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axel9546
04-13-2019, 05:43 PM
Hi guys we have a cloth of linel and cotton for the table top!
Can i paint on this fabric or i need a special linel for art?

RomanB
04-14-2019, 01:47 AM
Generally no, you cannot. Most fabrics nowadays are specially treated before use in domestic applications, which is good for some of their qualities, but not for painting on them.

axel9546
04-14-2019, 02:22 PM
Okay :)
Thats because if i will apply gesso and paint on it which problems i will have?

contumacious
04-14-2019, 04:51 PM
If the fabric is pure linen (or cotton for that matter), then you definitely can use it to paint on. I often check thrift stores for linen table cloths, dresses, shirts or skirts that are big enough to use for adhering to an ACM panel. I have obtained some gorgeous Irish linen for less than $2 a yard. If the weave looks appealing to you, go for it. Be aware that thinner fabric may not stretch very well without tearing. You can use thinner linen that would be too thin to stretch, if you mount it on a rigid panel. Mounted linen / canvas provides a significantly more durable painting surface anyway.

I quite like the color and textured look of raw linen when it is visible in the painting, so I don't cover it with white gesso, using clear acrylic gesso instead to allow the fabric to show through boldly in spots on the finished painting. I really don't like painting on opaquely primed linen or canvas, so I would never use my bargain linen finds in that way for a full coverage painting but you certainly can prime it with white gesso if you want. One advantage to priming it opaquely is that you can hide minor stains on a table cloth with the primer that might not work for a partially covered piece. I would wash whatever you get first with an extra rinse cycle before using it, to get rid of any contaminates or starch that might be in there.

Pinguino
04-14-2019, 05:20 PM
A linen tablecloth (or any other material) is possibly treated with a stain repellent, such as Scotchgard®. If so, then paint may not adhere for a long time, whether or not you treat it with gesso.

However, if the tablecloth will not be folded or cleaned, then paint may adhere well, because it is mechanically gripped to the fibers.

RomanB
04-14-2019, 05:21 PM
Okay :)
Thats because if i will apply gesso and paint on it which problems i will have?

It depends on a type of finish (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finishing_(textiles)) which was applied during manufacturing. Most modern fabrics are treated in several ways, that's why artist's canvases look so raw to our eyes. From conservationists I know that paintings made on table-clothes and buckrams are deteriorating rapidly, having problems with adhesion and decay of fabric's fibres.

contumacious
04-14-2019, 05:58 PM
It depends on a type of finish (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finishing_(textiles)) which was applied during manufacturing. Most modern fabrics are treated in several ways, that's why artist's canvases look so raw to our eyes. From conservationists I know that paintings made on table-clothes and buckrams are deteriorating rapidly, having problems with adhesion and decay of fabric's fibres.

A linen tablecloth (or any other material) is possibly treated with a stain repellent, such as Scotchgard®. If so, then paint may not adhere for a long time, whether or not you treat it with gesso.

However, if the tablecloth will not be folded or cleaned, then paint may adhere well, because it is mechanically gripped to the fibers.


Good to know. As with any art materials that are new to you or from an unknown source, always test first! If you are buying new fabric make sure it is labeled as raw 100% linen. Some factory labels on table cloths and clothing also indicate what they are made from, whether it is treated, a blend or raw linen. Raw, 100% linen can also have a unique feel to it that is quite different from treated / coated linen.

If there are no labels on used fabric, it would be easy enough to check the fabric for a stain resistant coating. Water would bead up on the surface if it has been treated. Everything I have used would soak up water like a sponge and provided extremely good adhesion both of the Beva 371 and the acrylic gesso.

Dcam
04-14-2019, 08:51 PM
Charlie Hunter paints on muslin, a very economical fabric.....also used a lot in set designs.