PDA

View Full Version : Langdon Street Bridge, Montpelier, Vermont


DMSS
03-25-2018, 06:36 PM
About 8 x 10, acrylic on acrylic paper. An attempt to keep it simple, to omit a lot of detail, and to not be faithful to my reference photo. Actually, I made a mistake. C&C welcome.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Mar-2018/1351569-Rialto_Bridge_Montpelier.jpg

Phranque
03-25-2018, 06:44 PM
May I suggest doing more layering? Perhaps start with a darker gesso, and paint dark to light. You'd be able to achieve more depth. It's easier to paint larger pieces than to paint small ones, so maybe do some big paintings as you're learning.

DMSS
03-26-2018, 07:35 AM
Thank you, Phranque. Where I wrote, "I made a mistake," what I meant to say was I made a mistake with the name of the bridge with my original post. But now it is correct, it is the Langdon Street Bridge.

Hairy wolf
03-30-2018, 02:26 AM
I completely disagree with Phranque’s comment. Trying to impose the “learned academic style” on the work of a painter who shows originality, simplicity and certain naïveté is wrong. This is a lovely piece containing all of these qualities.

DMSS
03-30-2018, 08:25 AM
I completely disagree with Phranque’s comment. Trying to impose the “learned academic style” on the work of a painter who shows originality, simplicity and certain naïveté is wrong. This is a lovely piece containing all of these qualities.
Thank you, Hairy wolf. Up close, as in this photo, it looks naive. From about 12 feet away it looks less so. I kind of like that the perception of the painting changes as one's distance from it changes. I am thinking of painting the same scene again, but this time deemphasizing further the illusion of depth, i.e., going for an even more posterized look.

Phranque
04-01-2018, 05:16 AM
I completely disagree with Phranque’s comment. Trying to impose the “learned academic style” on the work of a painter who shows originality, simplicity and certain naïveté is wrong. This is a lovely piece containing all of these qualities.
That's kind of funny, considering I'm self taught. :) in my experience working on a dark ground is a quick way to ad depth and richness to a painting.