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View Full Version : Walnut Oil Photo and Question


mickeyw3340
04-10-2019, 03:11 PM
This is from WalMart . Is it ok to use to soak brushes overnight?http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Apr-2019/57955-Walnut_Oil_6163.JPG

AnnieA
04-10-2019, 04:00 PM
I don't think you want roasted walnut oil. Try looking in a health food store, or even a Whole Foods (their price is often quite good), for Spectrum Walnut Oil.

french.painter
04-10-2019, 04:28 PM
It should be OK.
But why the label reads "roasted" as this oil is so pale?

Delofasht
04-10-2019, 07:20 PM
From their literature, it appears to not have any additives and be simply expeller pressed. Should be absolutely fine, probably similar in quality to Spectrum Naturals, but I only have experience with the latter as I never shop at Walmart and have not seen the Hammons brand in the store I do visit. Spectrum can be affordable purchased from several places in my area though and makes a fine oil for my brushes to be stored in (for very extended times I have found).

JCannon
04-10-2019, 08:05 PM
When you think about it, Stand Oil has been mega-roasted. Being a daring lad, I would have no problem painting with this Hammons stuff, if it were given to me, although I might try to "improve" it using Spurgeon's methods.

That said, the price really isn't that good -- $7.48 for 8.4 ounces. Spectrum Naturals is $6.99 for 16 ounces at Wegmans (a mega-store in my area).

contumacious
04-10-2019, 09:37 PM
You can use virtually any vegetable, nut or seed oil at the grocery store to soak / clean your brushes in. Just wipe the oil out of the brush before you use it to paint with.

If you want to use the same oil to mix with your paints, make sure it doesn't have any added ingredients. It needs to be 100% pure cold pressed or expeller extracted oil that has not been over heated in the refining process. Alkali refining is OK and in some instances it may be preferred to unrefined oils. All of these oils below will work for brush cleaning or mixing with paint. They have varied drying times, viscosity and coloration.


Flax Oil / Linseed Oil ( A bit fast drying to soak your brushes in, but it will work.)
Poppy Oil
Safflower Oil
Walnut Oil

Seaside Artist
04-11-2019, 02:18 AM
Spectrum Walnut Oil is pale. The artist grade walnut oil is made from a finer grade of quality walnuts grown here in California. I use Spectrum to clean my brushes during painting sessions and MGraham to mix with my paints when not using Gamblin's SF gel...Yes, there is a difference in my professional experience. It takes very little of either walnut oil so a bottle last a while. I go through one bottle of Spectrum a year. I do not soak my brushes in a jar.

Pinguino
04-11-2019, 12:36 PM
They roast the nuts before pressing the oil. Changes scent/taste slightly. I wouldn't worry about it, for brush cleaning. Just be aware that when any oil is heat-treated (before or after pressing), there are some chemical changes.

AnnieA
04-11-2019, 01:36 PM
You can use virtually any vegetable, nut or seed oil at the grocery store to soak / clean your brushes in. Just wipe the oil out of the brush before you use it to paint with.

If you want to use the same oil to mix with your paints, make sure it doesn't have any added ingredients. It needs to be 100% pure cold pressed or expeller extracted oil that has not been over heated in the refining process. Alkali refining is OK and in some instances it may be preferred to unrefined oils. All of these oils below will work for brush cleaning or mixing with paint. They have varied drying times, viscosity and coloration.


Flax Oil / Linseed Oil ( A bit fast drying to soak your brushes in, but it will work.)
Poppy Oil
Safflower Oil
Walnut Oil


Isn't there some danger in using an oil for cleaning that's not appropriate for painting because it can get into the paint that goes onto the painting? When you mention that the oil for painting needs to "not [have] been over heated in the refining process," that would seem to leave a "roasted" oil out for cleaning too. Or maybe I'm missing something?

contumacious
04-11-2019, 02:22 PM
Isn't there some danger in using an oil for cleaning that's not appropriate for painting because it can get into the paint that goes onto the painting? When you mention that the oil for painting needs to "not [have] been over heated in the refining process," that would seem to leave a "roasted" oil out for cleaning too. Or maybe I'm missing something?

I am pretty sure that as long as you wipe the non pure grocery store oil out of the brush, you won't see much of a change in the drying time. I am running a drying test right now using Safflower oil, just for fun and will post the results in the future. If you use a brush saturated in veggie oil that has anti oxidants added, my guess is it will retard the drying time. How much, I don't know.....yet.

I doubt that the roasted oil has been heated to a point that it has been damaged in some way. Probably more of a marketing / flavor enhancing thing or as mentioned above, they roast the nuts. I couldn't find much information on that oil. Even on their website they don't say if it is virgin, how it was refined or if anything was added to it. I based the heat comment on reading I have done about selecting oils to use for paint making. More than one source said that you do not want to use oils that were extracted using heat methods. I don't recall the reasoning behind that, just the avoidance recommendation.

AnnieA
04-11-2019, 07:04 PM
I am pretty sure that as long as you wipe the non pure grocery store oil out of the brush, you won't see much of a change in the drying time. I am running a drying test right now using Safflower oil, just for fun and will post the results in the future. If you use a brush saturated in veggie oil that has anti oxidants added, my guess is it will retard the drying time. How much, I don't know.....yet.

I doubt that the roasted oil has been heated to a point that it has been damaged in some way. Probably more of a marketing / flavor enhancing thing or as mentioned above, they roast the nuts. I couldn't find much information on that oil. Even on their website they don't say if it is virgin, how it was refined or if anything was added to it. I based the heat comment on reading I have done about selecting oils to use for paint making. More than one source said that you do not want to use oils that were extracted using heat methods. I don't recall the reasoning behind that, just the avoidance recommendation.
OK, and thanks contumacious. It does look like the processing of the oil is pretty good:
Hammons Black Walnut Oil was selected for a Good Food Award 2014 because it is made with wild, all-natural, American Black Walnuts grown free of chemicals, orchards, or pesticides. The nuts are pressed into oil and bottled without the use of chemical extractors, artificial additives, or GM ingredients. In order to qualify for the award, ingredients must also be regionally grown using fair labor practices.
http://www.earthy.com/Hammons-Roasted-Black-Walnut-Oil-from-Earthy-Delights.aspx
...although that doesn't mention anything about the roasting.

EDIT: apparently there is some difference in the nutritional profile of English walnuts (the typical kind) and Black Walnuts (the kind the above oil is made with). Info is sparse, but this study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21488754
...does indicate enough of a difference to suggest we might consider avoiding black walnut oil until we can really know for sure what it might do in a paint film, IMHO. It may be that black walnut oil will turn out to be better for washing brushes but I sure can't interpret anything one way or another from the article, while it's known that regular walnut oil is OK.