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champagneharley
11-30-2003, 09:41 AM
I don't feel validated as an artist unless my work is purchased. This stops me from creating if I have too many paintings around me.
Don't tell me not to feel this way, it was drummed in to me from childhood from people who didn't understand. I always wanted to make my living as an artist, anyway. When I would show my art to my Mother her comment was ... very nice, have you sold it?
Anyway, that's not my question. With the internet comes all kinds of ways that an artist can get their art out in the 'market'. Although mine is too diverse for galleries, usually.
Thing is, instead of creating art, I frantically search for ways to market my art, and spend money on so many ways that I think might. Particularly spending hours on the internet, when I could be painting.
Is anyone else like this?
I keep hoping someone will just discover me, and want me to do nothing but create art for that one source for the rest of my life, so I don't keep searching.
Even when I do get some work to do, I am still spending time searching. If I work a full time job, I can't rest on weekends, as I'm trying to find ways to get my art out there.
Thanx.
Regards,
Jillian

Doogun
11-30-2003, 07:40 PM
Jillian,
You might want to consider going a non conventional route in showing some of your art. By this I mean things like self promoted shows, hanging pieces in restarants, coffee shops, attorneys offices, banks, etc. ( only choose top of the line restarants and coffee shops- not dumps)
I visited your website and found that you are a very talented artist. Find out who the art lovers/collectors are in your area and send them a special invitation to your own self promoted art show.
Well i've messed with your mind enough, so i'll wish you the best of luck.
Larry

champagneharley
11-30-2003, 07:57 PM
Originally posted by Doogun
Jillian,
You might want to consider going a non conventional route in showing some of your art. By this I mean things like self promoted shows, hanging pieces in restarants, coffee shops, attorneys offices, banks, etc. ( only choose top of the line restarants and coffee shops- not dumps)
I visited your website and found that you are a very talented artist. Find out who the art lovers/collectors are in your area and send them a special invitation to your own self promoted art show.
Well i've messed with your mind enough, so i'll wish you the best of luck.
Larry
Larry, I really appreciate your comments.
It's been just a while ago (in last few hours) that I was looking at some info on having your own displays/shows and alternate display places!
I guess someone is trying to give me a message! :)
Thanks so much for visiting and commenting. Your re-inforcement means a lot to me.
Regards,
Jillian

timelady
12-01-2003, 08:30 AM
Jillian,
Just thought this might make you feel better about all those paintings... the more successful you are the more you need! In fact, you need more to be successful too. It's like always moving in a circle. The more paintings you have the more you have to select from when presenting to a customer or visitor or gallery or agent or whatever. And of course the more outlets you have the more paintings you'll need too. Despite having probably about 50 paintings available at the moment it's never enough for me! I need 4-5 at least for each gallery and if I'm looking for new spaces I always needs the same number to put there. Plus some to have in the studio. So I'm continually painting more even when I haven't sold recently. So if I have sold I have even more to catch up on! :D So if you are surrounded by paintings you must be successful or on the path thataways...

Tina.

champagneharley
12-01-2003, 08:46 AM
Originally posted by timelady
Jillian,
Just thought this might make you feel better about all those paintings... the more successful you are the more you need! In fact, you need more to be successful too. It's like always moving in a circle. The more paintings you have the more you have to select from when presenting to a customer or visitor or gallery or agent or whatever. And of course the more outlets you have the more paintings you'll need too. Despite having probably about 50 paintings available at the moment it's never enough for me! I need 4-5 at least for each gallery and if I'm looking for new spaces I always needs the same number to put there. Plus some to have in the studio. So I'm continually painting more even when I haven't sold recently. So if I have sold I have even more to catch up on! :D So if you are surrounded by paintings you must be successful or on the path thataways...

Tina.
Thanks Tina,
I think I know what you mean.
I still find it hard to justify having so many unsold paintings around, knowing the cost and time outlaid - when that is all family and friends look at.
Thanks for you comments.
Regards,
Jillian

midcoast
12-01-2003, 04:36 PM
Wow Jillian, I understand what you're going through. I am much the same way!!! Ugh! I ALWAYS feel the need to be marketing, and I feel much better about a piece if someone has purchased it.

What I am doing currently is working in phases...I adapted this from weight training principles :) and I have to apply some discipline!! Anyway, right now I am FORCING myself to only paint and do very little to no marketing. About all I am doing is keeping my website updated. This is because I had little stock on hand to show to galleries or to enter into competitions, and I needed to focus on creating. I am also forcing myself ;) to take workshops now and learn as much as I can. I will do this until I have about 24 gallery-quality paintings that I can start to market.

