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View Full Version : Can I use watercolor medium on water mixable oil paint?


calvin_0
04-18-2019, 03:45 AM
while researching oil paint, I discover something call watermixable oil paint which I find very interesting and convenient since I dont need to get orderless turpentine or linseed oil..

however this beg the question.. since it can be mix with water, what about medium? can I use watercolor medium like winsor and newton watercolor iridescent medium (https://www.jacksonsart.com/winsor-newton-watercolour-medium-75ml-iridescent-medium) on watermixable oil paint to make pearlescent or metallic like paint?

Gigalot
04-18-2019, 06:45 AM
WMO is intermixable with with whatever you like. It contains surfactant to help mixing process.

calvin_0
04-19-2019, 08:35 AM
thanks, look like water mixable oil paint would be a suitable replacement for acrylic for model painting since I got the best from both world..

contumacious
04-19-2019, 12:38 PM
I am assuming you are painting on plastics?

Watercolors are not really compatible with oils or WMOs though they might mix into the WMO easily enough. Those who make WMO paints recommend sticking to WMO or regular Oil Paint materials when mixing them.

Another thing to consider is that watercolors are not a permanent paint. Only the pigments are permanent. The carrier used in watercolors is usually Gum Arabic. Some have honey added, others have Aquazol in place of the Gum Arabic - all easily dissolved with water and fairly easily removed mechanically when on a non absorbent surface. They do not adhere well if at all to solid surfaces. They are meant to be used on absorbent surfaces like paper. Even on paper, once dry they are still water soluble. Some people do use watercolors on non absorbent surfaces but they can be very difficult to control and to get it to coat evenly. Once dried they must be coated with a waterproof sealer or they will rub off the surface.

Adding watercolor materials to WMOs would certainly change their nature once dry, the question is how much. Depending on how much you added to the WMO paints, it could remain soft and sticky with moisture contact or humidity years later. Also it may not adhere well and could be be prone to rubbing off with contact. You might get away with adding small amounts of watercolor paints or mediums to the WMO's but you should test it thoroughly first before using it on the final product. Personally, I would avoid adding any materials to the WMOs that remain water soluble once dry. Perhaps see if there is some oil based product that is similar to the watercolor product you are looking it if you definitely want to use WMOs.

You might see something in this video that would work well for painting plastics. They talk about Vinyl and Resin based paints, that might dry more slowly than Acrylics. There are also slow drying Acrylics to consider.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXoWsMlsjTM

Gigalot
04-19-2019, 01:42 PM
Gum Arabic is just another emulsifier for oil paint. It has long history of use with oils to mix oil-tempera stuff. Said, that dried gum arabic / oil paint mix is more permanent over time than pure oil paint, but not as easy to prepare and to use. At least, some authors think so.

contumacious
04-19-2019, 05:17 PM
Gum Arabic is just another emulsifier for oil paint. It has long history of use with oils to mix oil-tempera stuff. Said, that dried gum arabic / oil paint mix is more permanent over time than pure oil paint, but not as easy to prepare and to use. At least, some authors think so.

If one were too add too much watercolor paint or a watercolor medium, to WMOs, would there not be a point where it would cause curing / drying issues? They won't ever cure to a waterproof state on their own, so at some point one would assume that would also happen if mixed with the WMO paint.

calvin_0
04-20-2019, 03:41 AM
I am assuming you are painting on plastics?

yup gunpla to be precise..

I'm not planing to use watercolor with water mixable oil paint, just the waterbase iridescent medium because it kinda look similar to the metallic medium that I used to use with my acrylic paint.

I tend to mix metallic medium into my acrylic paint in 1:1 ratio.. If that is too much would mixing in water mixable linseed oil help solves the problem?

I'm currently also looking in stand oil as it's suppose to eliminate brush stroke entirety.. and I found that apparently they also make a water mixable version (https://www.jacksonsart.com/holbein-duo-aqua-stand-linseed-oil-55ml). the only downside is it also slowing down the dry time.

Gigalot
04-20-2019, 08:37 AM
You can add up to 25% of iridescent acrylic medium into oil paint.

contumacious
04-20-2019, 09:46 AM
Galkyd mixed with oils or WMOs will make them behave similarly to enamel paints, flattening brush strokes, giving it more gloss, plus it will dry faster. If you need the mixed colors to stay wet overnight, using Galkyd / alkyd mediums is not going to work as they will dry on the palette. The open time will be less but probably long enough to do what you need to do. There are probably other brands of alkyd mediums that will do the same thing.

From Gamblin's website:

Galkyd thins oil colors and increases transparency and gloss. When used in greater proportions with oil color, Galkyd will level brush-strokes, creating an enamel-like surface. Galkyd is our fastest-drying painting medium. Thin layers will be touch-dry in approximately 24 hours.

DaveCrow
04-20-2019, 04:11 PM
Have you asked the manufacturer of your WMO? They might have an answer for you.

calvin_0
04-24-2019, 12:31 AM
Galkyd mixed with oils or WMOs will make them behave similarly to enamel paints, flattening brush strokes, giving it more gloss, plus it will dry faster. If you need the mixed colors to stay wet overnight, using Galkyd / alkyd mediums is not going to work as they will dry on the palette. The open time will be less but probably long enough to do what you need to do. There are probably other brands of alkyd mediums that will do the same thing.

From Gamblin's website:

Galkyd thins oil colors and increases transparency and gloss. When used in greater proportions with oil color, Galkyd will level brush-strokes, creating an enamel-like surface. Galkyd is our fastest-drying painting medium. Thin layers will be touch-dry in approximately 24 hours.

thanks for the suggestion, but Galkyd doesnt look like a water mixable medium, i really want to avoid using none water mixable oil medium because i dont want to deal with turpentine..