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learning to paint
09-07-2000, 08:03 PM
I'm shopping for an easel. Suggestions of any kind are welcome, especially brands and models.

Any characteristics to keep in mind?

Thanks!

rapolina
09-08-2000, 03:55 AM
I have a question about the use of easel with watercolors: is it really useful and helping? I usually paint on the table and, as i often paint wet on wet, i can't understand how an easel could be used.
Can you give me any suggestions or tips?
http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/eek.gif I'm afraid that my paint runs down the paper!

thankyou and ciao, http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif rapolina

DebAnnWea
09-08-2000, 09:37 AM
it depends on how much space you have to paint in.my art space is in part of the bedroom and I have a thin table to work on,so I'm using a tabletop easel http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

VictoriaS
09-08-2000, 11:48 AM
Learning: See my reply to you in the Pastels forum.

Rapolina: I posted a similar question a few weeks ago. Look down the list of topics and you will see "Do you use an easel?" There were a number of good responses. I have tried a watercolor on the easel since posting that message. The easel I have can tilt to horizontal for wet painting. So I did the wet washes horizontally, and then, for the non-runny painting, tilted it to about 45 degrees or so. I liked that, because painting on a flat surface for long periods bothers my neck. I found the easel helpful for that. I also think you get a better view of your painting when it's vertical.

Katee
09-09-2000, 06:22 PM
Victoria,

What type of easel did you get in the end?

I still haven't got one, still saving up, or waiting for Xmas.

Karen http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

sassybird
09-10-2000, 02:10 PM
Victoria, I understand about the neck pain. I have had 4 cercical surgeries. Tell me how big your easel is please. I have one whole room for my studio, but it is pretty packed. I need something that I can fold up against the wall after working. You are right about being able to see your work better when you can step away. I take my board off the drafting table and set it up on my work table so that I can step back and look at what I have done.

------------------
sass

VictoriaS
09-11-2000, 11:46 AM
I got the Best Lobo Deluxe. I think it was about $169 at Pearl. It was the only one I saw that was advertised as being good for watercolors and pastels, because you can make it horizontal for watercolors, or tilt it forward for pastels.

Size. Hmm. I guess it's about five feet tall when the top tray is not extended. Maybe two or two and a half feet across -- or maybe three (I'm at my office, so can't check now). The height extends to 70". It takes supports up to -- I thought the literature said 34", but someone else tells me it's 44". I think it's about four inches deep when folded up. And I think it folds up easily -- just a matter of turning a knob -- although I don't really know because I leave mine standing.

learning to paint
09-12-2000, 10:17 PM
In my usual (obsessive) way, I visited several stores in NYC that sell easels. Some thoughts:

1. The Julian Half-Box and Winsor-Newton Half Box ("Tweed") are well-made and tilt forward as well as lay flat. Both are mid-weight (10 lbs) and stand on three legs, with a drawer for storage or water/supplies. They cost around $175 and seem like a worthwhile value.

2. The "H-frame" style (Best's Lobo; etc.) are larger and clearly designed for indoor use. They seem more stable than the French tripods, but they also seem a bit cumbersome. If I'm going to work flat, I'd sooner work on a table, I think.

3. I ruled out the tripod with a simple stick and clamps on top and bottom (W&N's Dart, for example). Seems like the ground would flop one side to the other (similar to the problem described by Roan above).

So, I think I'm moving toward the Julian or W&N half box. I'll let everyone know what I buy and whether I'm happy with the result.

Thanks. Further comments welcome, of course.

learning to paint
09-12-2000, 10:19 PM
In my usual (obsessive) way, I visited several stores in NYC that sell easels. Some thoughts:

1. The Julian Half-Box and Winsor-Newton Half Box ("Tweed") are well-made and tilt forward as well as lay flat. Both are mid-weight (10 lbs) and stand on three legs, with a drawer for storage or water/supplies. They cost around $175 and seem like a worthwhile value.

2. The "H-frame" style (Best's Lobo; etc.) are larger and clearly designed for indoor use. They seem more stable than the French tripods, but they also seem a bit cumbersome. If I'm going to work flat, I'd sooner work on a table, I think.

3. I ruled out the tripod with a simple stick and clamps on top and bottom (W&N's Dart, for example). Seems like the ground would flop one side to the other (similar to the problem described by Roan above).

So, I think I'm moving toward the Julian or W&N half box. I'll let everyone know what I buy and whether I'm happy with the result.

Thanks. Further comments welcome, of course.