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ivan1
07-20-2001, 08:08 AM
As a beginer painting landscapes I find I use alot of green and have purchased probably too many tubes of various green. I would be interested in what greens others use in their pallet.This is the list of what I found in my paint box.

Winsor green- WN ( I believe this is phthalo green)
Permanent Sap Green- WN
Olive Green- WN
Cobalt Green -Golden
Chromium Oxide Green- Golden

Patrick1
07-20-2001, 09:49 AM
For landscapes, I only use three greens (they're all I will probably ever need for landscapes):

-sap or hookers green (for foliage & grasses)
-for foliage highlights, phthalo yellow-green
-for clean, intense greens, I use phthalo green (I use blue shade, but you may prefer yellow shade)

And with phthalo green BS and phthalo blue GS, you can make beautiful, intense turquiose.

Einion
07-20-2001, 11:28 PM
Hi Ivan, you might like to take a look <A HREF=http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=14554>here</A> in the Color Theory/Mixing forum. I started a discussion on the twin-primary system which will touch on a lot of mixing issues you may find useful.

As you can see I don't really subscribe to buying secondaries so I would be the first to agree you can have too many greens :) I must admit though that I don't have any need for very bright greens (or other secondaries) but if you do some of the single-pigment greens are important to have, the phthalo greens probably being the most versatile.

Until recently the only green I had, in fact the only one I can even remember owning, is Viridian (or one of the Phthalocyanine Greens, I canít be sure what it is), prefering to mix any other greens I needed - obviously I like mixing paint :) I added Chromium Oxide Green only a couple of weeks ago partly as a good complement for Cadmium Red Medium (almost identical values) and also simply to see what its character was like as I have read about it for so long. Despite prefering Finity I went with the Liquitex medium-viscosity colour as the W&N example is very different from the typical hue for this colour (much more blue).

The good news is that all the colours you list are extremely lightfast and three of them (Winsor Green, Cobalt Green and Chromium Oxide Green) are single-pigment colours. There is some very useful information on the <A HREF=http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/wcolor.html>Handprint</A> site about palettes with a specific comment that I thought would be very helpful but I can't find it! Basically it said using a pigment green is a good way of mixing a family of related hues easily. From a landscape-painting perspective this makes a lot of sense.

Einion

P.S. Don't feel bad having five greens, Old Holland apparently make something like 35! There, you feel better now, don't you? :D

ivan1
07-21-2001, 11:55 AM
Thank you for your help. I will check out the threads and sites you recomend. I think I will take your advice and try to stick to single pigment greens.

Einion
07-21-2001, 05:50 PM
Hi Ivan, yep single-pigment greens are a good idea but there's no reason not to use the other two since you have them anyway, as I said they will be made from very reliable ingredients - if you check the label you will see which pigments are used for the mix which you can replicate yourself and save $$ for the future if you're so inclined.

I meant to ask, how do you like the Cobalt Green? From what I've seen it is a beautiful hue but it is supposed to be very weak tinctorially so I was wondering how you've found it to work with. Some watercolourists like its very muted character but I haven't read any comments about it being used thickly like in oils or acrylic.

Einion

sarkana
07-22-2001, 10:25 AM
single pigment greens are much stronger and more economical in general than mixtures in my opinion. you should be able to get by with 2 greens, i think. but there's nothing wrong with experimentation.

Winsor green- WN ( I believe this is phthalo green)
--no, it's a mixture. i'd guess it s closer to permanent green.

Permanent Sap Green- WN
--sap greens are a mixture of yellow ochre, phthalo green, and black

Olive Green- WN
--another mixture. there is no such pigment

Cobalt Green -Golden
--a lovely single pigment, but so weak i almost never use it

Chromium Oxide Green- Golden
--a kick-ass pigment, a true workhorse!

you probably only need one cool green and one warm green. i recommend chome ox green and phthalo green.

Einion
07-23-2001, 02:47 PM
Originally posted by sarkana
...you should be able to get by with 2 greens, i think.... you probably only need one cool green and one warm green. i recommend chome ox green and phthalo green. Yep, I got by with only one for twenty years! :)
Roger on the two greens, and those are probably the best two single-pigment greens in acrylics.

Winsor green... no, it's a mixture. i'd guess it s closer to permanent green.
This name is not used by W&N for acrylics on this side of the Atlantic but it might be in the States, I'm not sure. However it is phthalocyanine green in both oils and watercolours.

Chromium Oxide Green... a kick-ass pigment, a true workhorse!
Yep, ain't it great?! I've only had mine for a couple of weeks but I can already see how useful it is going to be.

Einion