Next phase (early 2004 most likely) I will force myself to cut back a bit on my painting and do some serious marketing, within a set budget. Galleries will be my primary marketing focus. I'll also try to get some pieces in doctor's offices, vet clinics, etc., just to get my work "out there." I'll probably do a mailing of a brochure or postcards, try to make gallery contacts, and do as many shows as I can get juried into.

I don't really think that this is a bad way to be...wanting to sell your work I mean. My goal is to be a self-supporting artist, and in order to do that, I have to sell my work :)

I'm not sure if any of this has helped...I just wanted to share what I do. I'll let you know if any of this works next year!

Nancy

Keith Russell
12-01-2003, 05:23 PM
Nancy, that's a good strategy, and I'm doing basically the same thing myself right now.

Sure, it's nice to sell something, anything, to anyone.

But, a career in art doesn't advance based on sales--not even a few good sales. Selling to the general public, to whoever happens to walk by your booth at a local mall art show, or to whoever happens to be having a cappucino at the local coffee shop during the three weeks your work is on display there, might pay the bills.

It won't, however, greatly increase your prices, get your work into galleries, get your work published, get your work seen by serious collectors, etc.

That takes a bit more strategy than just hoping that someone with a serious interest in art just 'happens' to have the same doctor as you...

K

Toadie
12-01-2003, 06:57 PM
I looked at your work and was blown away. You are exstreamly talented. Perhaps (as you know already) this is a problem of the ID...:)
Michelle

Keith Russell
12-01-2003, 07:57 PM
...as opposed to the 'ego'...?

K

champagneharley
12-01-2003, 10:35 PM
Originally posted by nrynes
Wow Jillian, I understand what you're going through. I am much the same way!!! Ugh! I ALWAYS feel the need to be marketing, and I feel much better about a piece if someone has purchased it.

What I am doing currently is working in phases...I adapted this from weight training principles :) and I have to apply some discipline!! Anyway, right now I am FORCING myself to only paint and do very little to no marketing. About all I am doing is keeping my website updated. This is because I had little stock on hand to show to galleries or to enter into competitions, and I needed to focus on creating. I am also forcing myself ;) to take workshops now and learn as much as I can. I will do this until I have about 24 gallery-quality paintings that I can start to market.

Next phase (early 2004 most likely) I will force myself to cut back a bit on my painting and do some serious marketing, within a set budget. Galleries will be my primary marketing focus. I'll also try to get some pieces in doctor's offices, vet clinics, etc., just to get my work "out there." I'll probably do a mailing of a brochure or postcards, try to make gallery contacts, and do as many shows as I can get juried into.

I don't really think that this is a bad way to be...wanting to sell your work I mean. My goal is to be a self-supporting artist, and in order to do that, I have to sell my work :)

I'm not sure if any of this has helped...I just wanted to share what I do. I'll let you know if any of this works next year!

Nancy
Oh, I'm so glad for your input. I think you have inspired me to do more actual artwork. Can the promo stuff for the time being, or if I do promo, then hit only one or 2 potential markets!
Appreciate it so much!
I'll let you know how I go.
Regards,
Jillian

champagneharley
12-01-2003, 10:36 PM
Nancy, I'm also pleased that you do the same re marketing!
Regards,
Jillian

champagneharley
12-01-2003, 10:40 PM
Originally posted by Keith Russell
Nancy, that's a good strategy, and I'm doing basically the same thing myself right now.

Sure, it's nice to sell something, anything, to anyone.

But, a career in art doesn't advance based on sales--not even a few good sales. Selling to the general public, to whoever happens to walk by your booth at a local mall art show, or to whoever happens to be having a cappucino at the local coffee shop during the three weeks your work is on display there, might pay the bills.

It won't, however, greatly increase your prices, get your work into galleries, get your work published, get your work seen by serious collectors, etc.

That takes a bit more strategy than just hoping that someone with a serious interest in art just 'happens' to have the same doctor as you...

K
I used to make my living from art, but it wasn't the kind of art I wanted to do. I guess I didn't appreciate the 'good' thing I was on. It was a niche market, and so I guess I'm looking for the niche again, and that is why I never stop searching.
Regards,
Jillian

champagneharley
12-01-2003, 10:42 PM
Originally posted by angelryd
I looked at your work and was blown away. You are exstreamly talented. Perhaps (as you know already) this is a problem of the ID...:)
Michelle
Michelle, that is a lovely remark. Thank you. I always am a little insecure, as I am not as good as I wish I were, and sometimes my efforts to go forth in art are not as solid as they should be, because of self-doubt.
Thanx again,
Regards,
Jillian

marilyn h
12-02-2003, 03:48 PM
Jillian. I have been in your spot, once upon a time. I couldn't wait to sell. It became an obsession. I finally sold. Then started painting to sell. Not what I liked, but what would sell. (nothing wrong with that) except, I lost my drive for what I liked.

