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View Full Version : Oil painting best team for non toxicity


axel9546
02-14-2019, 04:59 AM
Hi guys!
Could u help me build up a team for oil paint to paint with no toxicity and smells? I would need
- Colors
- Medium
- Thinner
- Cleaner

Thanks :)

Ps ive just saw this video about cleaning is true to use olive oil to clean brushes? https://youtu.be/jrBRFYF3AF8

Raffless
02-14-2019, 05:45 AM
Hi Axel.
Your going to get a lot of opinions on this so i 'll wait. Just be open minded.

axel9546
02-14-2019, 07:08 AM
Hi Axel.
Your going to get a lot of opinions on this so i 'll wait. Just be open minded.
Thanks i will :)

Dcam
02-14-2019, 07:55 AM
Hi Alex......maybe put this in the tech forum please?

axel9546
02-14-2019, 08:44 AM
Hi Alex......maybe put this in the tech forum please?
Oh okay! How could i do?

Delofasht
02-14-2019, 10:46 AM
Make a new thread in that subforum with the same title, I will respond there when it's up and I am back at my keyboard.

axel9546
02-14-2019, 04:46 PM
Hi guys!
Could u help me build up a team for oil paint to paint with no toxicity and smells? I would need
- Colors
- Medium
- Thinner
- Cleaner

Thanks

Ps ive just saw this video about cleaning is true to use olive oil to clean brushes? https://youtu.be/jrBRFYF3AF8

axel9546
02-14-2019, 04:46 PM
Make a new thread in that subforum with the same title, I will respond there when it's up and I am back at my keyboard.
Done it thanks!!

RomanB
02-14-2019, 05:26 PM
Pigments toxicity data could be found on manufacturer's sites, they should include MSDS for their paints. Not everything is well-studied, but it will help you avoid most obvious toxic pigments.

Medium and thinner - use only pure drying oil, linseed, walnut or poppy. There are no non-toxic volatile solvents. Relatively less toxic option is to use reactive diluents like esters of unsaturated fatty acids - they do not evaporate from paint and significantly reduce its viscosity, practically they are a kind of biodiesel fuels. But they are still not well studied and few painters use them.

Cleaner - use drying oil like walnut and soap. Do not apply non-drying oils to your brushes, there is no way to clean them out completely without solvents and it will make your paints unstable.

Delofasht
02-14-2019, 05:34 PM
The colors are much your choice, but my personal favorites are:

PY110 Indian Yellow
PY129 Azo Green
PY184 Bismuth Yellow
PR101 Transparent Red Oxide
PR254 Pyrrole Red
PV19 Quinacridone Rose
PB27 Prussian Blue
PB60 Anthraquinone Blue
PW6/4 Titanium White

For Medium:

Just oil (I like walnut oil, it's nice and slippery) or oil mixed with calcium carbonate (or fumed silica).

Thinner:

Just oil

Cleaner:

Oil followed by soap and water.

For the last 2 you can see my video on how I Rinse the Brush with Oil (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FEs3hDYcmw). After doing that I just wash the brush with soap and water.

In the studio I keep my brushes suspended in oil as shown here but without ever washing with soap and water. Years of suspension in oil for several of my brushes:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Feb-2019/34519-IMG_0158.jpg

I have actually cleaned both my jar and my oil since that picture:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Feb-2019/34519-IMG_0792.JPG

Notes: Oil works to thin the paint to the desired consistency, do not use tons... Oil paint shouldn't ever be watery thin (or in this case purely oil thin). Oil can work as the only medium in layered or alla prima paintings, when working in a layered approach be sure to either allow the painting to dry well between layers (keeping each layer thin), or add a little oil to the top most layer of paint and keep layers about the same thickness overall. Generally speaking glazing over thicker passages of paint will cause more likelihood for cracking after some number of years (if longevity of the artwork is a concern).

Walnut oil dries a bit slower than Linseed oil, both in the paints and as a medium used for thinning the paint to the appropriate consistency. Anything used to adjust your paints should be used sparingly for the most part (I break my own rules when using my extender... it doesn't thin the paint just changes the ratio and types of solids).

My extender is the same stuff I use for my medium, oil mixed with calcium carbonate. I get the calcium carbonate in the form of Marble Dust, bagged and sold by Fredrix (the manufacturer of good canvases and other painting surfaces). A 4lb bag costs less than 10$ US and it lasts for ages, making my extender is just a matter of mixing the two together, tiny drops added to a pile of marble dust and worked together with the palette knife. I will make a video on this at some point. I use it in a variety of ways, just using oil is also a standard for me as medium or thinner.

