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antonm
12-07-2018, 06:25 AM
I have a couple of recurring problems when glazing, and I'm wondering if someone would be willing to share a tip or two:)

I keep having problems with my glaze tacking up/drying way way too fast.
Sometimes a few seconds, other times minutes.
I prefer being able to work around with the glaze for a while, and consider 10-30 minutes the bare minimum. But every medium I've tried keeps tacking up before I get to do what I want, sometimes ruining the painting completely.

Is there a wonder-medium out there for this purpose?
I would just love a medium that would give me more time when glazing, preferably while still drying within a reasonable time (24 hours is optimal but I'd gladly wait several days if that's what it takes)


The medium I'm using now from start to finish is regular drying linseed oil.
I've been working with liquin as well but prefer oil.

I found some helpful tips from wfmartin and others while searching through the forums but I'm wondering if someone will recommend a pre-made medium I can purchase somewhere?
Or can I add some resin to my linseed oil and make it work?


Any tips greatly appreciated!

Humbaba
12-07-2018, 06:57 AM
I have used drying linseed oil before, with no other ingredients, and takes 1 full day to reach the state you have mentioned.

Try working with Walnut or Stand oil mixed with a tiny amount of OMS, and see how they react. I cannot recommend a Pre-made medium, I use a homemade recipe that contains 15% Amber varnish in Walnut oil.

antonm
12-07-2018, 07:28 AM
Thanks!
Yeah I wonder why I keep having this problem, seems most people don't..
Maybe it's a curse:P

I should mention it doesn't happen every single time. But most often it does.
I don't understand why. When working on the first layer I can paint all night.
But when it's dry, and I want to coat it with a glaze the drying rate is sometimes staggering. I've been working around it but yesterday I almost lost a painting as this time the glaze dried up almost instantly, leaving a large patch of tacky glaze I couldn't manipulate any further.

I'll give your recipe a shot. I feel it's time I try several new mediums, I'm getting tired of this issue:)
I don't minde mixing together stuff, though pre-made saves (a bit) time

sidbledsoe
12-07-2018, 07:31 AM
Your medium may not be the issue.
I suspect that you may be using a thin glaze that may be absorbing
rapidly into the paint surface.Your medium/paint just doesn't dry that fast,
but it can absorb instantly.
I would try couching with your medium first.

antonm
12-07-2018, 07:50 AM
Thanks, but I feel pretty sure it is actually tacking/drying that fast.
If it was merely absorbtion shouldn't it be better when adding more paint/glaze?

Whatever the thing is, it does not help at all adding more paint, medium or both. The stickiness is absolute, and I have to use force to remove it once it happens (sometimes damaging the underlying layer)

I may be wrong here, that absorbtion can have this effect as well.
I'm very much a novice in this

JCannon
12-07-2018, 08:58 AM
I'll second Sid's comment. In my experience, the ground has the greatest effect on drying time. The medium is less important. On a smooth, glassy surface, drying takes a good while even if your only "medium" is turps. On a very absorbent surface such as illo board, a thin layer of oil dries very fast.

Whatever you are painting on is absorbent.

My suggestion would be a clear isolation coat of -- well, anything you choose. Liquin is as a good choice. Mind you, Alkyd is a funny thing: As an additive, it helps paint dry fast, but as an isolation layer, it can sometimes take a long, long time to dry completely -- as much as a couple of weeks. I'm not saying that this will happen to you, but don't be shocked if it happens.

Obviously, before you apply an isolation layer, you must be sure that any paint beneath it is absolutely dry.

If you are still searching for a slower-drying medium, I suggest walnut oil or safflower oil. Safflower is clearest of all and the slowest-drying of all. Make sure it's the kind of safflower oil available at the art supply store, not the grocery! However, when it comes to walnut oil, you can go to the grocery store: I've had good luck with Spectrum Natural Walnut Oil, refined and with no additives.

AnnieA
12-07-2018, 11:57 AM
One other possibility you might consider may be environmental. If you're working near a heat source, that will cause a thin layer to dry very fast (especially, I think, an alkyd-rich layer), while not affecting thicker layers as much. I had a similar problem some time ago in mid-winter because my easel was set up next to a heater; incandescent lighting too close to the surface could also potentially create an issue.

contumacious
12-07-2018, 12:43 PM
How old is your linseed oil? What is the brand and type?