I now paint for me! I was talking with some friends today, and told them that I own an acre lot and I could probably cover it with all my art if I sat them side by side.

I have not gone out to sell myself. Nor have I gone on ebay as yet. I just gave notice on my job so I might try that route. But, it doesn't matter. I paint for me, or should I say draw, to keep my skills in tact and to enjoy the pleasure of you and yours on WC. It has been my life saver in a lot of ways. Just knowing that there are others in the process of learning. I am the sponge that is soaking it all in. Just wish I could do it all.

Patience in your art. Don't feel like your drowning, but swimming in strides.

pampe
12-02-2003, 08:38 PM
Jillian

I am struck by a couple things:

do you have a plan? (business plan)

Don't tell me not to feel this way,

I won;t but you need to know that feeling that way is a choice....you can choose to feel otherwise



I always am a little insecure, as I am not as good as I wish I were, and sometimes my efforts to go forth in art are not as solid as they should be, because of self-doubt.

again...you can chose to stop the self doubt...there are ways


I think Marilyn's comments are spot on......and if you have a plan, your strides can be measured and planned


Wishing you the best

Keith Russell
12-02-2003, 11:11 PM
pampe, I have a business plan (a very loose business plan).

How far ahead should an artist look?

My plan will take me through next year, and I've sketched out the next five years, but just barely.

Plenty of room for revisions, but maybe not as organized as I ought to be...

...?

K

pampe
12-03-2003, 07:01 PM
Keith, I have no idea what you SHOULD have but I do know that having a PLAN helps in any endeavor.

And of course you have to be flexible and ready to revise it.

But when the going gets rough and those days come....you will have something to fall back on.

I think a LONG RANGE general plan is good and a SHORT RANGE specific plan.....one year is good.....then at the end of a year you firm up the next one


I find that my creativity flows better when I don;t have to mull over all the business stuff......

IMHO

champagneharley
12-07-2003, 12:49 PM
It is so difficult to have ANY plan - long or short if you have moved countries, and have no idea of any future at all.
Whether staying or going or traveling.
Regards,
Jillian

GavOZ
12-07-2003, 10:58 PM
I have the exact opposite problem!
I don't sell my art as I really love to walk around my house, garage, attic etc and see it anytime I wish. On rare occasions I have given work to CLOSE family members as presents, and they proudly display it in their homes. And of course, I can see it anytime I visit them. To me art is what makes me smile, and in this world today if you only ever smile when money is involved, then you risk missing out on a lot of smiling.

PS. Your work makes me smile too! ;)

champagneharley
12-07-2003, 11:32 PM
Originally posted by GavOZ
I have the exact opposite problem!
I don't sell my art as I really love to walk around my house, garage, attic etc and see it anytime I wish. On rare occasions I have given work to CLOSE family members as presents, and they proudly display it in their homes. And of course, I can see it anytime I visit them. To me art is what makes me smile, and in this world today if you only ever smile when money is involved, then you risk missing out on a lot of smiling.

PS. Your work makes me smile too! ;)
I know there are people like this, but primarily I'm a perfectionist, and to see the errors in my works everytime I look at it is like being punished and told I'm wrong, over and over.

Having family that never appreciated art who, in the same breath, when showing them my new piece of art said:
"That's nice dear, have you sold it?"
To them it wasn't worth doing, if it was not worth something. I still struggle with the same. I also don't know what to do with all my works.
Regards,
Jillian

GavOZ
12-07-2003, 11:47 PM
You rarely meet creative people that are totally satisfied with their work. My critera for finished work is simple - If my next idea is just too hard to resist starting on, then I stop and move on. No doubt you can gauge from my comments, that I don't rely on selling art to eat, thus it makes it easy for me to have this attitude. I get enormous pleasure from the creative arts, whether it be painting, drawing, cooking, playing music etc, etc - but at the end of the day I set out to make ME happy. It's a real bonus when you actually make someone else happy too. :cat:

