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View Full Version : (Digital Pastel) Young woman powdering herself,Morisot copy


fugitive
12-20-2003, 03:48 AM
Taking another run at the Impressionists, this one Morisot, but I'm working on a Degas also. This is digital , with a Pastel bent. Of course the challenges are different, but it's still done with the same feeling.


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Dec-2003/9466-Young_woman_powdering_herself,Morisot_copy_wc.jpg

jackiesimmonds
12-20-2003, 04:04 AM
Sorry - I am curious - WHY do it as a digital? Why not use actual pastels? Or are you working towards that?

fugitive
12-20-2003, 04:06 AM
Because, that's what I do.

Dyin
12-20-2003, 10:42 AM
Hey, not really into Impressionistic stuff but like how the dress looks all glittery, like a thousand little pastel strokes, all clean and seperate.

fugitive
12-20-2003, 01:39 PM
Thanks Sue, do you understand why I did it in digi?

BruceF
12-20-2003, 01:56 PM
I really like it. :clap:

I wouldn't have known it was digital if you hadn't mentioned it. Of course, at these resolutions it's hard to tell.

I am curious as to how you've accojmplished this look. Are you painting with something like a Wacom tablet? Are you blocking in areas and then applying a pastel filter (if that is the correct term) to the painting?

As for why, I can think of a few reasons to paint digitally. A wide color palette and no dust . :D

Eisenhower
12-20-2003, 02:41 PM
Fugitive,

I really like the picture, but I'm with Jackie. Why digital? Does this mean you don't use real pastels but instead electronic pastels? I don't understand the idea behind digital art I guess. I had no idea using pastels without using pastels was possible.

What do you do with your final peice, a print and then frame it? Can you explain your process? It seems if this is your medium there are definate reasons as to why you chose digital over actually working with pastels. If I am way off, let me know as I have no knowledge of digital art.

Thanks and I love her arm in the picture. It stands out to me.

Kelly

fugitive
12-20-2003, 03:19 PM
Originally posted by Eisenhower
Fugitive,

I really like the picture, but I'm with Jackie. Why digital? Does this mean you don't use real pastels but instead electronic pastels? I don't understand the idea behind digital art I guess. I had no idea using pastels without using pastels was possible.

What do you do with your final peice, a print and then frame it? Can you explain your process? It seems if this is your medium there are definate reasons as to why you chose digital over actually working with pastels. If I am way off, let me know as I have no knowledge of digital art.

Thanks and I love her arm in the picture. It stands out to me.

Kelly
You want me to send the arm along?
Why digi. When I started learning PC's I didn't know it would go here, I just wanted to learn. I have been an artist since five, and if it made images, it was ok with me. I had given up messy art while trying to live and work, but this was different, didn't take as big a commitment in space and materials, then, I got better, and better.
The process; I posted a little about that in a digi painting called Marie.

fugitive
12-20-2003, 03:22 PM
Eisenhower, saw the Orange County. I spent 25 yrs there, nice but not nice, everything at once.

marilyn h
12-20-2003, 04:12 PM
I like your pastel digi. It looks so convincing and very good copy. Your work is so amazing.

fugitive
12-20-2003, 05:23 PM
Originally posted by BruceF
I really like it. :clap:

I wouldn't have known it was digital if you hadn't mentioned it. Of course, at these resolutions it's hard to tell.

I am curious as to how you've accojmplished this look. Are you painting with something like a Wacom tablet? Are you blocking in areas and then applying a pastel filter (if that is the correct term) to the painting?

As for why, I can think of a few reasons to paint digitally. A wide color palette and no dust . :D I think it's a requirement now to say it's Digital. That's cause I would fool the folks sometimes. Wacom yes. Filters, none. layers and advanced techniques. And last but not least, I can paint. I would post full size if they'd allow it.

fugitive
12-20-2003, 05:25 PM
I like you marilyn, you understand. It's just art, if it looks good and you like it, that's all that really matters.

sundiver
12-20-2003, 05:43 PM
Originally posted by fugitive
I think it's a requirement now to say it's Digital.

Same with oil pastels (which I use a lot). It makes sense- gives people a more accurate reference point when viewing the painting.
I'm getting a Wacom for Christmas and am very excited, especially when I look at this painting. It's lovely BTW.
For me, working digitally couldn't substitute for smearing those sticks around myself, but it'll be another medium for me and I look forward to learning it.
How do you get that scumbled effect digitally?

