!


Man, I hope that happens to me too.

What did you like about the book? Don't tell me the ending though.:D

TeAnne
01-03-2004, 11:04 AM
Originally posted by James (or Jimmy Jim)
Man he's good, I just came across his work recently.

I want to have his children ... maybe not, my wife would kill me.:D

ROFL :evil:

James or Jimmy Jim
01-03-2004, 11:33 AM
I just found this image of his, a much looser treatment than most of the still lifes I've seen by him - nice spontaneous treatment.

Zarathustra
01-03-2004, 12:26 PM
Great paintings aren't they Jim. I don't think I've seen these ones, so thanks for sharing.

Chameleon - I'd demand free DVD's from Schmid, you'll probably make him wealthier man with that suggestion. ;) Or better still, tell him, he has to provide all his videos online, available only to Wetcanvas members. :D

Eugene Veszely
01-03-2004, 12:35 PM
Hey, now that is an idea !!!!

email will be sent shortly ;)

MikLNjLo
01-03-2004, 12:38 PM
I was hoping I had a digital version of his piece "Russian Doll" to post. Regarding his still life paintings, they are often sprinkled with a wide variety of materials. I have taken interest in them because it is somewhat atypical of him to hide the focal point in his compositions. I don't know that he is intending to hide it but you definitely end up looking all over many of these compositions. Some objects, like the wine glass in Russian Doll, are practically invisible until you notice them. Then you see this object, for example, is so masterfully painted capturing the translucency of the liquid and glass it could have carried the piece as the focal point by itself. There are details in antique canisters, dolls, books, and flowers that stand out yet in the center is this wine glass to be discovered. You know the glass is not the focal point when there is a doll and it is titled Russian Doll. As with his landscapes, he can pull clarity out of chaotic detail. Everything reads clearly and expresses their unique character accurately. With the flick of a brushstroke he expresses a rose petal or a leaf. Personally, I believe Schmid's strongest skill among many is his mastery with edges.

Here are a few of his still life paintings that illustrate some of the qualities in Russian Doll. If people are interested I will scan and upload it later in a subsequent post:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Jan-2004/24170-stilllife-Schmid.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Jan-2004/24170-henryclock-Schmid.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Jan-2004/24170-lemons-Schmid.jpg

Zarathustra
01-03-2004, 12:42 PM
I'd be very interested MikLNjLo, thanks.

James or Jimmy Jim
01-03-2004, 12:59 PM
Believe it or not, I am really more into loose, bright, impressionist painting as I find most realism (yes, I know that impressionism is realism, but you know what I mean) to be borderline boring. In fact, of the realists that I do like, I usually only like some of their work.

However, I find that Richard Schmid's work captures the energy and spontaneous brushwork that I like, and his talent for getting it all pinned down quickly is fantastic. I am so impressed with his work that I find it difficult to find the correct words to express my feelings. Yes, his edges are amazing. His wife's no slouch either.

James or Jimmy Jim
01-03-2004, 01:00 PM
His portrait sketches are great also.

MikLNjLo
01-03-2004, 02:28 PM
Richard Schmid talks about his influences and they are mostly Impressionists. I thought he was an Impressionist painter even though he achieves a level of realism in his work. I don't know enough about what defines each genre.

Originally posted by MikLNjLo
...Regarding his still life paintings, they are often sprinkled with a wide variety of materials. I have taken interest in them because it is somewhat atypical of him to hide the focal point in his compositions. I don't know that he is intending to hide it but you definitely end up looking all over many of these compositions. Some objects, like the wine glass in Russian Doll, are practically invisible until you notice them. Then you see this object, for example, is so masterfully painted capturing the translucency of the liquid and glass it could have carried the piece as the focal point by itself. There are details in antique canisters, dolls, books, and flowers that stand out yet in the center is this wine glass to be discovered. You know the glass is not the focal point when there is a doll and it is titled Russian Doll. As with his landscapes, he can pull clarity out of chaotic detail. Everything reads clearly and expresses their unique character accurately. With the flick of a brushstroke he expresses a rose petal or a leaf. Personally, I believe Schmid's strongest skill among many is his mastery with edges.

