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chamisa
12-23-2018, 09:31 AM
Since there are some many threads on cleaning with oil I thought Iíd add some tips Iíve learned and others can hopefully share their tips.

1. If you use oil to clean while painting or as a medium, Iíve found using those small watercolor dishes (not big ones with a palette) that have small indented round or rectangular holes work great to fill with oil. I have a small one that only has six indents. Often if you use only one small dipping container it gets murky quickly with colored paint even if you wipe well first with a paper towel. Fill a few saucers up and you can dip darks in one, lights in the other etc etc and have a few clean ones for ending with a clean dip for storing over night. The indents wipe up easily with a paper towel and can keep reusing them with out a big cleanup.


2. Most of the commercial oil bottles come with a foil protection stuck to the bottle top when first opened. I donít take that foil off and poke a very small hole in it with a tooth pick and that way I can just add a small controlled drop or two to my paint. Avoids over oiling or needing to transfer oil to a stopper bottle.

3. Carder sells those expensive brush holders for oiled brushes to keep indefinitely stored there, but you can make cheap ones easily by cutting two pieces of cardboard ( thin cardboard works best) about 10Ē long and one wider than the other, say 2Ē and 2.5Ē then fold the two cardboard pieces in half lengthwise and take a knife or exactoblade and cut small Vs along the edges where you want your brushes spaced. Then set them far enough apart that brushes will sit stable and the shorter one then keeps the ferriles from getting too gummed up. I put plastic under the cardboard in case some oil drips off. You donít want the shorter one too short or the oil might drip off too much, just a little shorter. This also works for drying brushes so the water doesnít creep back into ferrule.

Ju-Ju-Beads
12-23-2018, 02:51 PM
ď you can make cheap ones easily by cutting two pieces of cardboard ( thin cardboard works best) about 10Ē long and one wider than the other, say 2Ē and 2.5Ē then fold the two cardboard pieces in half lengthwise and take a knife or exactoblade and cut small Vs along the edges where you want your brushes spaced. Then set them far enough apart that brushes will sit stable and the shorter one then keeps the ferriles from getting too gummed up. I put plastic under the cardboard in case some oil drips off. You donít want the shorter one too short or the oil might drip off too much, just a little shorter. This also works for drying brushes so the water doesnít creep back into ferrule.[/QUOTE]

Itís been a looong weekend; maybe thatís why my brain is so tired. Would you post a pic of your homemade brush holder?

chamisa
12-23-2018, 03:32 PM
Donít know how to post pictures, plus I am out,of,town for Christmas, but Iíll try to explain it more simplified.
óCut two pieces of cardboard approx 10Ē long and 2Ēor 3Ē wide. Make one a little less wide.
óFold in half lengthwise.
óCut small Vs at the fold part to hold brushes.
óSet them 6 or more inches apart with fold part up like a tent óó> ^ ^
óPut brushes on with shorter cardboard at brush end.

If still confused, try it with stiff printing paper just to get the measurements you want and the idea straight.

sidbledsoe
12-23-2018, 07:30 PM
Here is one I made from plywood for the sides and a 2 by 4 piece for the middle, but you can just use cardboard. It is very handy and I always use it

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Dec-2018/112587-rsz_dsc_0097.jpg

Seaside Artist
12-24-2018, 03:09 AM
You are so inventive Sid! Thanks for sharing. My dearest cousin used Mark's sample design and made me 2 of those out of plywood. I think they are wonderful!:thumbsup:

chamisa
12-24-2018, 01:24 PM
Nice Sid ó thanks!
I am handy enough to nail or drill pieces to a 2x4, but what did you use to make the brush holes? My husband has a drill is there a piece Iíd attach to the drill for wider holes?

One positive of the small cardboard brush holder tents is you can pack them up with you easily and they donít take much space in backpack, paint case, or French easel. One fits inside the other.
I made two cardboard tents that were only 6Ē long with four holes and was great for travel.
Another thing I do for Plein Air or travel is just wrap a small sandwich bag or strip of plastic wrap around the oiled brushes securely. Itís messier, but easy.

chamisa
12-24-2018, 01:33 PM
Since I use linseed or safflower oil for my only medium these days, I am always trying to find new ways to deal with the oil. One tip I use for oil dippers instead of the watercolor dishes is use small jar lids.
I save the small ones and then have two or three ready with a little oil in them for medium and for cleaning. Easy to wipe out and clean if they get too much paint mixed in.

Do any of you use just straight oil as your medium?

contumacious
12-24-2018, 02:04 PM
Another thing I do for Plein Air or travel is just wrap a small sandwich bag or strip of plastic wrap around the oiled brushes securely. Itís messier, but easy.

Be sure not to forget about any brushes that are wrapped up in something like I did unintentionally one time. They sat for quite a while. The oil was still liquid but the brushes had all taken a wonky set at odd angles with randomly distorted brush tips. Cleaning and shaping with Masters Brush Cleaner fixed them but they were not usable until they had dried for a few days with the brush cleaner in them.

sidbledsoe
12-24-2018, 03:49 PM
Chamisa, Mark Carder has a youtube video that shows how to do it.
I drew a center line on a plywood board, then I drilled a series of 3/4 inch holes
down the center line, centering the holes. then when it is cut down the center line, there will be half semi circles on each side, to then screw or glue onto the two by four.

Do any of you use just straight oil as your medium?
no way, adding oil is just diluting out the pigment/paint, kinda like making artist grade into student grade quality, and student grade even less.
I use straight solvent. It only takes a tiny dip of solvent to make the paint very easy to brush on, the viscosity is rapidly reduced with solvent, but the pigment/paint is hardly diluted.

chamisa
12-25-2018, 07:49 AM
I only use a very small drop of oil for medium and only if the paint is too
thick feeling. Why would it dilute the pigment in the paint any more than solvent or what I used to use as a solvent and oil mix that many painters use?

I just donít like having solvents in my studio anymore unless absolutely nessessary. Since paints already have quality oil in them, I figured itís okay as a medium as long as I use quality refined oil, and I like the feel of it in the paints, but maybe I missed something bad about using just oil?

sidbledsoe
12-25-2018, 10:22 AM
Sorry, don't worry Chamisa, there is nothing wrong with what you are using, many use only oil and no solvent at all, and it is just fine.
You asked if anyone used straight oil, and I am only talking about what I prefer and why, and speaking in very general terms. Solvent cuts the viscosity much faster than an oil, so much less is needed, then it evaporates, but oil doesn't.
There is also the conundrum I have with regard to painting with the procedure of fat over lean. As I paint, I add more medium at first, then less medium, then none, but if I used only oil to dilute with, then it would also making it more oily, fatter, and slower drying from start to finish, which is the opposite of what I want. Using only solvent rectifies that issue completely.

chamisa
12-25-2018, 06:09 PM
^^^^Yep, the slow drying part is definitely the downside of oil as medium.....