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View Full Version : Does anyone know of classes/workshops in my area?


Tap
12-03-2003, 03:43 PM
I'm looking to take some classes or attend some workshops in my general area. I'm living in the corner of SW Montana, in a little bitty place called Dillon. That puts me about 140 miles north of Idaho Falls, 120 miles southwest of Bozeman, 170 miles south of Missoula.

I'm willing to do some traveling, hopefully the car will agree. But I'd even take a weekly trip over the weekend if I could find a teacher.

I need the added push of attending classes to get me moving and to help with my neglected education on painting with pastels.

Tap ;~D

Gaka
12-03-2003, 08:46 PM
Hi Tap

It must be difficult wanting to learn...but not having access to art classes, teachers or demonstrations etc.....I have never had an art class nor any type of demonstrations in the 40 some years that I have been painting....The added advantage that you have over me is that you have access to such a wealth of information and large group artist on Wet Canvas who paint in all styles and mediums and they will be more than willing to help you sholud you ask.

You say that you need a push....I am pushing, but you may have to push yourself first and start reading all the information that on Wet Canvas that can, print it out, put into practice the information that you get, practice painting and don't hesitate to ask questions. I think that you will find that once you start you will find it more and more interesting and your enthusiasm will grow along with your paintings.

Good luck and enjoy yourself :)

Gaka

Doogun
12-03-2003, 10:55 PM
Tap,
If you really want to learn, follow along in any of Gaka's demonstrations.
Larry

Tap
12-04-2003, 02:13 AM
Originally posted by Gaka
Hi Tap

It must be difficult wanting to learn...but not having access to art classes, teachers or demonstrations etc.....I have never had an art class nor any type of demonstrations in the 40 some years that I have been painting....The added advantage that you have over me is that you have access to such a wealth of information and large group artist on Wet Canvas who paint in all styles and mediums and they will be more than willing to help you sholud you ask.

You say that you need a push....I am pushing, but you may have to push yourself first and start reading all the information that on Wet Canvas that can, print it out, put into practice the information that you get, practice painting and don't hesitate to ask questions. I think that you will find that once you start you will find it more and more interesting and your enthusiasm will grow along with your paintings.

Good luck and enjoy yourself :)

Gaka

Thank you, Gaka. That is such great advice. And so true. I look at the paintings here and they are all inspiration. I sat tonight and did a Pastel Abstract. I want to do more. I'll take your push and I'll try to follow your advice.

The funny thing is that I'm pretty good with words til it comes to figuring out something new... I'm more of a hands on, watch it being accomplished and I know how to do it, no fears at all...

But I'll give it a go, and keep you posted.

Tap ;~D

jackiesimmonds
12-04-2003, 03:50 AM
I am not sure how it works in the US, but over here in the UK, the way to find out whether there are any classes available to attend, is either to go to the local library and ask there - they often have lists of what goes on in the way of "adult education" classes in the area, and sometimes even have notes of private tutors; the other option is to get some copies of art instruction magazines, and we usually find workshops advertised in them.

More ideas:

There are LOADS of organisations in the USA offering painting holidays - you could look up painting holidays on the internet. YOu could even look up "pastel painting holidays". You may have to travel to a different location, but if it was for a few days, that might work for you. Depends on your pocket.

You could find out if there is a pastel society of any kind, in your area. There are lists of pastel societies in the US - you are lucky to have loads while we only have a couple here in the UK. Contact your nearest Pastel Society, and ask about workshops and teaching. If you don't have a nearby society, then contact the PSA - Pastel Society of America, and ask them about the nearest available pastel workshops to where you live. I am not sure whether this will be useful or not - not good at US locations - but have a look:
http://www.pastelinternational.com/showcase/psnr/


Finally - go visit your nearest art materials shop. They may well have details of professional artists in your area, who offer classes.AND they should have apropriate art magazines for you to buy.

If all else fails..............resort to learning from books, and from the threads here at WC!. There is SO much information available to you, to get you started. I have written two books, and made six videos all about painting with pastels, for instance - one of my books, with its accompanying video, is ideal for a complete beginner who wants his or her hand held right from the off. You have exercises to follow, to get you going. Go to the library, there will be other books there too.

Incidetnally - it isn't necessary to attend classes (tho it IS great fun, and you will learn a lot, from the tutor, and from the other students, so I would encourage you to go if you can). No-one taught me how to work with pastels, I found out for myself. I own loads of books, I looked at the works of the old masters (Degas, Toulouse Lautrec, Berthe Morisot) and modern masters, and practiced, practiced, practiced. I still do!!