I copied this portion of my earlier post so it would be next to the image I was referencing.

Russian Doll by Richard Schmid

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Jan-2004/24170-Russian-Doll-rs3.jpg

I also included one of my favorite paintings. I love the painting and I love these chickens.

Yorkshire Chickens by Richard Schmid

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Jan-2004/24170-YorkshireChickens-rs3.jpg

scandia3815
01-03-2004, 03:04 PM
I would stop way short of thinking of Schmid as an Impressionist, for the same reason that Monet insisted that J.S. Sargent was not an Impressionist. Impressionism is not just a loose style, this is more of a by-product of what the impressionists were after: pure true-life color. Or at least what they felt was color as they really saw it, rather then color that has been diluted by mixing to achieve a value scale. Zorn is another example of a direct painter who although has a more 'painterly' style, was not an impressionist.

This is just my 'impression' of course (shoot me now for the bad pun), so anyone else feel free to jump in and clarify.

Aaron.

P.S. - Schmid is truly amazing, I love his work!

James or Jimmy Jim
01-03-2004, 03:22 PM
Ah, yes, capturing the fleeting moment ... the fugitive ...

Sargent did try his hand at impressionism later in his career, as far I know - mostly with watercolours. I don't have any images on this computer though.

Do you have any Zorn samples?

scandia3815
01-03-2004, 05:45 PM
Ah yes, thats right, I do remember seeing a few paintings by Sargent that were more along the 'impressionist' line of thought, and I believe I remember a work by Sargent where he actually painted Monet in the act of painting! THat would have been fun to watch.

When you look at the work of Zorn & Sargent together, you can see how their work must have influenced Schmid (he references both of them in his recent book a few times). A good collection of Zorn's work can be seen at the Art Renewal (ARC) website:

http://www.artrenewal.org/asp/database/art.asp?aid=1078


Aaron.

P.S. - I noticed the photograph of Zorn for his bio on ARC was contributed by none other then our own resident Zorn expert Matt V!

James or Jimmy Jim
01-03-2004, 06:29 PM
Thanks Aaron, I see what you mean.

By the way, Sargent never really won the respect of the impressionists. To many, his work was considered "superficial", even his attempts at impressionism.

MikLNjLo
01-03-2004, 10:11 PM
Schmid's earlier work was more impressionistic.

Would his current style be considered something like narrative realism?

A few samples of earlier paintings:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Jan-2004/24170-Aspen-Grove-rs2.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Jan-2004/24170-Oct-Morn-rs.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Jan-2004/24170-Schmid_34-fs.jpg

Eugene Veszely
01-04-2004, 04:19 AM
*longs to own a Schmid painting*

scandia3815
01-04-2004, 05:12 AM
MikLNjLO-- I've always kindof of thought of the current style of Schmid, and the styles of Zorn, Sargent, etc.. as a "poetic realism", which sounds pretty much the same as "narrative realism", so that sounds like a pretty good description to me.

In his book, Schmid wonders if photorealism is more effort then its worth, and preaches the value of selective focus in painting & composition. Which in a general sense I guess can be called a "painterly" approach, although I don't really think that word means anything as it is such a broad label.

Schmid's paintings remind me of what memories might look like if turned into paint straight out of one's head-- not crystal clear and precise, but both sharp and soft at the same time, the essence of the experience without the clutter-- a simple elegance, not one more paint stoke then was needed. Ok I'm done gushing over Schmid now... he is certainly one of my favorites!

Aaron.

Matt Sammekull
01-04-2004, 05:46 AM
In his own notes, Zorn called his style "sensualism". But he really wasn't mush for labeling pieces of art.

"Poetic Realism"... - I like that!

And Aaron - you've been in Skåne? I just visited your www. That's where I am living.

