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kieran
09-28-2000, 07:47 AM
Hi,
I have completed 2 watercolour landscapes since Monday (my first 2 for a couple of years). I am reasonably happy with the paintings apart from the water in them. It doesn't look realistic at all. I don't have access to a scanner so I can't post the paintings for discussion, but I was wondering if there was a lesson anywhere online that might help me?
Thanks in advance,
Kieran

Dennis
09-28-2000, 11:54 AM
Check out the quiet lake lesson at: http://www.wetcanvas.com/ArtSchool/Watercolors/QuietLake/

artwoman1
09-28-2000, 01:40 PM
Can you be more specific about what disatisfies you about your paintings. I looked at the suggestion from the previous post and I am not sure how that meets or does not meet your needs. For instance if you wanted to depict agitation in the water the lesson offered previously might not be what you need. What about color or light conditions? Is the problem spatial? Give me something to address?


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Davida

kieran
10-02-2000, 06:16 AM
Hi,
Yes. You are right. I am trying to depict moving water, as in rivers and seas. The lesson 'Quiet Lake' is excellent, but not quite what I am looking for.
My problem is capturing the 'movement' of water. Any suggestions would be welcome.
Thanks
Kieran

oleCC
10-02-2000, 07:40 AM
Hi... your guestion about water really is difficult to answer without seeing your paintings first..but... the following techniques may help...hope so http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif
1) use masking fluid to save your whites for ripples and sparkles in the water. This works for white caps as well. The hard edges can be softened later with a damp brush.Be sure your paper is totally dry before removing the masking fluid.

2) on white paper, before putting any serious color in the water, use the flat of your brush and "scrape" across with light color. It will define some "sparkles and ripples"..but this technique takes practice.
You can add more colors where you want them afer this drys. Your brush can't be too wet and your paper must be dry. This also works after you already have some color in your water - if using a darker value.
Only two of many techniques you can try.
There are many books available that deal with this topic...but maybe the above can help some eh? http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif Carol

[This message has been edited by oleCC (edited October 02, 2000).]

ameliajordan
10-03-2000, 11:10 AM
Another tip would be to use a candle or parrafin to save some sparkle. Of course Homer and Sargant used guoche.

artwoman1
10-15-2000, 10:49 PM
Originally posted by kieran:
Hi,
Yes. You are right. I am trying to depict moving water, as in rivers and seas. The lesson 'Quiet Lake' is excellent, but not quite what I am looking for.
My problem is capturing the 'movement' of water. Any suggestions would be welcome.
Thanks
Kieran
Here are some ways to achieve movement. Use small squiggly(technical term) brush strokes to indicate wave action as in an open body of water or lake. How squiggly is a matter of how agitated you want the water to appear. The squiggles are closer together at the horizon and become gradually further apart towards the foreground. The principle of perspective is the same as for things like railroad ties. They get narrower and closer together as they go back towards the horizon. You can depict white caps of agitated water by laying down a base wash and allowing skips to form a you stroke the brush quickly over the paper. Then the squiggly strokes can be applied over the base wash after it has dried. Also vary the colors of the squiggly strokes all the while increasing the purity and saturation of the colors as they move to the foreground. The area at the horizon line will appear darker because of the concentration of the squiggly strokes but you can push the space further by darkening that area more. You can also push the space by placing an intense color in the far background and repeating it at the same intensity in the close foreground. If you lose too many of the whites you can take some sand paper an gently scrape some the paint off. you can also use an exacto knife to pick some white out. Both these methods of regaining whites should be done selectively and when the paper is completely dry. The paper once it is sanded will not take paint well again as all the sizing will have been removed and those spots will soak up paint like a blotter. Have fun!

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Davida

[This message has been edited by artwoman1 (edited October 15, 2000).]