Regarding Olive Oil for cleaning brushes: Yes you can use it, but be sure to thoroughly rinse it out of the bristles and allow to dry before using paint with it. You do not want large amounts of Olive oil in your paint, it will take ages to dry and may compromise the integrity of the paint film once dried. I personally feel my method for rinsing a brush to be better and keeps the oil cleaner and wastes less over time. Also, by using Walnut oil for rinsing the brush you do not have to concern yourself as much with the paint film not drying properly.

This about sums up painting solvent free. There are other ways to work as well, the paints I use are either M Graham or ArtTreehouse paints, both made with walnut oil. They are very smooth paints and handle beautifully together, I find them exceptionally pigmented and worth every penny.

Delofasht
02-14-2019, 05:45 PM
For an extended palette of colors:

PG17 Chromium Oxide Green
PO73 Scarlet Pyrrole
PV23 Dioxazine Purple
PO62 Azo Orange
PBr24 Chrome Tin Yellow
PY42 Yellow Ochre
PY42 Transparent Yellow Oxide
PR101 Terra Rosa
PBk11 Mars Black

These are my extended fun colors that I like to bring in for various different purposes, but the core of my colors were listed in my main post.

If I had to only have 5 colors, they would be:

PY110 Indian Yellow
PY129 Azo Green
PR101 Transparent Red Oxide
PV19 Quinacridone Rose
PB27 Prussian Blue

and White, 5 colors and one non color. Black can be mixed by just adding transparent pigments together. Greens of huge varieties can be created by mixing Prussian with the Red, yellow, or "green", Quinacridone Rose allows modification of colors and creation of violets with prussian blue. This is one of the small palettes I like using for initial color works and with lots of white then glazing to get the colors I am after. Transparent paints can be glazed over lighter (heavy white usage) colors to create very vibrant colors.

axel9546
02-15-2019, 01:52 AM
The colors are much your choice, but my personal favorites are:

PY110 Indian Yellow
PY129 Azo Green
PY184 Bismuth Yellow
PR101 Transparent Red Oxide
PR254 Pyrrole Red
PV19 Quinacridone Rose
PB27 Prussian Blue
PB60 Anthraquinone Blue
PW6/4 Titanium White

For Medium:

Just oil (I like walnut oil, it's nice and slippery) or oil mixed with calcium carbonate (or fumed silica).

Thinner:

Just oil

Cleaner:

Oil followed by soap and water.

For the last 2 you can see my video on how I Rinse the Brush with Oil (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FEs3hDYcmw). After doing that I just wash the brush with soap and water.

In the studio I keep my brushes suspended in oil as shown here but without ever washing with soap and water. Years of suspension in oil for several of my brushes:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Feb-2019/34519-IMG_0158.jpg

I have actually cleaned both my jar and my oil since that picture:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Feb-2019/34519-IMG_0792.JPG

Notes: Oil works to thin the paint to the desired consistency, do not use tons... Oil paint shouldn't ever be watery thin (or in this case purely oil thin). Oil can work as the only medium in layered or alla prima paintings, when working in a layered approach be sure to either allow the painting to dry well between layers (keeping each layer thin), or add a little oil to the top most layer of paint and keep layers about the same thickness overall. Generally speaking glazing over thicker passages of paint will cause more likelihood for cracking after some number of years (if longevity of the artwork is a concern).

Walnut oil dries a bit slower than Linseed oil, both in the paints and as a medium used for thinning the paint to the appropriate consistency. Anything used to adjust your paints should be used sparingly for the most part (I break my own rules when using my extender... it doesn't thin the paint just changes the ratio and types of solids).

My extender is the same stuff I use for my medium, oil mixed with calcium carbonate. I get the calcium carbonate in the form of Marble Dust, bagged and sold by Fredrix (the manufacturer of good canvases and other painting surfaces). A 4lb bag costs less than 10$ US and it lasts for ages, making my extender is just a matter of mixing the two together, tiny drops added to a pile of marble dust and worked together with the palette knife. I will make a video on this at some point. I use it in a variety of ways, just using oil is also a standard for me as medium or thinner.

