PDA

View Full Version : Learning Pastels


anniecanjump
12-27-2018, 10:36 PM
Hi all, you may know me from the colored pencil forum. I have always worked in colored pencils but have often thought of trying pastels. I see some of the most amazing work done in pastels that I am now going to jump right in. I have a very old set of soft pastels and am presently drawing a cat but want to get more supplies. So the big question is what brands of soft pastels is the most lightfast, etc, and what are the best pastel pencils. I do not wish to spend a fortune just in case I decide that pastels are not for me. Thanking you in advance.

vhere
01-02-2019, 08:35 AM
Unison are my favourite

*Deirdre*
01-02-2019, 01:40 PM
Peggy, Have a look in Pastel talk, there are some polls that might help. You'll need a set of hard pastels for the basic drawing, and soft to add the finishing touches. Nupastels are good hard ones...soft ones depends what you can get in Canada, but I expect the major ones will be available.

anniecanjump
01-05-2019, 10:34 PM
Thanks everyone. I am hoping when I get my new supplies I will be able to make some nice pastel artwork.

RickinNM
01-06-2019, 08:49 PM
"So the big question is what brands of soft pastels is the most lightfast,"
Most Major brands show their lightfastness on their label or color a chart.

Equus Art
01-10-2019, 08:26 PM
Thanks everyone. I am hoping when I get my new supplies I will be able to make some nice pastel artwork.

I have no doubt that you will be able to master them as well as you do with your colored pencils!

Cat

PeggyB
01-12-2019, 09:52 PM
The brand, and degree of soft to hard is very personal. Personally, I dislike NuPastels despite their popularity among some other pastelists. They are too hard for my approach. I learned long ago to use a very light touch; its easier on the finger joints. lol My "hard" pastels are some Cretacolor and Caran d'Ache that are used mostly for fine details, and some old Rembrandt and Mungyo "extra soft" pastels (really not all that soft). My most used are a mix of (in alphabetical order) Blue Earth, Girault, hand rolled Mungyo (their softest more expense line), Sennelier, Schmencke, Terry Ludwig, and Unison. I love them all! One way to experience the different texture and degree of soft or hardness is to look at Dakota Pastel Art, and purchase one of their Pastel Sampler sets of mixed brands; they have a "soft" set, and a "medium/hard set". The brands included are listed on the website. They do ship to Canada. It's a bit pricey, but less than randomly buying different brands one at a time here and there. Or you might just look at what they include in the sets, and see if you can find those brands in your area, buy one of each knowing which "category" they will fill. Since pastels are usually worked dark to light, hard/medium to soft you might consider buying colors that fill that "requirement".

PeggyB
01-12-2019, 09:52 PM
The brand, and degree of soft to hard is very personal. Personally, I dislike NuPastels despite their popularity among some other pastelists. They are too hard for my approach. I learned long ago to use a very light touch; its easier on the finger joints. lol My "hard" pastels are some Cretacolor and Caran d'Ache that are used mostly for fine details, and some old Rembrandt and Mungyo "extra soft" pastels (really not all that soft). My most used are a mix of (in alphabetical order) Blue Earth, Girault, hand rolled Mungyo (their softest more expense line), Sennelier, Schmencke, Terry Ludwig, and Unison. I love them all! One way to experience the different texture and degree of soft or hardness is to look at Dakota Pastel Art, and purchase one of their Pastel Sampler sets of mixed brands; they have a "soft" set, and a "medium/hard set". The brands included are listed on the website. They do ship to Canada. It's a bit pricey, but less than randomly buying different brands one at a time here and there. Or you might just look at what they include in the sets, and see if you can find those brands in your area, buy one of each knowing which "category" they will fill. Since pastels are usually worked dark to light, hard/medium to soft you might consider buying colors that fill that "requirement".

anniecanjump
01-18-2019, 10:00 PM
Thanks again everyone. When I get a piece done with my new supplies, I will share it. I am working on a big colored pencil commission at this time so am anxious to get to my pastels.

Judy Manuche
01-29-2019, 09:30 PM
Hi Peggy,

I love all kinds of pastels, and my answer would be it depends on what you are actually painting. Softer looks require softer pastel, but if you want detail, harder ones are better...again that is my preference, we are all different! I also think that surface matters to me more than pastel. I like sanded surface, it grabs the pastel and holds it. I don't like smooth surface, but some people do the most beautiful paintings on it. You should try many different ones and find out which you like best. Some places sell a sample pack of several different surfaces. Hope that helps.