//matt

Zarathustra
01-04-2004, 06:12 AM
It's interesting to hear all these labels being used; it's a human, all to human trait in wanting to categorise and place everything into a suitable pigeon-hole, which of course has its uses, but perhaps sometimes it is better to leave things somewhat undefined.

Schmid captures a dream like quality that excites the imagination more than any piece of realism could ever hope to achieve. I imagine they don't take nearly as long to paint as a photorealistic piece either.

James or Jimmy Jim
01-04-2004, 06:38 AM
Originally posted by MikLNjLo
Schmid's earlier work was more impressionistic.

Would his current style be considered something like narrative realism?

A few samples of earlier paintings:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Jan-2004/24170-Aspen-Grove-rs2.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Jan-2004/24170-Oct-Morn-rs.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Jan-2004/24170-Schmid_34-fs.jpg
At first I thought your examples were Zorn's, then I realized thy were Schmid's. I like them.

OldFox
01-04-2004, 01:54 PM
I love his work as well. I have the Alla Prima books and it is worth every penny. I am looking for any of his videos and if anyone would like to sell a used one please let me know. I understand there were some that you can't buy from his site. Thanks Ken

scandia3815
01-04-2004, 03:25 PM
Originally posted by Matt Viinanen


And Aaron - you've been in Skåne? I just visited your www. That's where I am living.



I stayed with friends at their farm a bit south of Höör, wonderful countryside there in Skåne. Most of my time in Sverige though has been spent in Småland where my relatives live (Ljungby). Also very nice there as I love the forests. Your living in Helsingborg now? I've been there as well, but only to catch the ferry to Helsingor. It is quite a sight to see the mass amount of beer being brought back from Helsingor to Helsingborg on the ferry...it must be a big bargain over Swedish prices!

Aaron.

scandia3815
01-04-2004, 03:31 PM
Originally posted by Zarathustra
It's interesting to hear all these labels being used; it's a human, all to human trait in wanting to categorise and place everything into a suitable pigeon-hole, which of course has its uses, but perhaps sometimes it is better to leave things somewhat undefined.


This is true. For me, as I aspire to paint in the style of Zorn, Sargent, Schmid, etc... I need a label of some kind to help me organize my thoughts. It makes it easier when I am searching out artists that paint/ed along the same lines when I can think of a "poetic realism" rather then "artists that paint/ed in the style of Zorn, Sargent, Schmid, etc..." As you said, labels can have their uses sometimes. :)

Aaron.

Eugene Veszely
01-06-2004, 10:30 AM
I like the earlier pics that MikLNjLo posted over his latest works...dont know why...

MikLNjLo
01-07-2004, 07:40 AM
It's interesting to hear all these labels being used.......sometimes it is better to leave things somewhat undefined...
True, I just wondered how he was categorized. I am interested in many things about him including how he is considered in the art world.

Scandia- Is "poetic realism" an actual category or just something that describes your feelings? I pulled the term "narrative realism" from an exhibition calalog and wondered if this was the aurhor's feeling or a widely accepted view.

I know there are the identifiable "Impressionists" and their familiar interpretation of that genre but could impressionism in itself be an approach that might describe Schmid's work even though there are also elements of realism?

scandia3815
01-07-2004, 02:06 PM
I would think that "narrative", "poetic", "contemporary", etc.... are all basically saying the same thing. I think this is where Zarathustra's point rings true, in that you can loosly group artists into very broad catagories, but when you look to classify in more detail you don't really get anywhere as there are no real definitions for words such as "poetic", "narrative", "contemporary"-- they could mean just about anything, and probably do to different people. So "Poetic Realism" is just a really broad term I invented for myself, and it is more of what I aspire to achieve rather then how I might catagorize.

As for "impressionist"...to me that means True Color vs. Tonalism, and is an important distinction as these two objectives produce radically different methods. Used any other way, I think "impressionism" is simply another vague adjective like "poetic" or "narrative", and not really helpful.

Naturally this is my interpretation, and may differ from that of others-- thats the tricky thing with labels... they mean different things to different people :)

Aaron.