Gigalot
12-08-2018, 11:16 AM
Test your oil on non-absorbent plastic. It must take several days to make a gel.
Use pure refined linseed oil for glazing. If your oil dries fast on painting surface, but stay wet on plastic, then check how much time you need to make well dried painting surface because glazing must be applied on DRIED oil paint and worst to use it on semidried oil painting surface.

Pinguino
12-08-2018, 02:59 PM
Test your oil on non-absorbent plastic. It must take several days to make a gel.
Use pure refined linseed oil for glazing. If your oil dries fast on painting surface, but stay wet on plastic, then check how much time you need to make well dried painting surface because glazing must be applied on DRIED oil paint and worst to use it on semidried oil painting surface.

Good advice.

The original post stated that the glaze medium was pure linseed oil. Is that really the case, or was there some solvent (turps, OMS, etc.) added to it?

Note that Liquin (and similar products) contains some solvent. That will interact with the underlying paint layer unless it is well-dried, not merely sort-of-dry. Pure oil is itself a solvent for other oil.

If the underlying paint layer is not well-dried, it will be softened by the glaze. And, presumably some of the active molecular fragments, generated as oil cures, will be mingled with the overlying glaze, causing it to dry faster. That will be especially true if the underlying not-yet-dry layer had certain siccatives.

Some pigments, such as the Umbers, contain Manganese compounds that act as a siccative. If your glaze contains any of these it will dry faster than it might otherwise dry, but yet I cannot imagine it drying as fast as you indicated.

sidbledsoe
12-08-2018, 07:22 PM
The medium I'm using now from start to finish is regular drying linseed oil.
This is a fast drying medium of linseed oil doped with some type of potent driers.
However, I don't believe it is this fast:
Sometimes a few seconds, other times minutes.

Pinguino
12-08-2018, 09:49 PM
This is a fast drying medium of linseed oil doped with some type of potent driers.

Ah. I had interpreted "regular drying linseed oil" to mean "ordinary linseed oil that should dry at its natural rate," rather than "linseed oil with driers added."

sidbledsoe
12-09-2018, 07:35 AM
I assumed that it was this Winsor Newton medium (I've been working with liquin as well but prefer oil.)since he also mentioned using Liquin.

Pinguino
12-09-2018, 02:08 PM
I assumed that it was this Winsor Newton medium since he also mentioned using Liquin.

Corrected link is here (http://www.winsornewton.com/uk/shop/oils-solvents-mediums-and-varnishes/oil-colour/oils/drying-linseed-oil-2-53-us-fl-oz-75ml-bottle-3021742).

antonm
12-11-2018, 02:31 AM
Thank you everyone!
Sorry for being absent for a couple of days.

Sidbledsoe is correct, that's the precise medium I've been using.
But I've had the same problem with liquin, and another oil-based medium(can't remember which, so there might very well have been driers in it). It seems you may have solved my problem, I'll go buy some mediums without driers.

I'm also curious about the tip about making an isolation layer with liquin.


About the layer underneath: The problem only occurs on the second layer of glaze. Meaning starting the painting is no problem. When it is dried I can work on top of it with another layer of glaze. However when going in for the third time the drying rate is insane. I use more medium in the second layer, and in the third, so it makes sense that the more medium is involved the worse the problem will be.

Thanks again for all your answers

KEVIN$
12-28-2018, 12:24 PM
I'm running into this same issue. I am using Liquin to thin the paints for easy blending of skin colors and it is getting too tacky on the canvas within an hour and it's so tacky that I can't finish it today. I am painting over the under painting I did 6 days ago. I need something that will allow a few hours or more of working time.

Kevin

Raffless
12-28-2018, 01:46 PM
I'm running into this same issue. I am using Liquin to thin the paints for easy blending of skin colors and it is getting too tacky on the canvas within an hour and it's so tacky that I can't finish it today. I am painting over the under painting I did 6 days ago. I need something that will allow a few hours or more of working time.

Kevin

Neo Megilp dries slightly slower than Liquin allowing you to re-wet a previous painting sessionís dry areas and paint into the medium. Liquin is useless for this (It dries too fast).

https://www.jacksonsart.com/gamblin-neo-megilp-soft-gel-oil-painting-medium

Richard P
12-28-2018, 02:48 PM
If you only need a few hours working time (on the panel/canvas) then maybe even Golden OPEN would work for you. They stay open for an hour or two. The reason I mention this is that there shouldn't be the same yellowing and cracking issues as you get with Oils.

For me, I prefer Oils, but just a suggestion :)