PDA

View Full Version : Shipping and Pick up of Artwork for Show


Mamalynn
06-06-2019, 10:24 PM
I am thinking of submitting some pieces for a juried show out of state. I have only been in shows where I can drive the piece there and pick up on the last day. How do you get work to a show, uncrated, and get it picked up on the last day and mailed back home. I know nothing about this and really need some guidance. Thanks tons

water girl
06-07-2019, 12:34 AM
I purchased an Air Float box , Air Float (https://airfloatsystems.com/), which I've used several times. Do not seal the box when taking it to be mailed. You must have the prepaid return info inside the box before mailing. In some shows you have to pay someone to unbox your painting, then repack it for return. There should be clear instructions for that when you enter the show. Good luck!

Mamalynn
06-07-2019, 01:16 AM
Thanks so much for this information!!! I am considering submitting paintings to PSA. I don't see instructions other than a mailing address on show submit. I assume Air Float is to prepay for return. Is it the case if a painting is accepted that they give you guidelines about paying someone to unbox and repack? I doubt I will be accepted but I am trying to figure out if the process is too expensive to consider. Karen, you have probably been in PSA so any info you recall would be great.

contumacious
06-07-2019, 02:35 AM
Beyond protecting the frame and the glass with proper packaging, if you want to be as sure as possible that your piece will arrive looking exactly like it did when you put it in the frame - as in no pastel dust on the glass, caught between the mat and the glass or all over the mat.......

For a reasonably high chance of it arriving that way, you can ship it with "no tip" special handling and pay through the nose for the guarantee that it will travel the entire trip in the same "Up" orientation.

or

For a 100% sure method that there won't be any pastel dust floaters ruining your presentation, frame your painting with the glass in contact with the pastel. Particularly when framed with coated anti reflective glazing, your pastel will also look significantly better on the wall than with an air gap between the glass and the painting. Just be sure not to use the "Museum" brand AR glass that has the easily scratched coating on the inside. Your best bet is the AR glazing from GroGlass. The glass seems to disappear. I wish I had discovered this framing method 20 years earlier.

https://www.artistsnetwork.com/art-mediums/pastel/pastel-pointers-blog-passe-partout-framing/

This method only works with mat-less framing but does work great with wood based "mats" called liners, be they solid wood or fabric covered. The liner goes in the frame opening and the sealed glass / pastel packages goes into the liner.

Mamalynn
06-07-2019, 09:33 AM
Oh thanks so much, this article is very helpful. I planned to frame without mat so this approach is great. Still wondering how it gets unpacked and repacked for shipping back to me on the last day of the exhibit

water girl
06-07-2019, 12:35 PM
You have to wait for an acceptance letter from PSA. Make sure your submitted image or images are high quality. Once your work is accepted, they will send you instructions. The Air Float System is a heavy duty cardboard box with sturdy foam to sandwich your painting. You would place your painting inside the box, and put your prepaid label and information PSA requests. There are usually forms, requests for a bio, etc. Then the shipper, like UPS, will seal and mail for you. So far, I've not had an issue with dust.

contumacious
06-07-2019, 12:51 PM
Oh thanks so much, this article is very helpful. I planned to frame without mat so this approach is great. Still wondering how it gets unpacked and repacked for shipping back to me on the last day of the exhibit

The show people generally take care of putting it back in the shipping box but it can vary as noted already. If they aren't going to repack it, be prepared to pay quite a bit more for paying someone else like a third party UPS shipper or actual UPS or FedEx to pick it up pack it for you. You can create your own return label online at UPS / FeDex or USPS and include that with the shipment, thus no need to wait until you take it to the shipper. Use the same details as the outgoing shipment, just reverse the to and from info I just print mine out on plain paper but self adhesive half 8.5x11 labels are ideal. Make sure to get a fairly accurate weight and round up the dimension information.

So far, I've not had an issue with dust.

You must have good karma. May it continue forever for you! :D I have seen some pretty ugly looking loose pastel dust in my own and other peoples stuff with spacers and spacing mats that were shipped long distances. I say why run the risk of having something that could literally cost you an award when it is so easy to eliminate that risk. The added bonus is this framing method makes your pastel look significantly better than any other spacer designed framing technique, which can add to your chances of placing in the show. I have seen some really nice pieces in national shows that were removed as a choice by the judges for an award because of framing problems.

Mamalynn
06-07-2019, 05:39 PM
Thank you so much for all this information, really invaluable. I hope I need it:)

Mamalynn
06-07-2019, 05:46 PM
Interesting side note. I went to the framer I use today and told him about Richard McKinley's article regarding framing. He had a heart attack about the method of placing the pastel right against the glass although he knew that Alan Flattmann does it quite a bit, who ships around the country. His objection is one of conservation. He said that if you ever have to separate the glass from the from the art you will lift off a lot of pastel. I guess everything is a trade off.

contumacious
06-10-2019, 03:19 PM
Interesting side note. I went to the framer I use today and told him about Richard McKinley's article regarding framing. He had a heart attack about the method of placing the pastel right against the glass although he knew that Alan Flattmann does it quite a bit, who ships around the country. His objection is one of conservation. He said that if you ever have to separate the glass from the from the art you will lift off a lot of pastel. I guess everything is a trade off.