Biki
01-07-2004, 02:22 PM
Can someone post the link to his site to purchase books/videos.?

ta

biki

scandia3815
01-07-2004, 02:31 PM
Can someone post the link to his site to purchase books/videos.?

ta

biki

http://www.richardschmid.com/

I purchased his book from the website last year, easy transaction and the book arrived pretty quickly.

Aaron.

Zarathustra
01-16-2004, 09:41 AM
Book and video arrived yesterday. Haven't read the book yet, but have watched the video, and although a little on the pricey side, it is certainly very excellent and well produced, and Schmid knows how to talk to an audience, unlike a few art presenters I've come across in the past in other mediums. Definitely glad I made the purchase.

Eugene Veszely
01-16-2004, 10:22 AM
We expect to see rapid and great improvement now ;)

James or Jimmy Jim
01-16-2004, 10:27 AM
Book and video arrived yesterday. Haven't read the book yet, but have watched the video, and although a little on the pricey side, it is certainly very excellent and well produced, and Schmid knows how to talk to an audience, unlike a few art presenters I've come across in the past in other mediums. Definitely glad I made the purchase.


I've been waiting two weeks for mine (the book). They said it would take between two to four weeks, so, today could be the day!

I'm really looking forward to it. It better be good - at least it will have nice colour pictures. :D

Zarathustra
01-16-2004, 10:35 AM
Chameleon - give me a few years. ;)

James, mine took about two weeks for shipment to the UK. The postman left it on the doorstep, and there it sat for four hours for the whim of any opportunistic thief! Fortunately it is now in my care. I've just, in this past half hour, started reading the book. Flicking through, there is perhaps not quite as much WIP shots as I would have liked to have seen and for an entitled "everything I know about painting" book, I expected it to be twice as thick, but I'm quite sure the information will cover it all, and this book is a case of quality over quantity. I'm looking forward to reading it all.

Eugene Veszely
01-16-2004, 10:46 AM
I have seen the book briefly at a friends...if you can absorbe everything in it you will be doing well!!!....the colour section is interesting :)

James or Jimmy Jim
01-16-2004, 11:11 AM
Chameleon - give me a few years. ;)

James, mine took about two weeks for shipment to the UK. The postman left it on the doorstep, and there it sat for four hours for the whim of any opportunistic thief! Fortunately it is now in my care. I've just, in this past half hour, started reading the book. Flicking through, there is perhaps not quite as much WIP shots as I would have liked to have seen and for an entitled "everything I know about painting" book, I expected it to be twice as thick, but I'm quite sure the information will cover it all, and this book is a case of quality over quantity. I'm looking forward to reading it all.


Hi Gavin,

I was just reading your "Loomis" post, when this came in.

Schmid's work has really inspired me, although I usually prefer more impressionistic work over realism (for paintings, not drawings). I think it's his direct, no-nonsense portraits that did it for me - or maybe it was those flower still lifes.:D There's a quality about his work that doesn't have that overworked "photo" look to it, even though it is realistic. Love his values and edges.

Also, if you got yours in two weeks, I could get mine fairly soon - I'm not as far away.

Zarathustra
01-16-2004, 11:36 AM
I just took another skim through the book, and on a quick second viewing it really does seem to be quite comprehensive.

Jim, I don't know if you've come across Andrew Loomis before, but there's much that can be learnt from this recent master.
As for Schmid, he's described as many things: I liked Scandia's "poetic realism" description, and would probably add 'dreamlike' in there if I could. Although my opinion is as subjective as the next person's, I agree that it has something over and beyond overworked realism, simply because it lends so much more to the viewer's imagination.

James or Jimmy Jim
01-16-2004, 12:13 PM
Gavin,

I enjoyed looking at Loomis' PDFs and there is definitely some good stuff there, however, I'm not really crazy about his finished look. It's has a dated, almost cartoonish style to it. Lot of good info there though.