Go for it. Have fun.

J

Striver
12-04-2003, 05:03 AM
Hi
If you have a lending library nearby, borrow some books, might even have one by Jackie. Then just go for it! Look at the Artist books in your news agent or booksellers, often one you can buy with lessons in.
No better place than wc, just feel your way around and have a go. Be your own tutor.
Regards
Les

jackiesimmonds
12-04-2003, 05:09 AM
I read in another post that you have started with an abstract in pastel........great stuff!!! That is JUST the way to go about it.

Have fun
Jackie

marilyn h
12-04-2003, 09:24 AM
Have you called the Arts Council in Idaho Falls, Dillion, etc?

There is an Art Guild in Idaho Falls. A very active Art Guild. Also Ricks College in Rexburg has a director that is great in watercolor he might be able to tell you of Pastel teachers. His name is Richard Bird. He is great for information. He is/was a professor of Ricks College. I don't know if he is retired.

There is also an Art Museum/new on the Snake River that has information. I don't have the information or phone numbers of these places but I am sure if you look in IF's Webpage of Chamber of Commerce you should find all this information.

I believe Pampe lives in your area!

Deborah Secor
12-04-2003, 04:24 PM
There's a very talented artist in Bozeman named Aaron Schuerr who teaches pastel classes in his studio. PM me and I'll put you in touch with him, if you want to.

He does landscapes that are to die for and has a sterling art education, is raising kids and working as a youth pastor at a church--and he'd be a good guy to get to know, I think. His work is stunningly realistic, but not over detailed. He won best of show at the Lone Star Pastel Society this year (Maggie Price gave him that prize...)

Hope the distance isn't too great--but here in NM 120 miles isn't too far! Wasn't it you who said something in another thread about 2 1/2 hours to the mall? I wanta move there! LOL (Don't go to the mall much myself. I'm a mail order mama...)

Deborah

Tap
12-04-2003, 08:07 PM
Thank you Jackie, Les, Marilyn & Dee. All great points and suggestions.

I have this fear of wasting my supplies like so many do. I sort of feel like I'm living in isolation with no way to go see and touch and check out before I buy.... but I chose this place for it's visual beauty and inspiration... I'm learning to shop from catalogs big time. LOL

I was afraid of cutting or tearing the Ersta, didn't know if that could ruin it, but also knew there had to be a way to get it to a smaller size. I'm also somewhat of a traditionalist, if an artist is "supposed" to tear water color and not cut it, I want to do what I'm "supposed" to do. That can be kind of boring and limiting, I know, but I believe there was a reason for all that, sooo...

I'm trying to devote at least an hour to painting every day, and working on projects. I figure I need some planning lessons too because I have this beautiful painting of a friend riding a bull... well okay, I'll be honest and admit I have a painting of the bull with a pair of legs and the friend up to his waist because I didn't plan well enough to get the rest of him on the paper.

Dee, I could pretty much happily never go to the mall, I just want an art supply store. The closest thing we have is Ben Franklin and Michael's in Bozeman and Missoula, 1 1/2 and 2 1/2 hours away respectively. When I go to NY for Christmas I'll be spending HOURS in the art supply places, just staring at the pastels (if I can get access to a car). LOL

Here in Montana, 120 miles is nothing. They do 300 miles each way in a day, stay over for 600 miles away. Basketball season is starting and it's nothing for the teams to travel across state to play each other. As it was explained to me, think of Montana as a sheet of 4x8 plywood... 400 miles high by 800 miles wide. We have everything from grasslands and deserts to mountains and forests.

Thank you for the advice. I'm going to get busy. Here's the abstract. It's not quite what I was thinking of but it is what I was feeling.

:cat:

Tap ;~D

prestonsega
12-05-2003, 02:51 AM
I understand how you feel. I live in a VERy rural towm.. The fact that I can make green from blue and yellew was the criteria that made the the local artist in resident. I actually asked me if I could reproduse an offset litho sold in the dollar store, brcause the "client " likd it!!!!!....A kick to an artists ego and pride , I got to get over that ,,,,at least i refered him to someone who "may have no integrity,,,,I guess that is the differenc in an aritst and and the art techicin.

pampe
12-05-2003, 06:09 PM
Did you check with the college?

here, the community college has good art classes..and you have a REAL college

Tap
12-05-2003, 10:01 PM
Originally posted by pampe
Did you check with the college?

