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Pravda
01-15-2019, 01:28 AM
Good evening!
I currently use Copic multilier sp (fineliner). However,
It takes 3 nibs (Felt tip) including an ink refill a week.
I have decided to change because this is cannot stand.
I have found Rotring's Rapidograph or Isograph as an economical solution.

The pen has a needle and I wonder how it is in comparison with a felt tip.
Is it possible to draw with vertically? (up straight. I draw that way).
Is it just as good at drawing straight lines as a fine liner?

Anybody have experience with this?

markhwebster
01-15-2019, 03:19 AM
I recently upgraded from the well known Pigma Micron pens. The Pigmas have a felt tip similar to the Copic, but they wear down quickly.

I bought a set of the Rotring Isograph pens: 0.1 up to 0.8. They are wonderful pens, far better than any felt tip pen.

Yes, you can draw with them straight up, and they also draw straight lines just fine. You can also draw artistically at an angle, though if you tilt the pen too much the interior needle won't move...and then it will stop drawing. But this has never been a problem for me.

As an alternative to the Isographs, which are $27 each pen, I've had great success with the Pentel Hybrid Techica ballpoints. They are archival and come in the same widths. They draw beautifully and last a long time...and they are only $3 each.

pedlars pen
01-15-2019, 05:14 AM
Good evening!
I currently use Copic multilier sp (fineliner). However,
It takes 3 nibs (Felt tip) including an ink refill a week.
I have decided to change because this is cannot stand.
I have found Rotring's Rapidograph or Isograph as an economical solution.

The pen has a needle and I wonder how it is in comparison with a felt tip.
Is it possible to draw with vertically? (up straight. I draw that way).
Is it just as good at drawing straight lines as a fine liner?

Anybody have experience with this?
Hi Pravda, welcome ! here's the lowdown on these pens - Rotring's Rapidograph or Isograph work by having a very thin metal tube with a even finer needle like wire inside that tube.
These technical pens will give you a line of a very constant thickness without any variation,when using the ink that is made specifically for them the line they leave is wetter, darker & sharper than the copic multiliner. They are a very delicate pen & prone to clog up & die especially in their smaller sizes(0.25 & below).
Perhaps the biggest difference is in the feel of them when you use them, they have more of a dragging sensation & fell scratchy -hard Bristol board is a must have in terms of paper.
Out of all pens these technical pens demand that they are used in a vertical manner.
If you use 3 tips a week on the Copic multilier sp :eek: , you must have a VERY heavy drawing hand ! By the way the SP's actually have a thin nylon needle within a tube & the term "fineliners" usually refers to micro felt tips like the micron etc.
Altogether I would say that although the Rotrings look like an economical solution they might not last as long as you might wish because of their contrary & fickle nature but there again 3 tips & a ink too for the copic per week :eek: It may well pay you to try a rotring.
Mike

blackandwhite
01-15-2019, 05:21 AM
Technical pens work only in the straight vertical position. Thin nibs can be tilted slightly, but wider nibs (above 1mm or so) have to be exactly vertical to produce even line.

With felt tips you can slightly vary the line width and darkness by varying the speed and pressure. With technical pens this is much more limited and the lines are the same regardless of the pressure and speed.

The biggest limitation is that the technical pen inks are not fully waterproof, which may cause challenges with some drawing styles (watercolor wash over ink drawing etc.). Some inks work better than others, but none are fully waterproof.

The Rotring pens are also available in three pen sets that usually costs about as much as two pens bought separately.

Pravda
01-15-2019, 10:13 AM
Thanks everyone for taking your time to clear this up, and the overall information!
I will buy one tomorrow and see if it is something to stick to!

Wasp2016
01-15-2019, 12:07 PM
At the moment I use the Uni Pin fineliners because they have a fine point down to 0.03mm. I would be interested to try some of these other pens for comparison.