Regarding Schmid's work, I think I like what he leaves out of his paintings as much as he puts in. It's the economy of strokes. Question: most of the samples of his work that I've seen are fairly small; does he do any large pieces, say, 30" and up? Doesn't really matter, I suppose.

I recently bought a few other books: "Fill your paintings with light and colour", "The essentials in every powerful painting", "A proven strategy for creating great art", "Problem solving for oil painters", etc. and although they all offer something of value, they've still left me wanting more.

I prefer Schmid's work and I think his book will be better, based on the reviews.

James or Jimmy Jim
01-30-2004, 07:32 PM
Well, it's been yet another week and no "Alla prima" book yet.

Anyway, I did manage to "find" an older book "Richard Schmid Paints landscapes" using a province-wide library search, and got my local library to get it in. Pretty good info in it. Too many B&W images though - well, the book is almost 30 years old.

Interesting reading.

Zarathustra
01-31-2004, 04:26 AM
I'm surprised James, mine travelled 4000 miles in just under two weeks.

James or Jimmy Jim
02-03-2004, 04:29 PM
Well, it's here. It finally arrived and, needless to say, I'm VERY happy today.

I've already skimmed through the entire book and really like what I've read (and seen) so far. Some of his work looks very similar in style to another artist (who did another book that I have) whom I won't mention here. The depth and instruction here is much better though.

I also like the clean, easy-to-read design of the book.

Zarathustra
02-03-2004, 04:38 PM
Well, it's here. It finally arrived and, needless to say, I'm VERY happy today.

I've already skimmed through the entire book and really like what I've read (and seen) so far. Some of his work looks very similar in style to another artist (who did another book that I have) whom I won't mention here. The depth and instruction here is much better though.

I also like the clean, easy-to-read design of the book.

Got there eventually!
Go on, mention this other artist - I'm intrigued.

Matt Sammekull
02-03-2004, 04:47 PM
yeah... tell us!

/matt

James or Jimmy Jim
02-03-2004, 04:57 PM
Now, don't get me wrong here, I think Schmid is MUCH better than ___ (see sample - I didn't shoot the best examples from the book, but grabbed this off a web site). After looking again, the similarity is superficial and only applicable to some of his work - no comparison.

James or Jimmy Jim
02-04-2004, 07:28 PM
For anyone who has been wondering if Alla Prima is worth the money, my opinion is that it definitely is - it's amazing! It truly is a college course in a book. Topics are covered in detail that most books don't even touch on.

I just love his touch (if you know what I mean :D)!

James or Jimmy Jim
02-09-2004, 08:36 PM
I gave in and ordered "The captain's portrait". Sorry, I just couldn't help myself!:D

Zarathustra
02-10-2004, 03:47 AM
I don't think you'll be disappointed Jim. ;)
And I have seen the book prices on abe! It's a sham!!

James or Jimmy Jim
02-12-2004, 03:32 PM
My video has arrived!

I don't get this, the book took almost five weeks to get to me and the video took THREE DAYS. I'm not complaining.

Eugene Veszely
02-13-2004, 07:04 AM
Might have been a backlog of parcels :)

James or Jimmy Jim
02-13-2004, 09:41 AM
Wouldn't it be funny if Richard Schmid was lurking here and reading this thread. Even funnier if he assumed some strange name and posted comments here!

Zarathustra
02-13-2004, 09:50 AM
Wouldn't it be funny if Richard Schmid was lurking here and reading this thread. Even funnier if he assumed some strange name and posted comments here!

Chameleon - nobody knows your real name!! Your initials aren't R.S. by any chance?!

JamieWG
02-13-2004, 10:06 AM
My video has arrived!

I don't get this, the book took almost five weeks to get to me and the video took THREE DAYS. I'm not complaining.

Oh, Jim, how wonderful!!! I'm drooling. http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Feb-2004/13766-drool.gif Please, please give us a review.

Jamie

Eugene Veszely
02-13-2004, 10:47 AM
Chameleon - nobody knows your real name!! Your initials aren't R.S. by any chance?!

I wish!!!.....or I wish I was his son.