Regarding Olive Oil for cleaning brushes: Yes you can use it, but be sure to thoroughly rinse it out of the bristles and allow to dry before using paint with it. You do not want large amounts of Olive oil in your paint, it will take ages to dry and may compromise the integrity of the paint film once dried. I personally feel my method for rinsing a brush to be better and keeps the oil cleaner and wastes less over time. Also, by using Walnut oil for rinsing the brush you do not have to concern yourself as much with the paint film not drying properly.

This about sums up painting solvent free. There are other ways to work as well, the paints I use are either M Graham or ArtTreehouse paints, both made with walnut oil. They are very smooth paints and handle beautifully together, I find them exceptionally pigmented and worth every penny.
Thanks you so much guys ive read all !
So basically the medium should be just oil! So for have a clear vision, now i have Winsor e Newton watermixable Walnut Oil and Linseed Oil. The smell of linseed oil is gave me crazy, for me is too much! As thoose are watermixable, do you know a good brand i can pick up for traditional oil painting? Also a good brand of traditional oil paint that will containt only Pigment and Oil, no additional vapour or toxic stuff? Also if you tried and the smell was in odor good also!
Thoose are tye links the medium i used
https://www.jacksonsart.com/winsor-newton-artisan-75ml-fast-drying-medium
---
https://www.jacksonsart.com/winsor-newton-artisan-75ml-linseed-oil (idk if linseed oil smell like this, but this one is terrible for smell!!)
--
https://www.jacksonsart.com/winsor-newton-artisan-75ml-safflower-oil (still have to try)
--
https://www.jacksonsart.com/winsor-newton-artisan-75ml-thinner (tried but bad smell)
--
Paints i use are Cobra Watermixable Oil Paints, ive started with thoose. The smell is bad for me!
So i want to switch to a non toxic oil paint set up :)

Richard P
02-15-2019, 05:19 AM
If linseed oil is too strong, then I'd suggest walnut or poppy which seem to have less of a smell to me.

axel9546
02-15-2019, 08:42 AM
If linseed oil is too strong, then I'd suggest walnut or poppy which seem to have less of a smell to me.
I have safllower, which is less smelly between walnut and poppy? Thanks

axel9546
03-05-2019, 08:18 AM
Today poppyseed and walnut oils medium just arrived. As first impression walnut has just a smelly, poppyseed instead is really no smelly and neutral. I will use and see which one i will like the more, and see if any i have problem with!

Gigalot
03-06-2019, 03:49 AM
PY129 is toxic as it contains Nickel. Nickel is well known irritant and can cause dermatites.

Delofasht
03-06-2019, 07:27 AM
PY129 is toxic as it contains Nickel. Nickel is well known irritant and can cause dermatites.

We should not start down that line, everything is toxic in the right amounts, and the body becomes allergic to anything that it is inappropriately overexposed to. General rules of proper painting always apply: do not put your paint on bread and eat it, or spread it on your skin as sunscreen, or put your fingers in it without gloves on if you can help it. The idea that everyone is a 5 year old who cannot keep paint from getting everywhere really should stop, almost everyone in this part of the forum is probably an adult who knows how to handle potentially dangerous materials. If someone doesn’t know, there is plenty of resources available on how to handle potentially dangerous substances.

Just to be clear though PY129 is NOT considered toxic, the only warning it sometimes carry is not to inhale or ingest (due to the Copper content actually). In order for nickel to be a problem the percentage of the compound has to exceed a certain threshold, otherwise it falls below the necessary exposure range unless one is hyper sensitized to it.

Delofasht
03-06-2019, 07:32 AM
I like the smell of walnut oil, but really have to put it right under my nose to really catch a scent, my painting is never that close to my face. It has extremely low release of any kind of fragrance, even in the heat of summer in an enclosed place, but if you like Poppy better then go for it. Different people have different responses to some smells than others, or are straight up more sensitive to some smells.

ik345
03-06-2019, 02:00 PM
You can check the manufacturer Web sites for safety data sheets. I checked those for the paints I use, Daler-Rowney Georgian and Lukas Berlin, both water mixable. Compared to traditional paint of the same manufacturer, they do not contain white spirit or any solvents. And only a half of any volatile compounds in general. There is still smell of course.

And if you are really allergic or something, you can use only water to thin the paint, and soap for cleaning up. But I noticed that not all paints are easily thinned with water. Daler-Rowney primary blue and Lukas burned umbra are the worst - all I get is sticky flakes.