DSPIT
01-15-2019, 12:17 PM
I used the rapidographs for years. I started as a technical drafter. I still keep and us them often. they are by far the better for drawing straight lines and they work much better vertical than any other way. seems to me itd be natural for you. The only thing id say in being aware is. although fairly ez to clean or fix, the very small ones, like say 3/0 and 4/0 clog very easy and are very hard to clean without ruining the pin inside the pen shaft. however an 1/0 all the way through say a number 4. kept up, can last a lifetime.

blackandwhite
01-15-2019, 03:00 PM
At the moment I use the Uni Pin fineliners because they have a fine point down to 0.03mm. I would be interested to try some of these other pens for comparison.

The 0.1 mm Rotring Isograph produces line that is almost identical to the 0.03 Uni Pin. I have both and just tested it. Rotring ink is darker than the Uni Pin black, so it looks darker but the width is pretty close the same.

I have frequent problems with the 0.03 Uni Pin nibs getting clogged, but so far the Rotring 0.1 mm has never had issues with same papers.

Note that the Uni Pin sizing is not millimeters. The numbers are some weird units from some historic non-metric times. The same applies to Pigma Microns and other fineliners. There are metric size charts in the internet and those might be necessary when searching for equivalent size technical pens.

Yntheng
01-24-2019, 12:18 AM
Hello, I'm new here and so I don't know how to start my own thread, and I just want to ask a question to y'all experienced artists.

My 0.05 Uni Pin fine-liner isn't writing anymore and I don't know why. It is highly unlikely that it's used up because it is still quite new. I used it yesterday over an acrylic paint and I suspect it would be that that caused the blockage, or maybe not. I'm not really sure. The acrylic paint was black, as well as the pen's tip, hence I cannot see the problem. add the fact that the tip is very small, then I have a big problem.

Do you have any idea how to revive my fine-liner? or what reasons could there be that it isn't writing anymore?

Thanks in advance!:)

blackandwhite
01-24-2019, 06:22 AM
Do you have any idea how to revive my fine-liner? or what reasons could there be that it isn't writing anymore?


The nib is probably clogged by the acrylic paint. The nib contains very tiny holes where the ink flows. The edges of those holes are quite sharp and can scratch stuff away from the paint surface, which then clogs the nib.

I would try to dissolve the paint by putting small amount of soda ash solution to the tip. For example, mix 1 part of soda ash to 10 parts of water, moisten a tissue paper using that solution and hold the pen tip on that paper. It should dissolve the paint in few minutes. Acetone can work faster, but may also damage the pen.

pedlars pen
01-25-2019, 06:57 AM
Hello, I'm new here and so I don't know how to start my own thread, and I just want to ask a question to y'all experienced artists.

My 0.05 Uni Pin fine-liner isn't writing anymore and I don't know why. It is highly unlikely that it's used up because it is still quite new. I used it yesterday over an acrylic paint and I suspect it would be that that caused the blockage, or maybe not. I'm not really sure. The acrylic paint was black, as well as the pen's tip, hence I cannot see the problem. add the fact that the tip is very small, then I have a big problem.

Do you have any idea how to revive my fine-liner? or what reasons could there be that it isn't writing anymore?

Thanks in advance!:)
Yes the 0.05 size is very small & particularly prone to clogging in this manner but the truth is that any make or size of fine liner is prone to clogging & wearing out fast when you use it on any surface that is not pure clean smooth paper.If you try to draw on top of a painted surface this will happen,you need to use a different type of pen really.
Given that you find yourself in this situation now, I wipe the tip reasonably firmly on a cheap coarse piece of kitchen roll.Did that work ? No:crying: -then flick the pen as if you are trying to flick some ink out of the tip, this does force ink out of the tip so do it outside ! As soon as you see a drop of ink stop, clean the tip again & try it out.That should work but wastes ink, if it didn't work try it again but you may need a new pen.:crossfingers: good luck!
Mike

contumacious
01-27-2019, 10:40 PM
You might want to try a dip pen as well. I used technical pens for decades doing cartoon work with cross hatching mostly. I switched to dip pens plus some fountain pens a few years ago to get more line variation. I haven't gone back to my technical pens since. I use India and Dr Martin Bombay ink with the dip pens and Sailor carbon ink in the fountains.

I will admit that there was nothing quite as nice as a 6x0 technical pen for tiny and precise work, when it was flowing freely, but it rarely stayed that way for long.