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babsalaba2
08-25-2000, 03:54 PM
What paper do you prefer?

I have painted on Strathmore 140 lb. Cold-Pressed paper- ok, but buckled quite a bit, despite having stretched it.

Arches 140 lb. CP block- great, but very thirsty paper, it sucks up the water very fast, and seemingly unevenly too.

Winsor & Newton 140 lb. Hot-Press block- fun, but it handles very differently from the Cold Press. I like it though; it seems easier to lift colors.

What do you think?

People have written in a lot about the Yupo Paper, which I read about in Artist's magazine a few months ago.

Has anyone had good results with any of Cheap Joe's Kilimanjaro paper?
Would anyone recommend 300 lb. paper over the 140 lb.?
Is there an absolutely FOOL-PROOF method for stretching paper? I have been using blocks mainly because of convenience.

Babs

VictoriaS
08-25-2000, 05:00 PM
I've been using Arches blocks, too -- to avoid stretching. (When you use the sheets instead of the blocks, you might want to preserve the deckled edges, which I guess is difficult to do if you stretch, so I think a heavier paper that doesn't need stretching would be preferable.) I found a very good website, www.handprint.com (http://www.handprint.com) (a strange website, but click on Watercolor and you can skip the strangeness) -- extremely informative about the handling characteristics of various brands of papers, brushes and paints. More informative than you need, maybe (like why do I need to know what a given paper sounds like when it's rattled, or what the ashes look like when you burn it?), but it did inspire me to order a bunch of new papers -- none of which I have yet tried and all of which I can't wait to try.

Mary Kay
08-25-2000, 05:28 PM
I have used many papers, but I keep coming back to Arches 140# or 300# cold press. I don't like blocks, I work very wet in the beginning stages and the blocks always buckle for me. Same with stretched paper, so I haven't stretched paper in 20 years. when I thoroughly saturate the paper, it doesn't curl or ripple until it starts to dry. Then I use bulldog clamps to clamp it to a piece of gator board.

If the paper ripples too much to work it dry, I flip it on the back, rewet it with a sponge, clamp it, then blowdry. I do this to every painting when it's done anyway, and it is stretched flat. no damage is done to the painting if no water touches it.

I've used Kilimanjaro, but the color seeps through onto the back if you work wet into wet, like a blotter paper. Winsor and Newton is a little softer than Arches, and Whatman is even softer than W&N. (Softer papers have less sizing). I guess I've learned how far I can push Arches paper, and I like the results.

The best thing to do is to try a variety of papers to see what works best for your style.

Good Luck and "Happy Painting"!!
Mary Kay

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sassybird
08-26-2000, 04:21 PM
About 20 yrs ago I used to paint on Hypro paper canvas with watercolors. It didn't buckled, had a smoother finish than most watercolor papers, and was archival. Now I can't find it anymore, and am on that road to experimenting again. I went through the Daniel Smith catalog and have decided to try one of each papers they offer to see what I like best. Daniel Smith has a 10 sheet minimum for loose paper, but they do allow you to mix.

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sass

Epicurea
08-30-2000, 02:58 AM
The arts & crafts section of my local Walmart carries a paper cavas, though I'm not sure of the brand name. I was thinking of buying & trying some for oil pastels, watercolor, and acrylic. Do you think all paper cavas is less likely to buckle, or was it just the quality of that particular brand?

Cassandra

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*Temet nosce.*

oleCC
08-30-2000, 07:29 AM
I always use the 300# arches, never stretch it but do tape all edges to a light weight board. Kilamanjaro gave me some serious problems, and I understand they had to re-do the formula for it. It still acts like a blotter and cannot be used on both sides.
Blocks are ok if you are not going to be painting very wet. I rarely use them. \
Whatever works for you !! http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif Carol

iyoung
08-30-2000, 01:33 PM
Fabriano Artistico 300# cp is by far my favorite cold press; Lana 140 hp my favorite hot press. Fabr. A. has a luxurious wove finish and allows you to have both high pigment intensity and brushy work at once, which you can't have with Arches since it's too absorbent and colors fade on it as they dry. Fabri.A. is also consistent & smooth enough to allow you to get predictable results in pigment dispersals for bloom effects. Lana is the smoothest and evenest hot press I've found. Both lift completely. Fabriano's Uno finishes are pretty good too. Lana doesn't buckle so you can use it in this lighter weight or in blocks if you're working small. Fabriano might buckle but will dry flat on its own unlike Arches.
Ilene

ameliajordan
08-30-2000, 04:23 PM
In class I've been using Waterford's 200 lb from CJAS. It's much heavier than 140 but only about $2 a sheet. Seems to be working well and holding up to rough treatment.

artwoman1
09-06-2000, 04:59 PM
Originally posted by babsalaba2:


Has anyone had good results with any of Cheap Joe's Kilimanjaro paper?
Would anyone recommend 300 lb. paper over the 140 lb.?

I used Kilimanjaro and it's a very fine paper. It is very white. If you want to try CJ's K paper he sells it in a sample pack. He has several reasonably priced sample packs by various manufacturer's so you can try them out to what suits you.
(Arches has come out with a whiter paper too. and it wouldn't surprise me to find that Arches is making Kilimanjaro for Cheap Joe. The scuttlebutt is that Cheap Joes sells more Arches than anyone in the country. That's leverage for him to cut a deal with Arches to make it for him.
PLEASE DON'T MISCONSTRUE WHAT I JUST SAID AS FACT. I'M JUST SPECULATING.
That said, I prefer 300# paper. Once I started using it I was convinced. I would never go back to #140. I also don't need to stretch 300# paper. I have a board with long plastic clamps for mounting 22x30" paper. I put a handle on it so its easier to carry because its a little heavy
I do use 140# paper in blocks for going into the field to paint. I also take 140# blocks on vacation for very portable painting. I was able to go to Paris last summer and I did some tiny paintings of Notre Dame and Chartres Cathedrals. I also painted in the Luxembourg Gardens.

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aw1

artwoman1
09-06-2000, 05:08 PM
Originally posted by artwoman1:
Originally posted by babsalaba2:


Has anyone had good results with any of Cheap Joe's Kilimanjaro paper?
Would anyone recommend 300 lb. paper over the 140 lb.?

I have used Kilimanjaro and it's a very fine paper. It's a little softer than Arches but I haven't had the problems others seem to have had and I've always thought of myself as a pretty juicy watercolor painter. It is very white. If you want to try CJ's K paper he sells it in a sample pack. He has several reasonably priced sample packs by various manufacturer's so you can try them out to see what suits you.
Arches has come out with a whiter paper too. and it wouldn't surprise me to find that Arches is making Kilimanjaro for Cheap Joe. The scuttlebutt is that Cheap Joes sells more Arches than anyone in the country. That's leverage for him to cut a deal with Arches to make it for him.
PLEASE DON'T MISCONSTRUE WHAT I JUST SAID AS FACT. I'M JUST SPECULATING.
That said, I prefer 300# paper. Once I started using it I was convinced. I would never go back to #140. I also don't need to stretch 300# paper. I have a board with long plastic clamps for mounting 22x30" paper. I put a handle on it so its easier to carry because its a little heavy
I do use 140# paper in blocks for going into the field to paint. I also take 140# blocks on vacation. I have a soft-sided attache for carrying my stuff and there is room for pads up to about 12x16". I was able to go to Paris last summer and I did some paintings of Notre Dame and Chartres Cathedrals. I also painted in the Luxembourg Gardens. I love the portability of watercolors.





[This message has been edited by artwoman1 (edited September 06, 2000).]