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View Full Version : Golden Open vs Winsor Newton Professional


Linda Wolff
04-15-2018, 04:44 PM
I am accustomed to using Golden Open acrylics. I've been asked to teach a beginner's class in acrylics and may consider using the new Winsor Newton Professional Acrylics only because they claim little or no color shift because their binder is clear not milky. Is the difference significant? Has anyone used both and could give me a review? I do like using airbrush medium with my Golden Open Acrylics rather than water as it eliminates the concern about using too much water and weakening the binder. However, it is milky so if it was used with the Winsor Newton Professional Colors it would probably add some color shift even though the Winsor Newton binder in its paint is clear. Your thoughts please. I went to the Winsor Newton web site and there does not seem to be a way to contact them.

Patrick1
04-15-2018, 06:55 PM
I used W&N Pro Ultramarine Blue and I was disappointed (but not surprised) there is some color shift (darkening) from wet to dry. I haven't done a side-by-side comparison with other pro-grade acrylics, so I can't say how much less of a drying shift there is, if at all. Generally, higher quality acrylics exhibit less darkening as they dry. Or a more correct way to put it: the wet color is darker/closer to the final dried color. Also, lighter colors exhibit less drying shift.

I also have a W&N Pro Napthol Red which I've only done a few color swatches with. It too, seems good, but not quite as top-notch as Golden Heavy Body in terms of pigmentation. I haven't yet tried Golden Open that you're using, supposedly their pigmentation isn't quite up to Golden Heavy Body.

Also, if I'm not mistaken, the W&N Pro acrylics have a more consistent sheen level across colors - achieved by an additive that reduces the maximum pigmentation level possible.

W&N Pro are very good acrylics, as are Golden, Tri-Art, Liquitex Heavy Body, and others. Difference in gloss level and viscosity among brands might be a more noticeable difference than drying shift or pigmentation levels. Not sure I completely answered your question, all I can say is try different brands and see which you like best.

Linda Wolff
04-15-2018, 09:58 PM
Thank you for your comments, Patrick. Hope others will chime in as well.

Patrick1
04-17-2018, 11:19 AM
I hope to hear others' input too - I'm sure some people here have used both Golden and W&N Pro, and others. My observations are largely anecdotal because I rarely have the same color/pigment in more than 1 brand of paint.

I too, as much as possible, avoid using water to dilute acrylics because that lightens it probably more than anything else. I often use paint straight from the tube undiluted and also use acrylic mediums (no water) or Golden Retarder. I will eventually try the W&N Pro acrylic mediums specifically because they are the same binder as used in the Pro Acrylics. If they merely have less drying shift than other brands, that's good enough for me :)

traxx
04-17-2018, 06:57 PM
W&N claims their binder is clear but after purchasing their gloss and glazing medium I found out these are still quite milky. They’re good acrylics but they still darken as much (or more) than Golden HB.

Linda Wolff
04-17-2018, 07:00 PM
Hmmmm. May just stick with the Golden Open.

Ellis Ammons
04-17-2018, 08:00 PM
I haven't tried W&N. But as already stated the best thing to do is use a medium with gloss and no water. Trying to paint on a matte black is a frustrating ordeal as your wet paint will not match the dry. And as it drys it will constantly shift.
Open acrlics make color shift harder for me because they stay wet longer and I keep working them and when they finally do dry it's all much darker than I intended while working them. If I use a gloss medium and they dry quickly then I can at least see what I'm working with and make corrections. Blending can be done with fast drying acrylics you just have to be quick :). It's not really a beginner thing and takes experience.

Plus I think the slow drying and open acrylics continue to darken over even more time.. Maybe even days. I haven't tested it out though.