here, the community college has good art classes..and you have a REAL college

I've checked what they were offering last semester and didn't see anything. I hear they have a great art department, I just haven't seen much to sell me on going there and signing up for a course. Silly girl that I am, I got used to being able to see samples of the paintings offered for classes when I was doing decorative arts and also had the bad experience of signing up for an art class at State University of NY at Albany only to have the teacher grab my brush and say "No no no!!! LIKE THIS!!!" That made the picture HERS, not mine... I have taken classes at other places where the teacher had a pad of paper and drew on his own paper to show me how to fix MINE. Am I being too fussy here? I'll have to see when I can get to the campus. It is only 2 blocks from work. Tho I am hoping for the job I applied for in Bozeman today. Crossing fingers, toes, ankles & eyes. LOL

Tap ;~D

Deborah Secor
12-06-2003, 12:38 PM
My heart thumped when you mentioned a teacher working on your painting. You see, I do that all the time. It seems that I must show my students how to do it on their paintings--not on another sheet of paper. I guess most of the time it's because they have a particular set of colors, layered in a particular way, that I can't reproduce. I always try not to do it all, or do it completely, and I try to use their pastels (not my own, which may be different), and respect their work, but I do paint on their student paintings. I always, always make sure they understand that I will do that and ask them to tell me if they don't want me to touch it---but when they come to a class to paint, it's student work and painting on their piece is part of how I teach. I may be wrong, but I've taught for 14 years now and that's how it works best for me...

So, you might want to open up to that idea. I remember one time when Albert Handell walked over to a painting of mine and picked up a stick of charcoal and began to lightly feather over the water, and suddenly it looked like a glistening, soft reflection. I was blown away! No other way I could have learned that--to see it on my own painting showed me not just that it could happen but HOW to do it, right there in my own dust. Often he would add a touch of light, a soaring speck of color that brought it alive, and I was just thrilled to understand. However, he wouldn't touch one of my paintings today... I was his student then, not now.

Ok, I've rattled on enough now! LOL Just hit a nerve, I guess...

Deborah

Tap
12-06-2003, 03:09 PM
Originally posted by dee_artist
My heart thumped when you mentioned a teacher working on your painting. You see, I do that all the time. It seems that I must show my students how to do it on their paintings--not on another sheet of paper. I guess most of the time it's because they have a particular set of colors, layered in a particular way, that I can't reproduce. I always try not to do it all, or do it completely, and I try to use their pastels (not my own, which may be different), and respect their work, but I do paint on their student paintings. I always, always make sure they understand that I will do that and ask them to tell me if they don't want me to touch it---but when they come to a class to paint, it's student work and painting on their piece is part of how I teach. I may be wrong, but I've taught for 14 years now and that's how it works best for me...

So, you might want to open up to that idea. I remember one time when Albert Handell walked over to a painting of mine and picked up a stick of charcoal and began to lightly feather over the water, and suddenly it looked like a glistening, soft reflection. I was blown away! No other way I could have learned that--to see it on my own painting showed me not just that it could happen but HOW to do it, right there in my own dust. Often he would add a touch of light, a soaring speck of color that brought it alive, and I was just thrilled to understand. However, he wouldn't touch one of my paintings today... I was his student then, not now.

Ok, I've rattled on enough now! LOL Just hit a nerve, I guess...

Deborah

Good points, Deborah, very good. I was LOTS younger then and had teachers who came over and did make some changes, but this gal pretty much did over the whole picture. And having matured some I've handed over my piece, my brush & pallete and had a teacher demonstrate strokes on my work. I think it was the way in which it was done... a harsh tone, grabbing the brush, not saying, "may I." before taking the brush and showing... I think the teachers that do the demo your way, gently, still leave a student with that sense of wonder and a feeling that they, too, can do the same thing the teacher just demo'd without abruptly grabbing the brush and changing things... Does that make sense?

When I read your reply I thought I shouldn't have posted, but it was the truth, I really hated the feeling I got in that class, had even dropped it.

Then I got a new job and was telling someone about that teacher and she told me of her teacher. He was the one who moved me to learning pastels and would indeed demo on a picture, but it was in a gentle instructional way. BTW, I'm no shrinking violet too fragile for the harsh words, but I also try to be aware of the feelings that everyone has. When Russ was teaching you listened, you saw and you then did without fear of a loud scolding in front of the class. I was 20 at the time and just starting pastels...

Tap ;~D