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artbymatt
04-11-2018, 01:26 PM
Does anyone have experience photographing their art to sell prints from? I have a Canon T6i and the photos I took are coming out exactly straight, there is a slight curve. Is this normal?

I'm not sure if it's the camera (I didn't see this problem when I used my smartphone). Or the wall that I used as a backdrop (The building I'm in is kind of old and not the highest quality).

I can't upload the photos here since they're too large, but they are on my DA account: artbymattm.deviantart.com

fedetony
04-11-2018, 02:25 PM
Its a common question in the forum, you need to read a bit to find the info you look for:
Search in WC (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/search.php?searchid=161424)

Charlie's Mum
04-11-2018, 03:18 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1357848
Scroll down this thread to some info about photographing work.

You could also have the work photographed professionally ..... or, if having prints made by professional firms, uploading the file to them takes the photo responsibility off you!

theBongolian
04-11-2018, 03:50 PM
Does anyone have experience photographing their art to sell prints from? I have a Canon T6i and the photos I took are coming out exactly straight, there is a slight curve. Is this normal?

I'm not sure if it's the camera (I didn't see this problem when I used my smartphone). Or the wall that I used as a backdrop (The building I'm in is kind of old and not the highest quality). I can't upload the photos here since they're too large, but they are on my DA account: artbymattm.deviantart.com
If everything is aligned but the pictures seem to "bow" out - this is caused by distortion from a wide angle lens, or a zoom set wide. There are digital profiles for specific lenses that can correct for this. Lightroom has a profile for the w.a. lense i use. There may be generic corrections that can be applied, I haven't had the need to look into it. If not, move the camera back and use a longer (more telephoto) lens.

If your artwork is small enough to fit on a scanner, this is the best way to copy artwork.

theBongolian
04-11-2018, 03:55 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1357848
Scroll down this thread to some info about photographing work.
.. or, if having prints made by professional firms, uploading the file to them takes the photo responsibility off you!
But the file you send them would have been taken by your camera! If the file is bad the prints will be bad.

If you can't take a good photo with your camera then you would have to send them the artwork to be photographed.

gaykir
04-11-2018, 04:53 PM
We have an artist here who is expert but I won’t put up His contact info without permission. His name is Rick Givens and he owns Sweet Pixels which you can google. Hopefully he will see this thread and chime in. He has photographed for me in the past.

artbymatt
04-11-2018, 05:43 PM
Thanks for the replies. My main concern was the quality of the images. There was a slight "bow". No matter how hard I tried to straighten them up it was still there. I wasn't sure if I should just crop out park of the artwork or not.

Eraethil
04-11-2018, 08:15 PM
Hey Matt. Look for lens distortion correction features in your photo editing software. Photoshop has features for the correction you need to do, but I cannot speak to other packages.

theBongolian
04-11-2018, 09:02 PM
Thanks for the replies. My main concern was the quality of the images. There was a slight "bow". No matter how hard I tried to straighten them up it was still there. I wasn't sure if I should just crop out park of the artwork or not.
Wide angle lens distortion cannot be cropped out, so you must be talking about keystoning. If the camera is not centered and on a 90 degree axis from the artwork, or if the artwork is cantered or not at right angles to the floor, then some degree of keystoning will occur. This can be compensated with editing software like Photoshop - that makes compensating distortion so the effects of keystoning will be less obvious. For mild keystoning, and minor cropping imo this is acceptable. But better to re-photograph and be very precise about the setup.

caldwell.brobeck
04-11-2018, 09:21 PM
Thanks for the replies. My main concern was the quality of the images. There was a slight "bow". No matter how hard I tried to straighten them up it was still there. I wasn't sure if I should just crop out park of the artwork or not.
Use a fixed focal length (prime) lens. I have Nikon D3100, and use the Nikkor 50mm 1:18 G lens for photographing artwork, like this one (https://www.nikonusa.com/en/nikon-products/product/camera-lenses/2199/af-s-nikkor-50mm-f%252f1.8g.html). It works quite well for this.
Cheers,
Chris

artbymatt
04-11-2018, 09:22 PM
Hey Matt. Look for lens distortion correction features in your photo editing software. Photoshop has features for the correction you need to do, but I cannot speak to other packages.