champagneharley
12-08-2003, 12:00 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by GavOZ
You rarely meet creative people that are totally satisfied with their work. My critera for finished work is simple - If my next idea is just too hard to resist starting on, then I stop and move on. No doubt you can gauge from my comments, that I don't rely on selling art to eat, thus it makes it easy for me to have this attitude. I get enormous pleasure from the creative arts, whether it be painting, drawing, cooking, playing music etc, etc - but at the end of the day I set out to make ME happy. It's a real bonus when you actually make someone else happy too. :cat: [/QUOTE}
I can stop my work, and move on. And I am usually happy, until I look at it again, and then spot all the errors.
I guess it's like going to a stage production. My enjoyment of it is sometimes spoilt, as I spend so much time analysing the whole production, the costumes, how did they do this, how did they think of that, why did they do this, etc.
To me the ultimate though is to have someone pay out hard earned cash for one of my works.
I get friends who love my work, and always say so. I watch them buy other work, but not mine. They are happy enough to receive it as a gift, but I wonder why they don't ever want to buy it.
Regards,
Jillian

GavOZ
12-08-2003, 12:25 AM
As a flip-side to that - maybe all your friends are secretly hoping that you will give them an artwork for Xmas. I'm secretly hoping you'll send one over to the east coast here just to shut me up - LOL
:D

champagneharley
12-08-2003, 07:55 AM
Originally posted by GavOZ
As a flip-side to that - maybe all your friends are secretly hoping that you will give them an artwork for Xmas. I'm secretly hoping you'll send one over to the east coast here just to shut me up - LOL
:D
*LOL*
Sure thing, what do you want?
Nude, floral?
:)
Tho, since my friends have known me as an artist for years, I have given away some many years ago, but have not since I got 'serious' and also had my own gallery. Surely having a gallery would have been a BIG hint that I wasn't dealing in 'give away' art any more. :D
Regards,
Jillian

Toadie
12-08-2003, 08:10 AM
I understand the part of not ever being totally satisfied with a finished painting. None of mine are ever finished as far s I am concerned.:) It seems like you understand the problem going back to your parents "view" of art. I too have pin pointed problems with in myself arising from childhood and do not understand why I cannot fix them if I can identify them. You are aware of the problem and where it stems from , I guess the best thing would be to work on that.
It is hard for me to bee live that you do not sell ALLOT of work, you are great !!!!
Michelle

champagneharley
12-08-2003, 08:42 AM
Originally posted by angelryd
I understand the part of not ever being totally satisfied with a finished painting. None of mine are ever finished as far s I am concerned.:) It seems like you understand the problem going back to your parents "view" of art. I too have pin pointed problems with in myself arising from childhood and do not understand why I cannot fix them if I can identify them. You are aware of the problem and where it stems from , I guess the best thing would be to work on that.
It is hard for me to bee live that you do not sell ALLOT of work, you are great !!!!
Michelle
I always know a stopping point with my work. It's just I see areas afterwards where I think I could have, should have done this or that, therefore they are not the 'perfection' that I aimed for.
I consider myself 'intelligent' and knowing the sources of my discontent I feel like I SHOULD be able to debunk them and overcome them. The only time I am able to is when I have someone close to me admiring my work and re-inforcing me - just strangers and friends are not enough. But have only had that once in my life, and is no longer there, and as time goes by I wonder how much was truth, and yet I feel it was.
I am trying to work on it though.
Thank you for your compliments.
Maybe I just need a manager/agent.
Regards,
Jillian

GavOZ
12-08-2003, 04:35 PM
Hi Jillian,
As a final comment. I have to wonder just how many of the ol masters had yobbo's (for our American mates - 'Rednecks') for relatives. I could just imagine Monet's father saying 'Get a haircut and get a real job!'. The really sad part of all this is, that te yobbo's still wouldn't recognise the gift even when the rest of the world stands back in awe. I hope you fight your demons (we all have demons of one form or another) and win because your artistic talent speaks for itself. bye for now. Gav ... :angel:

champagneharley
12-08-2003, 04:50 PM
Originally posted by GavOZ
Hi Jillian,
As a final comment. I have to wonder just how many of the ol masters had yobbo's (for our American mates - 'Rednecks') for relatives. I could just imagine Monet's father saying 'Get a haircut and get a real job!'. The really sad part of all this is, that te yobbo's still wouldn't recognise the gift even when the rest of the world stands back in awe. I hope you fight your demons (we all have demons of one form or another) and win because your artistic talent speaks for itself. bye for now. Gav ... :angel:
*LOL*
Actually I DO believe that some of the masters did have parents that told them to get a real job. Though many also tried to get them art jobs as it once was a MOST honoured profession.
Thanx Gav
All your comments and compliments most appreciated.
I've been procrastinating on an illustration I've been commissioned to paint, and so that hasn't helped. Did the initial work today, and got back OK comments. So maybe I was being hard on myself.
Regards,
Jillian