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Raffless
03-07-2019, 08:02 AM
Hi gang
I need a few ideas for making an inky runny type of oil paint. The catch is i want it solvent free. Probably too much of an ask. I have considered Gamsol if not possible. It has to have a bit of body and lustre so maybe Gamsol and linseed. Cant think of anything else. Im going to be putting the paint on with 'rollers'. Hence the question for this. Thanks for any ideas. :wave:

ronsu18
03-07-2019, 08:10 AM
linseed+solvent? de Kooning style.

stapeliad
03-07-2019, 08:16 AM
Gamsol + oil is your best bet.

Raffless
03-07-2019, 11:08 AM
Thanks guys.I think ill go with the Gamsol and linseed. Should be fun!👯👯 Bring on the dancing girls!

contumacious
03-07-2019, 12:05 PM
I will second the use of Gamsol as the least irritating of the solvents I have used.
I wonder if Gamblin's Solvent Free Fluid might do the job for you without using solvents or perhaps less solvent. It is supposed to be very thin but I have never used it.

Raffless
03-07-2019, 12:24 PM
I will second the use of Gamsol as the least irritating of the solvents I have used.
I wonder if Gamblin's Solvent Free Fluid might do the job for you without using solvents or perhaps less solvent. It is supposed to be very thin but I have never used it.

Its quite a large painting Contu. 36x36 inches. The Gamblin fluid maybe too expensive. Wheras the Gamsol is reasonably cheap. I wish i could use Liquin tbh. Thinned down. But im worried it will be too toxic all round. :evil:

Richard P
03-07-2019, 12:40 PM
A WMO oil paint mixed with walnut oil and water?

stapeliad
03-07-2019, 12:47 PM
Its quite a large painting Contu. 36x36 inches. The Gamblin fluid maybe too expensive. Wheras the Gamsol is reasonably cheap. I wish i could use Liquin tbh. Thinned down. But im worried it will be too toxic all round. :evil:

Liquin fine detail is a very loose medium and will probably give you the consistency you need.

Gamblin likely has some kind of Galkyd equivalent, and you could certainly use that instead of oil, mixed with Gamsol.

Galkyd has noticeably less odor than liquin.

You might also do something like 1/4 galkyd (lite?) 1/4 oil 1/2 gamsol.

RomanB
03-07-2019, 12:48 PM
Without solvents? You could use reactive diluents instead. Methyl or ethyl esters of linoleic or linolenic acids could help lower paint viscosity. I think even biodiesel made entirely from linseed oil could work too.

Dcam
03-07-2019, 01:22 PM
Oils need to catch up to fluid and High Flow acrylics and acrylic inks which flow beautifully, yet are intense. Invent something solvent free and make big bucks.
Good luck on your venture Raff.

Raffless
03-07-2019, 01:22 PM
Liquin fine detail is a very loose medium and will probably give you the consistency you need.

Gamblin likely has some kind of Galkyd equivalent, and you could certainly use that instead of oil, mixed with Gamsol.

Galkyd has noticeably less odor than liquin.

You might also do something like 1/4 galkyd (lite?) 1/4 oil 1/2 gamsol.

Thanks Stapeliad. The liquin fine detail look about the perfect consistency i need. Galkyd lite and Gamsol would go a lot further. Perhaps i could use that outside. I need to get liberal amounts of runny paint. It need a bit of tack and gloss too. The Liquin fine detail maybe the overall winner .👍

Raffless
03-07-2019, 01:24 PM
Oils need to catch up to fluid and High Flow acrylics and acrylic inks which flow beautifully, yet are intense. Invent something solvent free and make big bucks.
Good luck on your venture Raff.

Thanks Derek. Yes i agree. Ive seen a Liquitex flow product that would be ideal in oils. :envy:

Raffless
03-07-2019, 01:43 PM
A WMO oil paint mixed with walnut oil and water?

The rollers may struggle to pick up the paint with water Richard?.Not sure. I need a bit of tack on the contact points.

stapeliad
03-07-2019, 02:06 PM
I had another thought....
You could also try oil-based block printing ink with the roller. It comes in tubes like paint tubes, and is paint consistency, maybe even thicker iirc.

If you are dripping paint then the inky consistency would work well... but if you are wanting to apply with a roller (are you using a brayer?) I don't think you need the paint that thin. If you have done linocut prints you'll know what I'm talking about... just something to consider.

Gamblin makes a tack reducer which is just fumed silica and linseed oil, it is also a great oil paint gel medium (like oleogel).

Richard P
03-07-2019, 02:10 PM
Just a little water added still makes it oily. It's only when you add a lot of water it becomes more like an watered down acrylic. Maybe worth a test if nothing else works out well?

Raffless
03-07-2019, 02:42 PM
I had another thought....
You could also try oil-based block printing ink with the roller. It comes in tubes like paint tubes, and is paint consistency, maybe even thicker iirc.

If you are dripping paint then the inky consistency would work well... but if you are wanting to apply with a roller (are you using a brayer?) I don't think you need the paint that thin. If you have done linocut prints you'll know what I'm talking about... just something to consider.

Gamblin makes a tack reducer which is just fumed silica and linseed oil, it is also a great oil paint gel medium (like oleogel).

Thats a great suggestion. Oily ink. Yes im using several Brayers different sizes. Would the ink work on cotton canvas?

Raffless
03-07-2019, 02:44 PM
Just a little water added still makes it oily. It's only when you add a lot of water it becomes more like an watered down acrylic. Maybe worth a test if nothing else works out well?

Could be worth a shot Richard. Cheers for the idea if the fumes are too much.

stapeliad
03-07-2019, 03:05 PM
Thats a great suggestion. Oily ink. Yes im using several Brayers different sizes. Would the ink work on cotton canvas?

I don't see why not... test it out and see what happens. but you might want to lay it out and roll it first on a glass plate, like you would before applying to linoleum. This way it will apply to the canvas in an even film.

If you use the ink you might not need solvent or medium at all for anything except cleaning up. The ink is formulated to be rolled out and applied.

You could get the cool color gradations this way as well.

I would be very interested to see pictures of whatever process you come up with.

Raffless
03-07-2019, 03:09 PM
I don't see why not... test it out and see what happens. but you might want to lay it out and roll it first on a glass plate, like you would before applying to linoleum. This way it will apply to the canvas in an even film.

You could get the cool color gradations this way as well.

I would be very interested to see pictures of whatever process you come up with.

Cheers. I will try it out as you say. If i take a few pics as i go along they maybe worth showing. Its going to be a disaster or a triumph. Im hoping the latter :)

stapeliad
03-07-2019, 03:14 PM
Well whichever way, you will have gotten to roll the ink on glass with a brayer, which is VERY fun to do, and it makes a nice sound.

Oil-ink is stickier than oil paint and it covers very well. Try them both and see what works best.

:)

Keep us posted.

stapeliad
03-07-2019, 07:57 PM
As it turns out, I actually know where my ancient brayer is and I have an equally ancient (but brand new!) unopened tube of white block printing ink. I also have a stack of cheapo canvases that a friend toned and gave to me, and I have been meaning to paint white over them.

You don't even need the glass, just put the ink right on the canvas and roll away. It's a little tough when you go over the stretcher bars but still do-able.
It works beautifully. I will say however that it does take a lot more physical exertion than using a brush but the results are excellent.