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Equineartchick
11-23-2003, 02:32 PM
MY IMAGE(S):
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/upload_spool/11-23-2003/31975_firstplacepintoscan2.JPG


GENERAL INFORMATION:
Title: Winter Sky
Year Created: 2002
Medium: Oil
Surface: Canvas
Dimension: 9x11
Allow digital alterations?: Yes!

MY COMMENTS:
This painting was my third oil, and I really liked it. It won first place in an equine art contest in the under 18 category.

MY QUESTIONS FOR THE GROUP:
I would really like to improve my use of paint technique. Although I enjoy my work, it seems flat and boring. There are no vibrant colors and texture. How can I obtain these things?

mfoxmelanson
11-23-2003, 02:56 PM
I'm sorry, I don't know enough to tell you how to improve your technique except to tell you what I do to try to improve mine- experiment. Asking questions is good, too. I hope someone has better answers!! There is something else I'd like to comment on- I hope you don't mind. I've noticed- in the two horses you've posted- that you've left part of them invisible( the same as the background)- If this is a pattern for you, it might be something you want to explore, rather than try to fix.. As far as the rest of this painting, I love that big tree! And if I HAD to pick one thing that bothered me, it would be the pole between the horses legs-OUCH!!:D Congratulations on your award!

M.

HRobinson
11-23-2003, 03:47 PM
It's a different gig for each artist but the key to much of what your question is about has to deal with observation. As an example: If that one lighter limb is above us and we would be looking at the shaded side of it, why is it lighter than the rest?
There are an infinite number of shading values to any object that sits in light. Artists have to decide how many they want to portray to their viewers.

You can get more from doing a search or post your question in the oil forum as there are some greats that lurk therin.

As far as your post here: A frontally foreshortened head is not a view "normally" shown when the horse is the subject, as it seems unnatural but as a whole you have rendered the animal nicely. The body colors look feasible and there are a few elements that need more exploration, i.e., the white plants, but you have shown that you have what it takes to be recognized as being among your peers, here.

-Harry

pero lane
11-24-2003, 01:51 PM
Observe and practice, practice, practice! Your knowledge of equine anatomy is excellant!:)

nancymae
11-24-2003, 04:08 PM
Welcome to Wet Canvas!!! Waukesha is where I grew up!! (well in chronilogical age that is). I now live in upper Wisconsin, about 70 miles northwest of Green Bay...in beautiful Crivitz!!!

I started painting when I was a young girl. Horses were my first love also!! You have already a great mastery of the drawing of the horse...so I know that you have observed them!! I think if I had a suggestion, I would work on values in your paintings. I think that values (dramatic or sutle) makes or breaks a painting. I think your values on the horse are wonderful....but maybe it's the computer image, but the legs seem a little washed out. Putting a dark behind them would bring them out.

I know NOTHING about oils...being a pastel/watercolor artist....so I can't help ya there!!

Keep posting....love to see horse paintings!!!

Nancy