PDA

View Full Version : Need help with damaged painting


Lpaint22
12-30-2018, 11:33 AM
I need help from all you tech geniuses. I received a painting back from a gallery that was damaged. The gallery is not answering my calls or email. It appears as a stress crack. It must have happened from pressure to the front of the canvas since I attach foam core to protect the back and the foam core was not damaged. A restorer came to my studio and basically said that the only thing that can be done is to sand the area and try to repaint. The problem is that I do not paint with any texture and you can still see the outline of the crack no matter how much I fill in and sand. I thought that I might just re stretch the painting onto smaller stretcher bars and crop out the affected area. Not the best solution but I believe the composition will still be OK. Here is the damage. My question is if I restretch, how hard will it be going smaller and not cracking the paint surface. It is oil and I use alkyd medium.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Dec-2018/1993424-IMG_1142.jpg

sidbledsoe
12-30-2018, 11:43 AM
If you can remove that foam core, then I would use PVA or Golden GAC to Glue a reinforcing strip in a rectangular shape, on the back of the canvas that covers and patches the damaged area. I would sandwich the back and front with pads that are clamped, or place books on both sides to weigh down enough to fully flatten the spot, while the glue is drying. Place waxed paper on both sides, larger than the area gluing, to prevent glue creep from sticking to the pads or books that are clamping it down.
Then I would fill any voids with paint, sand lightly til smooth, and repaint.

french.painter
12-30-2018, 12:01 PM
A restorer cannot do that because it modifies the materiality, but if it was my painting I would glue it on a dibond panel, and after drying, press it a few months. Then retouch lightly if needed.
And, of course, never let this galerist put his/her hands on my works.

sidbledsoe
12-30-2018, 12:06 PM
Here is an example of a large tear in a canvas that Termini restored with a patch on the back:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=119432
I fixed the tear by patching the painting from the reverse of the canvas. I used a pretty decent quality cotton duck, applied it with an acrylic glue, and wax paper, applied about 100lbs pressure

Raffless
12-30-2018, 12:25 PM
Its unfortunate the damage is in the worst place possible. Any repair will still have it a bit of the crease showing. I'd just move on as it looks like a piece you could reproduce quite easily. I like the composition btw.

sidbledsoe
12-30-2018, 12:58 PM
Isn't the photo of only a portion of the whole canvas?

contumacious
12-30-2018, 01:00 PM
That looks like something heavy was leaned on or was bumped against it. I am appalled at how poorly almost every gallery I deal with handles paintings when they are not on the wall. Most of them stack them against each other, leaning on a wall with NOTHING in between! Fortunately (I guess) they usually only damage the frames. Most of them clearly state in their contracts that the artist is responsible for any and all damage / theft etc. regardless of whether it was caused by gallery personnel, the public, natural disasters or bad people. If a painting was known to be damaged under their control, you might be able to win a judgment based on negligence against them in small claims court, despite such contracts. A court notice might wake them up.

Its unfortunate the damage is in the worst place possible. Any repair will still have it a bit of the crease showing. I'd just move on as it looks like a piece you could reproduce quite easily. I like the composition btw.

I agree with Raffless that it would be very difficult to hide the damage on a stretched canvas.

A restorer cannot do that because it modifies the materiality, but if it was my painting I would glue it on a dibond panel, and after drying, press it a few months. Then retouch lightly if needed.
And, of course, never let this galerist put his/her hands on my works.

This would be my vote as well to make the process easier as well as to protect it in the future. As you have learned, a rigid support that is not firmly attached to the canvas cannot protect it very well from front impact. FYI, I would probably repaint the entire sky section, not just the damaged area.

Mount the canvas to some ACM panel using Beva 371 and get the damaged area as flat as you can get it. Sand it down then fill it in with some alkyd "gesso" - alkyd medium with calcium carbonate added to it. Sand as needed when fully dry, repeat as necessary. Finer grit sandpaper is probably going to work the best for you - 400 or finer. You might want to add some mixed blue alkyd paint to the "gesso" as well to more closely match the sky colors or keep it translucent.

If the rest of the painting shows the canvas texture, once you get it covered and even, you may want to do a final, thin brushed on layer of the alkyd "gesso" that simulates the weave of the canvas, feathering it out into the untouched areas. A coarse bristle brush can do this with practice. Brush one layer left to right, let it dry then another one up and down to create a weave pattern. Then repaint either the fixed area or the entire sky, whichever works the best for you.

If you decide to try it, please take photos of the process and share them with us.

Raffless
12-30-2018, 01:54 PM
Isn't the photo of only a portion of the whole canvas?

Lol. So it is Sid. But what a great crop :)

Lpaint22
12-30-2018, 03:34 PM
Raffles, unfortunately, that is just a small section where the crack is the [painting is 42x42 and very involved. It is supposed to be in a museum show in the spring (although I can substitute with another work.). the deal is that the conservator thought it would be OK if I just sanded it lightly and filled the area and sanded again, but it is not. Everytime I repaint it you can see the lines. I think part of the issue is that I paint in layers and very smoothly and this is in a large flat area......also, I just think a stress crack can not be fixed. That is why I am asking about restretching and cutting off 3 inches of the painting on the right. Not a perfect solution but it might be the only way I can salvage it myself. I really don't have the money to get it expertly done, but maybe I will need to save up. Anyway, I am tempted to take sidbledsoe's advice but I am up in the air.

