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artsyroxy
12-08-2018, 05:17 PM
Presently, I paint around the sides of a 2" deep gallery canvas. I heard a judge at a show say he would prefer to see them taped or painted black. Painting the sides takes a substantial amount of time and effort. Taping would be much easier. What is the consensus for the proper treatment? Does it really matter?

WFMartin
12-08-2018, 05:46 PM
You need to realize that judges of shows are sometimes excessively opinionated, and will often offer comments such as you have experienced with this one.

In all my days of hanging paintings in art competition shows, and noting judges likes, and dislikes, I have NEVER ever heard of the concept of "taping the edges of gallery-wrap canvases". That is merely some judge's opinion, and a rather poor one, at that.

I would recommend that you always use paint on the edges of the canvas. You may paint it with one color, but I generally wrap the image around the edges of the canvas.

I never heard of applying tape around the edge of a gallery wrap--especially as being a preferable alternative to paint!

Does it really matter?

Yeah, it really matters!:angel: Within a couple of years, tape is quite likely to harden, crack, peel, become sticky, fade, fall off, etc., etc.

TomMather
12-08-2018, 05:57 PM
I think itís a matter of personal preference. An instructor in one of my art classes went on a rant one day against painting the edges, but I think it looks betteró and many agree. Iíve tried painting the edges solid black, and to me it looks worse than continuing the painting around the edges. When I paint the edges, however, I do it with less details.

AnnieA
12-09-2018, 12:26 AM
I recently started using gallery wrap and paint the sides. I think it adds interest to the piece. Like Tom, I've been using less detail on the sides than on the front surface.

BUT, I did a cityscape piece recently of a street corner located in a very progressive and colorful neighborhood and realized that in one of my reference photos there was a (probably) homeless guy selling a local homeless/poverty advocacy paper looking directly at me as I took the photo. Since I think he may be a fixture in the neighborhood, I was so tempted to paint him on the side of the painting. I still may!

AnnieA
12-09-2018, 12:31 AM
I recently started using gallery wrap and paint the sides. I think it adds interest to the piece. Like Tom, I've been using less detail on the sides than on the front surface.

BUT, I did a cityscape piece recently of a street corner located in a very progressive and colorful neighborhood and realized that in one of my reference photos there was a (probably) homeless guy selling a local homeless/poverty advocacy paper looking directly at me as I took the photo. Since I think he may be a fixture in the neighborhood, I was so tempted to paint him on the side of the painting. I still may!

contumacious
12-09-2018, 02:27 AM
There is no right or wrong way to deal with a gallery wrap. All the judge did was give you his opinion. As already stated it depends on what you like, so here I go what I like and don't like.

For me, unpainted raw canvas is the least attractive option. It looks tacky, cheap and unfinished. Next in the list as slightly less undesirable would be painted a solid color. I have never seen a solid painted wrap that looked good including my own attempts. The "least unappealing" of the three would be painting it so the image wraps around the sides, but I don't really like the look of that either. The vast majority of painted wraps do not look very good to me. Maybe 5 out of 100 that I have seen and done myself actually improved the piece. The only reason I use the third mentioned technique is to save money.

A quality frame always looks better to me than any of the three above. If you don't want a wide traditional frame a thin metal or real wood thin profile frame gives a professional look that cannot be matched by any type of wrap.

Raffless
12-09-2018, 03:33 AM
If your paintings good enough in the first place then do what you like. If its not so good they are more likely to notice.

Hamburgefions
12-09-2018, 05:35 AM
Never use tape.

I did it once on a few paintings and it loosens on some edges. Not much, but it attracks immediately the eye, even though they were in a black floater frame.


I had to remove the tape (sticky), and painted the borders black. I used black to eliminate reflections in the (black) frame.

Some frame shops use tape, because they don't want to paint the edges of your painting. And maybe they are right.

Pinguino
12-10-2018, 01:08 PM
Not being a gallery exhibitor, I'd never heard of using tape on the side of canvases. Certainly I've seen many non-framed modern paintings at the museums, but I don't recall seeing anything that might have been tape on the sides. Then again, professionally-attached tape might simply have been inconspicuous.

Browsing around the web, I did find sites that discussed this. Seems that some framers like to use tape (which won't be visible), presumably as a sort of cusion between canvas and frame. Others may apply tape to the sides of a non-framed canvas, for one reason or another. The sites caution that the simplest kind of tape (known as black "duct tape" in the USA) does not have an acid-free adhesive, and thus should be regarded as a temporary measure.

sidbledsoe
12-10-2018, 07:37 PM
You can use Flex Tape and it will stop any leaks you may have.
I like to acrylic paint the sides, the same color as the wall that I hang the painting on.
You can always repaint when you do your walls!