I should have warned you that if you asked pretty much any framer or pastel artist you would get that type of a response. Your framer is incorrect and has obviously never tried it or they would not be spreading that false warning. You will hear the same "horror" story from most traditional framing shops who are ignorant of the process, which is pretty sad considering that they are presenting themselves as educated and trained professionals. I find it funny that most pastel artists cover their pastels in progress with a glassine cover sheet, which does more damage than a sheet of glass ever could yet they recoil at the idea of using glass this way. I have opened up pieces framed like this years later with zero problems.

I couldn't find a single framer who would do this method. I had to learn to do it myself. I have use it on almost all my pastel framing jobs and have done so for many years. I have personally tested it extensively and have also talked to many other artists, several here on WC who have used it for decades with outstanding results and no problems.

The fact is that there is almost always LESS loose pastel dust that comes away on the glass than you would get if you had framed it with spacers or a mat, for any piece that has been carried about in a car, taken to shows and galleries or shipped by UPS. Sure, if the painting is never moved from the horizontal face up position, never shipped or transported by car, then the spacer method will have less loose pastel dust in it, but how many pieces will be treated that way? None of mine for sure. Don't take my word for it, try it yourself. Take a fully covered pastel test piece, lay it face up on some foam core and carefully set some clean glass on it then put some books on top of that without shifting the glass, and let it sit for a while. Remove the books and the glass lifting straight up and examine the glass and the painting under strong light. If you were careful there will be very little visible pastel on the glass. Sometimes there is none. Then take a piece the exact size of your test piece of glass and seal it up like on the link and carry it around in a tote bag or in your pastel bag kit a month. Take it apart and see if anything is messed up. If you did it right and the glass was unable to move at all, it will look the same as when you put it in there. Try the same thing with both framing styles, the sealed glass in contact sandwich and a matted or spacer framed piece laid face down in shipping boxes in your trunk for a week or so to simulate a trip in a bumpy UPS truck, and see what happens to each.

When you need to un-frame it for whatever reason, if you carefully remove the glass lifting it straight up without letting it slide you will see very little pastel stuck on the glass surface, with no changes to the look of the piece, unless you had some really thick clumps that would have been knocked off for being too thick using any framing method. You may see some very tall peaks that are flattened when the glass is first applied, but they never would have lasted in a spacer frame. Just be aware of those when you go to frame it REGARDLESS of the method you use. They need to be tapped off first. You will not get smudging or changing of the image while it is in the sealed package. Don't forget that the painting will almost always look significantly better framed this way. That is the main reason I do it, since I don't ship my stuff very often.

I have no doubts at all that nothing can come close to disturbing your full coverage pastel LESS, especially when shipping it, than putting the glass in contact with the surface and securing it like is described in the link. I have never damaged a piece framing this way. There are pastels framed like this that are over 100 years old that were in perfect shape when removed from the glass sandwich. Unless you live in a tropical climate or hang the piece outside or by a shower, you will not have mold issues caused by the glass contact. If you get mold in a really humid place with the glass in contact you would have most likely gotten it with spacers or a mat as well.

This type of framing is really meant for full coverage pastels. I would not suggest using it with thinly applied pastel on plain paper, or any pastel with uncovered paper showing. Definitely don't use this with anything non dry pastel on plain paper such as oil pastels, acrylics, pen and ink or watercolors or you will end up with problems later such as mold / fungus or stains on the glass, as well as the chance of the paper sticking to the glass.

There is something about the thicker dry pigment layer on top of the pastel paper acting as a buffer area between the paper and the glass that allows this to work. Personally I would only do the glass in contact method with waterproof sanded papers like UArt, Pastel Premier or hardboard pastel panels, rather than traditional pastel papers but it will work with regular paper as long a you have FULL coverage with pastel pigment. A perfectly flat backer board that is the same size as the pastel painting and the glass is vital to creating the sealed "package". Don't try it without taping all the edges carefully. I use acid free crystal clear framers tape but you can use opaque tape if you are careful so it doesn't extend past the rabbet of the frame.

