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artelahe
08-24-2018, 11:22 AM
Unlike oil, or acrylic and watercolor that can simply go in clearbags, pastels are delicate, smudgeable, etc.

Does anyone have advice or current or recent experience for selling small ones, in person, unframed (due to cost and weight) at fairs, bazaars, etc.?

Thanks in advance,

Aly

CaliAnn
08-24-2018, 12:29 PM
One thing you can do is mat your art, then put it in clear bags. I used to buy the mats for fairly cheap (they have gone up somewhat in price) in bulk on Amazon, came with mat and backing board - all acid free. If you looked around, you could probably find them even cheaper:

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HWFOUMK/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

artelahe
08-24-2018, 12:56 PM
One thing you can do is mat your art, then put it in clear bags. I used to buy the mats for fairly cheap (they have gone up somewhat in price) in bulk on Amazon, came with mat and backing board - all acid free. If you looked around, you could probably find them even cheaper:

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HWFOUMK/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Thank you for that link. Did the pastel dust ever mar the mats? Did you put the work in clearbags? Were they then flipped through in a bin, laid out on a table, set up on tiny stands? Thanks!

Did you have success? Was it worth your while?

CaliAnn
08-24-2018, 01:23 PM
I didn't sell them like that - I have shipped them in that manner and store them like that. I can tell you it's been a few years that I've had them stored like that, I have them in a rubbermaid bin and flip through them quite often when I want to look at them, or when someone else wants to see them - without any issues (did sell 4 of them when someone came over to my place and wanted to see my art work). I used primary sanded paper and whacked the back of the paintings before storing. I've also used some lascaux acrylic on some of them if I didn't use sanded paper or if I went over board on my pastel. To this day, they are fine. I've used with and without the plastic. I think if I were going to have people rummage through a bin, I'd have them all under plastic

P.S. The lascaux fixative never changed the colors of my pastels, at least not to my eye, they do make them a tiny bit shiny - but I never used a lot of it when spraying a painting, but funny thing is, those are the ones that sold the most, people seemed to like them better - go figure!

artelahe
08-24-2018, 02:22 PM
I didn't sell them like that - I have shipped them in that manner and store them like that. I can tell you it's been a few years that I've had them stored like that, I have them in a rubbermaid bin and flip through them quite often when I want to look at them, or when someone else wants to see them - without any issues (did sell 4 of them when someone came over to my place and wanted to see my art work). I used primary sanded paper and whacked the back of the paintings before storing. I've also used some lascaux acrylic on some of them if I didn't use sanded paper or if I went over board on my pastel. To this day, they are fine. I've used with and without the plastic. I think if I were going to have people rummage through a bin, I'd have them all under plastic

P.S. The lascaux fixative never changed the colors of my pastels, at least not to my eye, they do make them a tiny bit shiny - but I never used a lot of it when spraying a painting, but funny thing is, those are the ones that sold the most, people seemed to like them better - go figure!
]Huh! go figure! You store them matted and backerboarded? hmmm I hadn't thought of that. Mine are face down with glassine, not elegant by any stretch. The matting would help keep the painting flat, at least. my UART curls like a piece of birch bark if I don't keep a firm eye and weight on it. Even with the dehumidifier going all the time. I'll check out that link you provided. Thank you!

CaliAnn
08-24-2018, 03:02 PM
Yes, uart curls like crazy - one of the reasons I stopped using it when I was doing pastels. I store taped and the matted - you don't even have to put anything between them if you didn't want to. Also, the price was good enough on the backing board and mat, it made them easier to ship and prettier when people are looking at them. Because I only did standard sizes - simple for ppl to frame without the frame costing a fortune - ppl seemed to like that too

contumacious
08-26-2018, 08:17 PM
At the outset, mount your pastel paper on a rigid support BEFORE you create it.

When done cover, it with an exact same size sheet of Kromekote paper, taped on all four corners, wrappping the tape around to the back. Nothing I have tried will protect it better other than framing under glass. The Kromekot is glossy on one side. Put the glossy side against the pastel. It is a quantum upgrade to glassine, which I have found can be very destructive to pastels because it does not remain flat for long. The wrinkles and creases in glassine eat into the pastel often doing enough damage that repairs have to be made.

artelahe
08-29-2018, 03:24 PM
At the outset, mount your pastel paper on a rigid support BEFORE you create it.

When done cover, it with an exact same size sheet of Kromekote paper, taped on all four corners, wrappping the tape around to the back. Nothing I have tried will protect it better other than framing under glass. The Kromekot is glossy on one side. Put the glossy side against the pastel. It is a quantum upgrade to glassine, which I have found can be very destructive to pastels because it does not remain flat for long. The wrinkles and creases in glassine eat into the pastel often doing enough damage that repairs have to be made.

Thank you. Could you post a picture of this set up, please?

naomiball
09-05-2018, 01:15 PM
I read an article by Richard Mckinley (now I can't find it), he suggested making a permanent "sandwich" of pastel art with plexiglass, art and a backing board, and taping it all the way around. It can be handled freely, framed without additional glass and you don't have to ever worry about dust falling because it is tightly held in place never to be undone.



I tried it with my own art and really liked the look and feel of it. It costs more to do it that way but it is an added value to your art so raise your price.


Naomi

naomiball
09-05-2018, 04:21 PM
For example:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2018/1053772-DSCN6122m750.jpg

The wrinkles you see on the front are the cling film that comes on the plexiglass. I pulled it back just far enough to apply the clear tape, that is why it is wrinkled. The tape I used I got from the Michael's store in the scrapbook section, it is "permanent".

The edges of the plexiglass, foam core and art are completely covered all the way around so no moisture can get in.