Here is the whole painting with the area gessoed and lightly sanded

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Dec-2018/1993424-IMG_1146.jpg

sidbledsoe
12-30-2018, 03:37 PM
very nice Edward Hopper feel to this plaintive piece!

But what a great crop wha? a severe crop that is turned sideways? yer diggin a deeper hole now ;)

anyway, here is what you would be left with if it is trimmed off:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Dec-2018/112587-1993424-IMG_1146.jpg

it is still a very strong piece, but if you take this option, then there would be nothing to lose by trying the splice and rework first, you could still trim it down.

Lpaint22
12-30-2018, 03:53 PM
Yes, that is what I thought Sidbledsoe. I was thinking of giving your suggestion a shot before altering the composition. I think the composition holds up with the crop but I think the original composition is stronger since it gives the angles more breathing room.

sidbledsoe
12-30-2018, 03:57 PM
Agree, best of luck!

Raffless
12-30-2018, 04:17 PM
very nice Edward Hopper feel to this plaintive piece!

wha? a severe crop that is turned sideways? yer diggin a deeper hole now ;)

anyway, here is what you would be left with if it is trimmed off:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Dec-2018/112587-1993424-IMG_1146.jpg

it is still a very strong piece, but if you take this option, then there would be nothing to lose by trying the splice and rework first, you could still trim it down.

Lol. Probably Sid.
Still a nice abstract though .Yes?:)

Raffless
12-30-2018, 04:20 PM
Raffles, unfortunately, that is just a small section where the crack is the [painting is 42x42 and very involved. It is supposed to be in a museum show in the spring (although I can substitute with another work.). the deal is that the conservator thought it would be OK if I just sanded it lightly and filled the area and sanded again, but it is not. Everytime I repaint it you can see the lines. I think part of the issue is that I paint in layers and very smoothly and this is in a large flat area......also, I just think a stress crack can not be fixed. That is why I am asking about restretching and cutting off 3 inches of the painting on the right. Not a perfect solution but it might be the only way I can salvage it myself. I really don't have the money to get it expertly done, but maybe I will need to save up. Anyway, I am tempted to take sidbledsoe's advice but I am up in the air.

Here is the whole painting with the area gessoed and lightly sanded

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Dec-2018/1993424-IMG_1146.jpg

In all its glory. Now i see why you dont want to reproduce it. Must have taken a long time. I agree but not Hopper. It looks more like a John Register to me as its more precise in execution. Like it!

Lpaint22
12-30-2018, 04:37 PM
Thank you Raffles.....yes, it takes me a long time to do ma painting.....unfortunately only a few seconds for someone to damage it.

WFMartin
12-30-2018, 05:41 PM
Mine is probably a simplistic solution to the sort of damage of which I know very little, but.......have you tried the very simple method of wetting the backside of the canvas with water, and allowing the affected area to dry, thus shrinking, and tightening the defect out of it?

Perhaps the damage (dent) is too extensive for that simple method to be successful. If there were no cracks in the paint, that might work, but if there are cracks in the actual paint, that may be too severe for a simple fabric-tightening to solve.

Using this method, I have pulled dents out of my canvases that were caused by objects being in contact with either the back, or the surface of them, but they had no cracks in the paint.

Hamburgefions
12-30-2018, 05:59 PM
Moistening the crack on the backside of the canvas (as to remove bumps) might have helped.

Lpaint22
12-30-2018, 06:13 PM
I did moisten the back a number of times and the line does not disappear. I was hoping that would be a solution but it was not. that method works wonders for dents, but once the surface is cracked because of stress it appears to effect the canvas to the root.

sidbledsoe
12-30-2018, 09:45 PM
Still a nice abstract though .Yes?
omg raff, now you thought it was an abstract,

I agree but not Hopper.
You may not even get feelings from paintings like I do, but
personally and speaking only for myself, it gave me that same type of plaintive "feeling" that I get from some of Hopper's work, for instance this one:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Dec-2018/112587-download.jpeg
and that mention from me is a major complement as I adore his work.

sidbledsoe
12-30-2018, 09:50 PM
once the surface is cracked because of stress it appears to effect the canvas to the root.
yes, the crack may extend through the ground too.

ppeace
01-07-2019, 03:14 PM
It's a really nice painting. What did you finally do?

I agree with cutting it off. It has a cropped feeling to begin with, no offense.

It looks too close to the beach. What's the title? Is this a series?

Lpaint22
01-08-2019, 01:36 PM
Hi ppeace
In the end, I had to cut down the canvas. I had 2 conservator's over and because I work very smoothly with hardly and texture, there was no way to totally obscure the damage. The good news is that it restretched beautifully and it looks perfect (although less about 4 inches to the right). The composition still holds together so I at least feel that the painting does keep most of it's integrity.

The title of the piece is "The Blue Door". It is not a series per se. This is the way I paint. I juxtapose very linear elements to give my pieces a certain feeling of mood or drama. I do both interiors and exteriors and each of the elements in the paintings come from real sources. However, I often combine elements from different scenes together, so in that way it is a made up reality. The constant for me is the light.

Jon Bradley
01-12-2019, 12:33 AM
If it were me, i'd either be re-stretching it and painting that part over, or prepping a piece of hardboard for the work to be glued to and then roll pressed with acylic medium.

Good luck with your operation.