Dark_Shades
12-20-2003, 06:06 PM
I know your name so know what you do :) ... you look like you have used this to great affect.... but a couple of things bother me some what, one is the arm nearest, looks incredibly long .... and also smooth where the rest of the work is more broken.... as I dont know the actual work this maybe how it looks in real..... are you still working on this?..... Ive just realised there is no sleeve Ha!

Dyin
12-20-2003, 06:56 PM
Yep! :evil: cuz that's what you do!!!

oooh, sundiver...will be fun seeing what you can do with your new wacom! It's cool how you can get the different medium effects...I don't think I have the patience or the back to sit at the puter long enough to learn it this well!

Mo.
12-20-2003, 07:19 PM
I think it's a requirement now to say it's Digital. That's cause I would fool the folks sometimes. Wacom yes. Filters, none. layers and advanced techniques. And last but not least, I can paint. I would post full size if they'd allow it.

The requirement is to put digital in the title, which you have failed to do.

Nice work BTW.!

Mo.:)

fugitive
12-20-2003, 09:14 PM
Originally posted by Mo.


The requirement is to put digital in the title, which you have failed to do.

Nice work BTW.!

Mo.:) How bout moving it to the end of my header.

fugitive
12-20-2003, 11:24 PM
Originally posted by sundiver


Same with oil pastels (which I use a lot). It makes sense- gives people a more accurate reference point when viewing the painting.
I'm getting a Wacom for Christmas and am very excited, especially when I look at this painting. It's lovely BTW.
For me, working digitally couldn't substitute for smearing those sticks around myself, but it'll be another medium for me and I look forward to learning it.
How do you get that scumbled effect digitally? \Scum"ble\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Scumbled}; p. pr. & vb.
n. {Scumbling}.] [Freq. of scum. [root] 158.] (Fine Arts)
To cover lighty, as a painting, or a drawing, with a thin
wash of opaque color, or with color-crayon dust rubbed on
with the stump, or to make any similar additions to the work,
so as to produce a softened effect.

I use layers, but not like in oil painting. They are like separate pictures on different layers, that I control. That's how the little spots are done, they have a different color move applied to them, which changes the looks. This is a more advanced technique, as far as my work is concerned, These tecniques are my own. There are, however, no filters or special effects used. I leave that for the photo manipulators..

jackiesimmonds
12-21-2003, 04:59 AM
Originally posted by fugitive
Because, that's what I do.

I think it is a pity that you could not be bothered to explain it a little more fully.
For example, if someone asked me why I chose to use pastels, instead of oils, or watercolours, for my work, this would be my reply:

1. I like the immediacy of pastels; there is no need to wait for anything to dry, I can crack on without hesitation.

2. I really like the feel of the pastel, the way my hand makes very direct contact with the paper, as opposed to the use of a brush.

3. I like the ease with which I can correct a passage in a pastel painting.

4. I like the fact that pastel is an opaque medium, and I can work over previous layers, allowing some of the previous layers to sparkle through if I want them to.


I realise that you are entitled to answer my question any way you want, but I was genuinely curious, and I don't think that the above is much of an answer. All strength to you, if this is "what you do", I am not denying the validity of what you do as a form of creation ...takes all sorts, in my opinion, I remember being knocked out by what Hockney did with slices of photos .....I just wondered WHY you prefer using a computer, to using the original methods of producing a pastel painting. I am not particularly interested in HOW, only WHY. I am sure there are lots of reasons.

J

fugitive
12-21-2003, 05:08 AM
Look, I thot perhaps there was some ulterior motive in your quest. If I was wrong, sorry. We did have to fight our way into this forum.
When I got into the puter, I didn't plan on it getting anywhere, I was just playing. I had given up pastels, and watercolors, and acrylics many years before, and working tends to remove the artistic side. I even made myself earn the Wacom tablet, not getting it, until I thot I was good enough to deserve it.
There's no going back now, as I'm on a mission to get digital art some respect.

scottb
12-21-2003, 11:51 AM
Originally posted by fugitive
Look, I thot perhaps there was some ulterior motive in your quest. If I was wrong, sorry. We did have to fight our way into this forum.
When I got into the puter, I didn't plan on it getting anywhere, I was just playing. I had given up pastels, and watercolors, and acrylics many years before, and working tends to remove the artistic side. I even made myself earn the Wacom tablet, not getting it, until I thot I was good enough to deserve it.


Please see our new (official) policy on the posting of digital works of art:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=154586

We did have to fight our way into this forum.
..... There's no going back now, as I'm on a mission to get digital art some respect.

If you'd like to discuss this new policy, I invite you to contact me via email.

Cheers.
Scott