contumacious
06-11-2019, 02:41 AM
Despite my rather long post above debunking the pastel being ruined by sticking to the glass, I don't think I emphasized enough about the real beauty of this system which is two fold - the total elimination of all free roaming pastel dust as well as environmental dust, within your frame package plus the significantly enhanced look of the painting, particularly with AR glass. I ONLY use AR glass with any pastel I care about. Just stay away from the UV blocking coated "Museum" brand as the UV coating on the art side is too easily scratched and smudged, plus it costs more, so you are paying more for an inferior product. Go with Groglass Waterwhite AR glazing or their AR/UV option if you want the extra UV protection. When someone who sees one of their own pieces framed this way for the first time with some AR Waterwhite glazing, they are usually taken aback by how wonderful it looks. I am not exaggerating when I say that it could possibly push you into a winning position over a regularly framed piece. It gives higher contrast, brighter colors, sharper looking marks and an overall more professional looking presentation with reduced reflections that detract from viewing the image in a gallery. As for the loose dust problems already discussed that can happen with shipping, you simply will not find pastel dust in random places where you don't want it as it can't migrate around because there is no open cavity between the glass and the pastel surface. It just stays were it was on the pastel painting.

(Can you tell I am 100% sold on this process?) :lol:

Mamalynn
06-18-2019, 12:19 AM
What a great post and so sorry for being delayed in seeing it!!! How totally helpful. I haven't learned to frame my own art but it is time to do so given the expense of framing. I will try this. I have to say that I was so disappointed when I picked up a piece this week that was done with spaces. The colors seemed so dull even though it was AR glass.

This framing caution seems to be akin to framers telling you that you must use fixative to keep pastel attached to sanded surfaces. Clearly not true and it of course ruins the piece. As you know, so many framers will refuse to frame if you don't use fixative on the last layers. I have never done so and never had pastel fall loosely into the frame. Thanks once again for the detailed explanation. So appreciated.

contumacious
06-18-2019, 02:16 AM
You are welcome! Try it with a test piece so you have nothing to lose if the entire painting sticks to the glass like your framer said it would. :angel:

The nice thing about making the package is it can be done with virtually no tools. All you need is your pastel, a backer board and a sheet of glass, all three cut to exactly the same size. Line everything up and carefully seal the edges with some framing tape. You can then pop that into virtually any frame made for oil paintings and you are good to go. If you sell unframed pieces, this is by far the best way to ship a painting. It arrives with no chance of damage if packaged right. When your customer gets it they can put it in a frame themselves with minimal skill required.

pprender
07-07-2019, 01:54 AM
Could you describe how you safely package the glass/painting sandwich?

pastelartprints
07-13-2019, 03:27 AM
This is also one of the right option of artwork to show. But I think if you sale your paintings online, then it can be more wonderful as well as it increases in the sale too. Offer some coupon code on your paintings to attract the clients.

barbr555
11-12-2019, 03:00 PM
Thanks god I found this thread. This is an answer to all my questions

buy essay (https://buyessay.net/)

franglais
11-13-2019, 09:43 AM
Could someone recommend a good Web site with reasonable prices and good customer service for the Groglass AR? I definitely want to try the passe-partout framing. Also, what type of tape would you recommend to seal around the edges? Any particular brand better than another? THANKS!
Mike

contumacious
11-14-2019, 07:38 AM
Could someone recommend a good Web site with reasonable prices and good customer service for the Groglass AR? I definitely want to try the passe-partout framing. Also, what type of tape would you recommend to seal around the edges? Any particular brand better than another? THANKS!
Mike

Groglass sources


I buy my glass from a framing supply wholesaler called CMI. There are likely others who stock the Groglass / Artglass AR. Perhaps contact the maker and ask for suppliers near you. www.groglass.com (http://www.groglass.com)

http://www.cmimoulding.com/


You can also get it online here: https://www.framedestination.com/framing-supplies/glass-and-acrylic/artglass-ww-ar.html

Framing / Artists tape


I have used white and clear artists / framers tapes with good results. The clear is less visible with narrow rabbet frames. Any archival tape that is thin enough to wrap around the edges and strong enough to hold up well will work.

https://www.dickblick.com/products/framers-tape-ii/

https://www.cheapjoes.com/cheap-joe-s-acid-free-framer-s-tape.html

https://www.jerrysartarama.com/artists-white-tape

Packaging / Shipping the "Sandwich"

Could you describe how you safely package the glass/painting sandwich? (sorry about the extremely late reply. I had notification turned off on this thread.)

I wrap the sandwich in some butcher paper, then at least an inch of bubble wrap on all sides, then that goes in a box with another inch or more of packing material around it to stabilize it inside the box. Double boxing gives some added protection for large / expensive pieces. You can also use ridged foam insulation sheets to build a box liner for the piece.

https://www.uline.com/grp_9_Sideloaders/

franglais
11-15-2019, 09:34 AM
Thank you for all you have shared. I don't live near any location to purchase, so I will try Frame Destination.

I have not entered any pastel competitions, but I am wondering if there are any restrictions regarding the passe-partout framing method for certain competitions??


Thanks again!
Best regards!


Mike