Unfortunately I don't have any good photo editing software. I have MS Paint, and GIMP.

Charlie's Mum
04-12-2018, 09:37 AM
How big is the artwork itself?

Can you scan instead of photo'ing?

This is Rick G's profile (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/member.php?u=147850) - he hasn't been in this forum or a while but you could pm him for advice. (Gayle mentioned him in her post above).

LavenderFrost
04-12-2018, 10:09 AM
Happens to me all the time. I try to take the photo as straight as possible and then crop the edges. I use Gimp for all my photo editing.

bartc
04-12-2018, 11:52 AM
All the photographic and digital remedies have already been posted. If you cannot do this properly at home, then consider going down to a Fedex that has quality scanning for a reasonable price. That's a decent alternative to a really fine photographer doing high quality work for you, which is best of all if you plan on selling giclees or prints.

Dcam
04-12-2018, 12:31 PM
Photoshop elements has a terrific fix for this problem and is inexpensive. If you are serious about getting good quality it is worth getting photo software.
Really a necessity in my opinion.
The other thing you can try is to step back further and then use your zoom to come in on the image, then shoot. The closer you are to the image you are shooting, the more distortion.
Good luck.

VA_Artist
11-26-2018, 07:53 AM
Photoshop elements has a terrific fix for this problem and is inexpensive.



I have Photoshop Elements but haven't noticed the feature you mention. It it a filter?

cliff.kachinske
11-26-2018, 12:16 PM
You get less distortion with a longer focal length lens.

On a 35 mm. camera, the "normal" lens is 50 mm. That is the diagonal of a 35 mm image size. They are terrible for portrait work. What you really want, at a minimum is a lens that has a focal length 1.5 times the diagonal of the image size, or 75 mm for a 35 mm camera.

If you're taking pictures with your phone, get one of those telephoto gizmos or use photo software. On a point and shoot digital camera, use optical zoom to put yourself further away. On a digital SLR, get a short telephoto lens or use the zoom function.

Adamphotoman
12-17-2018, 10:18 AM
I have rephotographed many many paintings, previously captured from various sources. It is always best to go back to the original art work if possible. Scanners can work [ok] from gouache and watercolours, but shiny dark oils and acrylics with brushstrokes and knife work will be at a serious disadvantage. Also shiny graphite [pencil] can flash back therefore losing detail and depth in the print. Stitching larger art work can be done, but fragile pastels will be easily damaged on a flatbed scanner. Then there is the matter of cleanliness....dust, scratches, or work that still needs time to cure.
Heat and UV from the flatbed can be destructive too!

There is no one right way to digitally capture artwork. Each type needs to be assessed and dealt with in such a way that represents them to advantage. For instance, a glossy impasto with aggressive brush strokes would be best shown with those brush strokes and palette knife marks; and a watercolour on Rough paper might be best by not showing the paper texture [if] the work is to be printed on a heavily textured paper [the 2 textures can fight creating a distracting moire effect]....[If] that same watercolour is to be printed on a smooth paper, perhaps texture should show in the image capture. Then there are paintings which make use of metallics and glass/ceramic mosaics which make use of both dichroic and textured glass.

As a previous post mentioned, If the service bureau making the prints did not make the digital image, then they will be able to wash their hands of responsibility and you will pay for what you get.

In the end it is what you the artist is willing to accept.

A proper setup is paramount to success. This includes fiddly camera alignment, a good lens, proper lighting, and colour management. I know artists that have acquired the skill set and equipment to do their own photography and printing. Then the bar is usually set at a different position.
Digital cameras are only tools and they were designed to take pictures of blue skies, trees, mountains and fluffy clouds. Cameras mostly ramp up contrast and create colour casts. Lenses and lighting create uneven pictures. All these challenges can be successfully overcome with software and hardware.

Adamphotoman
12-17-2018, 11:16 PM
Here is a couple of images. One is a detail from my mother's oil from a flatbed scanner and another from my camera. I hope the low res that WC allows will show the difference.

Adamphotoman
12-17-2018, 11:41 PM
try this again
Okay the one image shows some texture and the other has flashback from the flatbed