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View Full Version : Do I need to wait a year to glaze?


juliet45
12-11-2018, 02:20 AM
I recently saw a video on oil painting where the artist said that either you

1. Glaze the painting within the month OR
2. Wait a year before glazing

I am wondering if this is true as I have several paintings that have been standing around for some weeks which I wish to glaze. Do I now need to wait a year before doing so?

equinespirit
12-11-2018, 02:47 AM
Thats varnishing not glazing.
Glazing is the process of adding thin layers of paint.
To varnish the paint needs to be completely dry, I read that it was a minimum of 6 months.
Thats the first time Ive heard anybody say you could do it within a month.

Gigalot
12-11-2018, 03:38 AM
I can glaze fast drying paint layers after 14 days, but the best result you will have after two month of dying time.

juliet45
12-11-2018, 03:47 AM
Thanks.
I wish I could find the video again. By a landscape painter and it was definitely a lesson on glazing.

contumacious
12-11-2018, 04:01 PM
Interesting

stapeliad
12-11-2018, 05:25 PM
No just wait til the paint is touch-dry.
People love to be esoteric and complicated about very simple things.

WFMartin
12-11-2018, 05:35 PM
No just wait til the paint is touch-dry.
People love to be esoteric and complicated about very simple things.

I totally agree.

Touch-dry is the only criterion for adding a subsequent glaze layer of paint.
The test is to rub a bit of medium onto the dried paint to see if it will dissolve the paint. If it does, wait a few more days before applying your glaze layer of paint.

I often glaze by applying a very thin layer of glaze medium first, and then applying paint into it. So, that immediately indicates whether or not the previous paint layer is dry enough.

equinespirit
12-12-2018, 04:11 AM
How strange, I assumed you must have been talking about varnishing because of the years wait.
It would take an awfully long time to finish a painting if one waited a year between each glaze!

juliet45
12-12-2018, 04:41 AM
Oh dear. I've confused myself now! I seem to remember it was time for the underpainting to dry but not time in between glazes. It does sound extraordinary now I think about it and maybe I misunderstood.
Glad to know I can carry on with my paintings.

juliet45
12-12-2018, 04:56 AM
I have found the glazing demo I mentioned. I don't know how to do a link but if you put in - Marc Dalessio glazing video - it should take you there. As far as I can understand he does say to wait months between glazes or they will crack.

Humbaba
12-12-2018, 07:31 AM
I have found the glazing demo I mentioned. I don't know how to do a link but if you put in - Marc Dalessio glazing video - it should take you there. As far as I can understand he does say to wait months between glazes or they will crack.

If the layer to be glazed is dry to the touch, non sticky, you can proceed. The thumb test can also be useful.

I have seen cracking when using Burnt Umber as underpainting, this includes Raw Sienna, and the slow drying blacks. But if you follow sound practice methods, observe the Fat over lean rule, you shouldn't have a problem or a major issue. Limit or eliminate the use of Cobalt drier if it is not necessary and choose a flexible medium for glazing.

Mr. Dalessio is probably been too cautious, or plainly wrong, I don't know.

Adamphotoman
12-12-2018, 08:03 AM
Yes fat over lean!

If the underpainting is dry and not too thick and if it's medium is fairly oil free, then proceed with caution. Each successive layer needs to be a bit more oily than the lower one.

If the under paint is a thick oily impasto, then you can have problems with a dryer glaze skinning over and preventing the thick impasto paint from drying out.

There is a story of a large [I want to say Jules Olitsky?] oil painting which has to be turned upside down every year to allow the thick paint to flow the other way.

Varnishing has similar issues, and you do have to wait until the painting is dry before you varnish.

Some professional oil artists will use a retouch varnish sooner as it will breathe.

Gigalot
12-12-2018, 08:18 AM
I have found the glazing demo I mentioned. I don't know how to do a link but if you put in - Marc Dalessio glazing video - it should take you there. As far as I can understand he does say to wait months between glazes or they will crack.
Paint can crack when underlayer shrunk over time. To prevent shrinkage, you must wait until paint dries. Strong drying smell indicates that drying process isn't finished. Drying paint can lost smell after 14 days-two weeks of drying time. Paint dries faster when it is thinner, the weather is hot and painting surface is well illuminated. Strong light can speed up drying processes significantly.

bhindi
12-12-2018, 09:22 AM
I have read many articles on glazing online and also watched numerous videos. There seem to be two different techniques being called by the same name.

1. Glazing 1 - Painting thinly in layers into a couch made of medium, where the medium should be something less than 30% of the total mixture of paint and medium.

2. Glazing 2 - A very thin layer of paint-medium mixture where the paint is very visibly diluted by the medium. In this case, the medium would constitute a large portion of the mixture. This is explained and demonstrated in one video as such:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7PJ52L4H7E
It's not the best video on this glazing-in-the-end technique, but it makes the point.

There is also this article on glazing:
http://www.essentialvermeer.com/technique/technique_glazing.html

It states that "Modern art historian are apt to abuse the term and describe any layer of paint that is not completely opaque as a glaze."

--

Personally, I make use of both methods to produce different effects. Method 1 helps me build up my layers and method 2 allows me to play with shifting hues.
Shrinkage in oil painting layers in an observable phenomenon and I am convinced that allowing time for shrinkage will result in a long-lasting painting.

My wait time between layers continues to be a month or more. I never care about fat over lean.