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AnnieA
03-18-2019, 04:26 PM
I have used the Cobra WMO paint Indian Yellow, which is fairly transparent. The color and transparency make it very useful for sunsets and for dulling dioxazine violet without making it much more opaque. The problem is that PY110 paints aren't generally available locally, which means I need to either have a large order or to pay a shipping charge, which I really just hate to do. I do have the M.Graham version which is more opaque than the Cobra, and a slightly different hue.

The Color of Art Pigment Database lists PY110 as ranging from 2 (semi-opaque) to 4 (transparent). I'd really prefer the transparent version (I think the Cobra paint is semi-transparent). http://www.artiscreation.com/yellow.html#PY110 Unfortunately, the database does not reveal which paints are more transparent.

Does anyone know of a readily available paint line (Gamblin, W&N, Rembrandt, etc.) that uses the transparent form of PY110?
TIA!

AnnieA
03-18-2019, 07:29 PM
OK, answering my own question here, Rembrandt Artist Oils offers a Stil de Gran Yellow that's PY110 and transparent. https://www.dickblick.com/items/00417-4933/
I suppose I should have realized that both Cobra WMOs and Rembrandt Artist oils are made by Royal Talens, so I should have started there. But anyway, I'm glad to have an option that I can buy off the shelf.

Pinguino
03-18-2019, 08:18 PM
Indeed, I have the Rembrandt "Stil de Grain" yellow, and it is a rather transparent version of PY110. Great for adding "sunset glow" to terrain, as a glaze.

I just wish the manufacturers would not come up with such imaginative names. Historical Stil de Grain was an entirely different (and fugitive) vegetable pigment.

In the future, try the Color of Art (http://www.artiscreation.com/) pigment database. If you already know a pigment number, you can look it up. Among the things you will learn is tha imaginative name given to it by various manufacturers. The list of manufacturers isn't comprehensive, but it is helpful.

AnnieA
03-19-2019, 02:41 AM
Indeed, I have the Rembrandt "Stil de Grain" yellow, and it is a rather transparent version of PY110. Great for adding "sunset glow" to terrain, as a glaze.

I just wish the manufacturers would not come up with such imaginative names. Historical Stil de Grain was an entirely different (and fugitive) vegetable pigment.

In the future, try the Color of Art (http://www.artiscreation.com/) pigment database. If you already know a pigment number, you can look it up. Among the things you will learn is tha imaginative name given to it by various manufacturers. The list of manufacturers isn't comprehensive, but it is helpful.
Oh yes, I use the CoA Database. But the problem is that it lists a range of transparencies for PY110. Clicking on specific msgs leads to the Blick site, but the info there doesn't always - and didn't in the case of the paints made of PY110 - offer transparency info. And the database doesn't always list all the available manufacturers of paints made with a specific pigment. Anyway, I just hoped someone would have a quick answer so I wouldn't have to try to search through all the mfg's color charts to find it.

Actually, it was an advantage to to the search, since it turns out that Talens also offers PY110 in their student line, Van Gogh. Since staining paints in student grade seem to work just fine imo, some money can be saved by using the Van Gogh offering instead of the artist grade paint, which costs twice as much. I do this for the pthalos and some other similar staining paints - there's really no need to purchase a artist grade paint with a much heavier pigment load when it's a staining pigment.

Manufacturers do seem to be getting better at naming - M.Graham and Gamblin seem to do a good job. But even "Indian Yellow" is a misnomer. We don't seek out the urine of cows fed exclusively on mango leaves for making oil paint anymore. :lol:

Pinguino
03-19-2019, 11:48 AM
... Talens also offers PY110 in their student line, Van Gogh. Since staining paints in student grade seem to work just fine imo, some money can be saved by using the Van Gogh offering instead of the artist grade paint.... But even "Indian Yellow" is a misnomer. We don't seek out the urine of cows fed exclusively on mango leaves for making oil paint anymore. Indeed, I wish that Blick mentioned the transparency rating of the paints. Can't be read from the image of the paint tube, since the code is usually on the back of the tube. However, I always go to the manufacturer's own site, which will tell me things that Blick doesn't say. Not only that, the color samples are often different!

The student-grade method is worth noting. So far, I've only done it for Dioxazine Purple. I can see it should also work for the Phthalos.

Did I mention that I make "Indian Yellow" from the urine of raccoons fed on Cheetos? I grind the dried urine in poppy oil from the nearby opium fields. :evil:

AnnieA
03-19-2019, 01:27 PM
Indeed, I wish that Blick mentioned the transparency rating of the paints. Can't be read from the image of the paint tube, since the code is usually on the back of the tube. However, I always go to the manufacturer's own site, which will tell me things that Blick doesn't say. Not only that, the color samples are often different!
Yes, I guess I was too focused on saving some time which is why I asked the question rather than searching through the mfgs' sites. Sorry. I was also looking for personal experience, which is so often useful in deciding between brands. For instance, although M.Graham makes a PY110 paint, it seems to be less transparent and not quite as rich and deep in hue as the Cobra version. The M.Graham is still a lovely paint, but for many things, especially skies, I prefer the Cobra version. I also want something closer to the Cobra version b/c using , using PY110 and Perylene Maroon, PR179 (and maybe something else?), I hope to create a slower-drying version of the hue of Raw Umber or something close to it. Raw Umber's too-quick drying and tendency to sink in are annoying traits.
The student-grade method is worth noting. So far, I've only done it for Dioxazine Purple. I can see it should also work for the Phthalos.
Good, I hope the idea will be helpful, and it certainly makes sense for Dioxazine Purple. One caution is that in the case of Pthalo Blue, there are several student grades that apparently use the red shade. It's often impossible to tell whether a paint is RS or GS because all that will be listed on the label and in color charts is PB15 (Blick Student grade paint does this). The red shade isn't generally what artists want or expect in a Pthalo Blue. Daler-Rowney Georgian Pthalo Blue is an exception, listed in the color chart as PB15:3, which is the green shade of Pthalo Blue (passing the info on to you although I haven't tried it yet).
Did I mention that I make "Indian Yellow" from the urine of raccoons fed on Cheetos? I grind the dried urine in poppy oil from the nearby opium fields.
Too funny! :lol: