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caro
07-27-2001, 05:01 PM
I painted this yesterday afternoon. I liked it at first when I finshed painting but now when I look at it something just doesn't seem right... please critique!!!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Jul-2001/2_baeme.jpg

LarrySeiler
07-28-2001, 10:34 AM
Garsh Caro, I saw all these viewer hits with no response and thought....goodness, there must be something that can be said, "let's have a look at this person's work!"

What I did below is about a 20 minute software alteration and represents about 1/3rd the time I spend on a graphic visual when I critique an artist's work on my artsmentor site. Thus, it is crude...but enough to give some ideas to what I'll share.

I'll first off invite you to check out my "artsmentor.org" site and go to my demo/instructionals link page where about ten of my Wetcanvas "how-to's" are listed, and you can see more indepth instruction and demonstration on my painting of trees.



Do not judge trees by their leaves, but by the shape and mass of its whole. Squint your eyes to eliminate seeing distracting detail and look for the shape. <b>THEN</b> look for where the sky pokes thru the mass, which defines the caracature of the tree's species. Learn to paint those spaces rather than leaves. Then, use limited brush work and color to suggest where the light is hitting. Now...I used airbrush applications on my software, but on my lessons you'll see how the brush works much better and says leaves...without painting a gazillion leaves.

Next...a painting is to have rythym, that is...color ought to repeat. You show greens in the foreground shadows that don't really appear anywhere else in the picture. In a painting, harmony and unity are pulled together by successfully repeating color, or achieving good color "rythym." So, colors of the sky you bounce around into the ground, colors of the ground you find places to repeat (like clouds) in the sky. Colors off tree bark, the foilage, etc; a construction process. Not easy...but a thing to strive for as without it makes it look like you piece together several different paintings into one. The parts have to be related.
That's what color notes spread around does, which we refer to as rythym.

Another point is that you have put a great deal of warm color and lighter value on one side of the tree suggesting there is the presence of a sun that would have influence. Your sky does not say this sun has such a presence, so I had to change that. Your shadows did not say that either because no tree trunks were coated and bathed with sun, and no shadows cast. So, continuity in theme of what is happening must be created. If there is a sun...then all is affected by it. If there are no affects, then no sun would cast a light to suggest all these leaves are lit up either. Understand?

Start thinking of cool colors in shadows, warm colors in light, and using cool color to make distant hills look distant. Note how the effect of sun is implicated now in the distant hills.

Also....I altered the shape of the hill on the left to go off the picture plane so that the eye moves a bit easier.

Then...since we have a sun, I decided to allow its presence be felt in the sky as well. I blasted out the blue as you have it, which gives this sense of intensity. The color of the yellows also conveniently works to establish this color "rythym" I spoke of, since we have yellow elsewhere and analogous colors as such throughout the picture.

Hope this gives you somethings to consider and look over! Take care. -Larry


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Jul-2001/caro_landscape.jpg

Leaflin
07-28-2001, 03:04 PM
Hi Caro :)
I love the colours in the lower half of your sky.
When I blocked out some of the blue I found it more pleasing, and it seemed to inhance the field in the middle ground.

I enjoy all the info in your posts Larry.

animal
07-28-2001, 11:01 PM
Originally posted by leaflin
Hi Caro :)
I love the colours in the lower half of your sky.
When I blocked out some of the blue I found it more pleasing, and it seemed to inhance the field in the middle ground.

I enjoy all the info in your posts Larry.

I agree with Leaflin and Larry. :angel: :angel:

caro
07-28-2001, 11:41 PM
Larry,
thank you so much for the lesson - I'll remember it! After all I'm still a beginner in painting and appreciate all information and advice I can get. I'm reworking the painting right now and will post an update later.

Leaflin and Animal, thank you both for looking and taking the time to comment :)