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Googlies
04-15-2019, 05:28 PM
Hi, what kind of gesso/primer/ground would be best to use with water soluble (mixable) oils?

Thanks.

WFMartin
04-15-2019, 05:52 PM
Probably the same type of acrylic primer that is typically used for traditional oils. That would be one that exhibits a degree of "tooth", so that the oil paint can physically bond with it. My choice of acrylic primer is Grumbacher 525 Acrylic Gesso. I thin it to the consistency of cream, and I brush it on with a household sash brush.

While I have my own opinions, those who recommend the use of WMO's claim them to be "the same as traditional oil paint". Well, of course that can't be totally true, or they wouldn't be sold as "Water Miscible Oil Paints". By pure logic, there HAS to be SOME differences, doesn't there?:lol: :lol:

Googlies
04-15-2019, 06:16 PM
Right, is it really OK to mix acrylic and oils like that though? Or do you have to wait for the gesso to completely dry before you apply your oils to avoid problems?

Like if I want something that I can leave a little workable for when I'm painting, what could I use?

DAK723
04-15-2019, 11:07 PM
Your ground/primer should always be completely dry before applying the paint used in your painting, whether traditional or WMO. So you are not mixing the ground (whether acrylic or oil) with your oil paints. Aside from that, I have never heard anyone mention any particular difference in what ground to use with WMOs compared to traditional oils.

If you are looking for a first layer of paint/medium to paint into as many painters do (as in the Wet on Wet TV painter method) than using a water thinned layer of WMO paint works just fine.

Don

Gigalot
04-16-2019, 07:36 AM
I have never heard anyone mention any particular difference in what ground to use with WMOs compared to traditional oils.

The problem comes with |WMO varnishing. Because of high surfactant content, WMO can attaract moisture and affects several kind of picture varnishes, making them milky and poor looking surface.