Well some people know my first name. ;)

Zarathustra
02-13-2004, 11:30 AM
Nice try Richard! ;)

James or Jimmy Jim
02-13-2004, 11:37 AM
Nice try Richard! ;)


Ha! Has anyone seen Chameleon's work? This is funny.

Zarathustra
02-13-2004, 11:42 AM
He's very elusive isn't he... never seems to post his work in this forum!
I mean the clue's in the alias - "chameleon" - a creature that tries to hide its identity!

James or Jimmy Jim
02-13-2004, 11:51 AM
I know, I actually thought about that a few days ago.

He commented on the money I spent on my paints; said that he recommend the DVD route; said that the colour section of the book was interesting, but he didn't own a copy; said that it would be great to meet RS; gets Beckers paints from Matt ... hmmm.

Probably just a kid in New Zealand. :D

James or Jimmy Jim
02-13-2004, 11:53 AM
Oh, Jim, how wonderful!!! I'm drooling. http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Feb-2004/13766-drool.gif Please, please give us a review.

Jamie


Well, I'm sure my feelings and comments won't be particularly unique - and I only watched it twice last night :D. My wife actually sat through it with me as she was curious about my latest art obsession (she's my true obsession and she knows it).

Anyway, where was I? Oh yes, Schmid. He looked older than I thought and he was very charismatic, personable and humble. I enjoyed seeing how he worked, his palette, brushes, etc., but only because I like his work so much, otherwise I wouldn't care. The fact that he worked from life (with a live audience studying his every move) was impressive. No tracing or tricks, just intense concentration and accurate drawing (with colour, as he puts it).

What I thought was a little funny was the way he painted some of the background off the canvas and onto the board, I think he started a little too high and needed more space above. But that's the reality of a live performance and a little pressure (didn't really matter, as it was a demonstration). What I also liked was how he first did a monochromatic version (first lesson) then kept on painting with more colour (second lesson) until it was finished.

After painting he did a few Q&As and got into a bit of philosophy.

I highly recommend the video if you like his work. Now I have to get his other videos too. :D

Eugene Veszely
02-14-2004, 10:11 AM
I know, I actually thought about that a few days ago.

He commented on the money I spent on my paints; said that he recommend the DVD route; said that the colour section of the book was interesting, but he didn't own a copy; said that it would be great to meet RS; gets Beckers paints from Matt ... hmmm.

Probably just a kid in New Zealand. :D

You guys are too funny.....I'm in OZ actually :)

Zarathustra
02-14-2004, 12:19 PM
Hey "chameleon" (?!), perhaps you are in Oz at present, but a few years ago you were in Vermont, painting in front of a live audience... I have your video and it's great. No need to stay hidden in the closet dude. ;)

James or Jimmy Jim
02-14-2004, 08:21 PM
You guys are too funny.....I'm in OZ actually :)


Just testin' you Cham.:D

You are a little suspicious though, you must admit.

_00_
02-15-2004, 03:39 AM
Hi Everybody,

I have both of Richard Schmid's videos also. Regarding the monochromatic start of the portrait, he said that was unusual and something he did because he was limited in time and in front of an audience. If he filmed the video the following day he might have selected any number of other approaches including monochromatic. I believe he is a true master and it is cool that this is caught on tape. Film works with his personality. I like the guy immensely from the personality that is displayed in these videos and in his writing. Chammelion said the color sections of the book were interesting. There are not any B&W images unlike his earlier books. I wonder what was meant. Maybe text as opposed to images? I wish the third video would come out. At this rate he will be 90 years old before the 4 seasons are released. I noticed in the most recent photo I saw that he has finally traded in the heavy surveyor's tripod and standard cane (maul stick) for alluminum types. They almost seem like they were custom made and patterned after his originals except made lighter and with some degree of compactibility. Some day I hope to see some of his work in person.

Carl

Eugene Veszely
02-15-2004, 03:57 AM
Just testin' you Cham.:D

You are a little suspicious though, you must admit.

Me suspicious...wellI never....:)