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Donny Seib
02-20-2019, 10:42 PM
Hi! I have been considering picking up a full set of alkyds to use for under painting. Now I either use acrylics or a very lean oil maybe with some liquin to speed it up. Also....not sure if I would do this but, can alkyds be used with linseed based oil paints?
Thanks
Donny

Gigalot
02-21-2019, 03:20 AM
I think, that alkyds have no advantages over linseed oil paints, while rheology of regular oil paint is much better over alkyds. I guess, the optimal combination of paints are acrylic-oil or oil-oil except, probably, some abstract styles. I used alkyds a lot, but I can consider, that alkyds are not as effective as you want to have. For me, the best usage for alkyds are oiling out using 50% Gamsol + 50% Galkyd.

contumacious
02-21-2019, 08:23 AM
Hi! I have been considering picking up a full set of alkyds to use for under painting. Now I either use acrylics or a very lean oil maybe with some liquin to speed it up. Also....not sure if I would do this but, can alkyds be used with linseed based oil paints?
Thanks
Donny

As you probably already know, Liquin is an alkyd medium. Adding that to your regular oil paints basically turns them into Alkyd oil paints, similar to what you would buy that is labeled as Alkyd paint. Alkyd mediums and resins are fully compatible with regular oils. Though I have never tried WMOs, they are also supposed to be compatible with regular oils and alkyds, though you may lose some of the water miscible properties if you add too much Alkyd or regular oils to them.

Unless you want to use the Alkyd oils straight from the tube with no thinning, or desire the matte sheen that Gamblin Alkyds provide, you don't need to buy a set of Alkyd paints. Just add your Liquin or some other Alkyd medium to them when you want the faster drying time. There are several varieties of Alkyd mediums out there to try Impasto pastes, gels, Maroger like mediums, solvent free mediums and more. That is the route I have chosen which reduces the number of various tubes of paint I need on hand. It has worked well for me.

DAK723
02-21-2019, 08:27 AM
Yes, Alkyds can be used with traditional oils. Gamblin came out with their FastMatte Alkyd Oil Colors for that purpose - to be used for underpaintings.

Don

Pinguino
02-21-2019, 02:35 PM
AFAIK Alkyd paints (and mediums) dry faster, but not just because of the Alkyd.

Alkyd paints often have some built-in solvent, which evaporates quickly, so that the paint appears to be drying faster than it really is. But the paint film is not cured. The paint cannot be blended, but it can be smeared if you paint above it too quickly.

Alkyd paints usually also have some amount of "regular" oil, not just pure Alkyd. To speed the drying (curing) time, there may be some siccative built into the paint. But you can achieve this yourself, by manually adding siccative to ordinary oil paint.

When I first decided to get into painting, now about three years ago, I tried various things, including W&N's Griffin Alkyds. Didn't like them, because they became unworkable on the palette quickly, and also made it necessary to clean the brushes quickly. I'm not a quick alla prima type!

Instead, I found it better to do an underlayer using ordinary oil paint, with some siccative added. I use CoZiCa for that purpose. Can also add a touch of medium or OMS if necessary (depends on the original paint viscosity).

Or, you can use FastMatte or similar stuff that is specifically intended for underpainting. I tried it, and it worked OK, but the increased "tooth" was not such an advantage that it was necessary. I paint on board, not flexible canvas, to toothiness is less of an issue for me.

Given a choice between adding siccative and using an Alkyd medium to speed drying, I much prefer siccative.

Donny Seib
03-26-2019, 12:25 AM
Thanks y'all! I guess I'll just stick to using my liquin. Don't need to start buying another type of paint to do what I'm already doing.