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axel9546
02-20-2019, 12:22 AM
Hey guys, does after using oil paint or have a studio with tons of paints, mediums and other stuff, could be fire in the summer when its 40 celsius?
At what should i be more carefull?

contumacious
02-20-2019, 09:41 AM
The only real fire risks at 40C/104F in your studio are solvents next to an open flame plus rags soaked in drying oils such as linseed, walnut and such. Keep open flames away from them, don't smoke while using them and keep your oil soaked rags in a container full of water and you should be good to go. Oil paint, canvas, wood frames & easels, chairs and even your brushes are COMBUSTIBLE but not FLAMMABLE. They can burn if you put a fire underneath them for quite a while, but they aren't going to catch fire by touching a match to them or spontaneously while sitting in the tubes or on your palette. Solvents stored in your studio or home will certainly accelerate a fire if they become engulfed in flames and the containers burst, so you may not want to store too much of it in your studio. Keep just the amount you need on hand to use in your daily work. If you have gallons of the stuff, an outdoor storage shed is better than in your studio. For an even greater margin of safety, keep the flammable liquids in a metal fire resistant cabinet. I have several gallons of solvents on hand and keep most of them in the garage next to an outer wall in a fire resistant cabinet.

The most flammable materials I have in my studio, listed from most flammable to least, actually tested by pouring into a small open dish and trying to ignite them:


Alcohol - easily ignited with a match - producing very small flames, even easier with a propane torch, producing much larger flames
Turpentine - unable to light with a match - fairly easy to ignite with a propane torch - produces fairly large flames on its own.
Oil of Spike - could not ignite with a match, could ignite with a propane torch, fairly low volume of flames.
Kleanstrip OMS - could not ignite with a match, would ignite with a torch but only if the flame was held on the surface of the liquid for about a second, causing to to give off more fumes
Gamsol OMS - could not ignite with a match, less easily ignited with a torch than the Kleanstrip OMS, smaller volume of flames. This is the least flammable solvent I keep in my studio plus it is the least toxic / irritating fume wise of everything above other than the alcohol.


Note that all of the above solvents are significantly easier to ignite if they are saturating some kind of a wick, like a soaked rag or paper towel. Oils can also be ignited fairly easily if in a wicking material, an example being oil lamps of old.

Don't take my amateur advice when it comes to flammable stuff. Consult a professional pyromaniac.

axel9546
02-20-2019, 01:11 PM
Thanks so much. I dont smoke or pratice any fire but could the hot summer sun rays caught by the windows, cause the fire?

contumacious
02-20-2019, 02:32 PM
Highly unlikely unless you had some kind of light ray focusing lens or similar item between the sun and your painting materials.

The Auto-Ignition (bursting into flames without an external flame being applied) temperature for linseed oil is 343C (649.4F) the Flash Point (giving off fumes to the point where you could light them with a match) is 222.22C (432F). Other oils used in oil painting are similar.

The auto ignition temperature of most mineral spirits is around 347.8C / 658.04F.

axel9546
02-21-2019, 02:36 AM
Highly unlikely unless you had some kind of light ray focusing lens or similar item between the sun and your painting materials.

The Auto-Ignition (bursting into flames without an external flame being applied) temperature for linseed oil is 343C (649.4F) the Flash Point (giving off fumes to the point where you could light them with a match) is 222.22C (432F). Other oils used in oil painting are similar.

The auto ignition temperature of most mineral spirits is around 347.8C / 658.04F.
Oh thanks for those infos :)

contumacious
02-21-2019, 07:54 AM
You are welcome.

Ted Bunker
02-26-2019, 08:22 AM
That bottle of water you leave in your car's console cupholder is probably more dangereous. I've read of car fires caused by the Sun being magnified on a hot day. ...Keep your paper reciepts in one cupholder snd the Poland Park water in the other? How hot is your dash after a Summer's day in the parking lot sitting in the Sun. Ever leave a bottle on your dashboard, or the back window shelf?
...Or a half-used bottle laying on your passenger sest on top of something flammable?

stapeliad
02-26-2019, 09:25 AM
YES there is a fire risk associated with oils and it is NOT the solvent. It is the oil. Please read this thread (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=605220) in the main oils forum FAQ..

contumacious
02-26-2019, 09:55 AM
YES there is a fire risk associated with oils and it is NOT the solvent. It is the oil. Please read this thread (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=605220) in the main oils forum FAQ..

Your statement is not correct RE: Solvents not being a fire risk. There is a significantly greater risk and ease of setting a solvent soaked rag on fire while using it than setting fire to a freshly oil soaked rag in use, if there is a spark or open flame near it. Also, if you store large amounts of solvents in your studio and your studio catches fire somehow, they are going to greatly intensify the fire if they become involved where as the oils are not nearly as much of an accelerant. I am far more concerned with the fire danger of solvents in my studio than I am with oil soaked rags because I use a fire proof container for my rags. I keep a fire extinguisher nearby, not for oil soaked rag fires, but for solvent fires. In 50 years of painting I have never had an oil soaked rag catch fire or even start to smoke as they are properly stored, but I have had a few solvent soaked rags ignite during certain processes because I work with torches and heat guns. Granted, for most artists who never smoke or use torches in their work, the flame risk from solvents in a rag is very unlikely. As long as one is aware and prepared for preventing the fire risks from both solvents AND drying oils in rags in their studio, they shouldn't be a problem. I would guess that flames from oil soaked rags drying happens way more often in art studios than do fires from solvent related stuff, but both materials present real risks that should not be taken lightly.

stapeliad
02-26-2019, 09:55 AM
Obviously solvents are flammable but the spontaneous combustion danger is more from the oil and heat getting trapped in oily rags etc.

Ted Bunker
02-27-2019, 11:38 PM
🎶 "I don't want to set the World on fire,
...I just want to put a flame in your trash." 🎵

TomM1
02-28-2019, 12:39 AM
This reminds me of how the Blue Ridge oil paint shop burned down because of oily rags.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1387849

axel9546
03-01-2019, 05:16 PM
I will paint with safflowe, or walnut oil and leave the brushes full of paint submerged by one of thoose in a plastic container ready for the next day pauinting session. I will use paper towels to clean it, and baby cleaning towels wet to clean the palette. To prevent any flame where should i trhrow the towels full of paint/medium?

Delofasht
03-01-2019, 06:01 PM
Axel, I suggest using the method described by a couple others in this thread:

How long do oily rags remain a fire risk? (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?p=21554828#post21554828)

Lay or hang towels flat rather than bunched up in a heap, allow to dry to the touch, then dispose normally; except, if particularly toxic pigments are used like lead, then dispose of those in a manner respecting your country/state/county/regional codes.

Pinguino
04-15-2019, 06:46 PM
As they are saying in Paris:

OUI!:crying: