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annette71
03-15-2018, 12:03 PM
Yesterday i received my first box of oil pastels. Sennelier, very creamy, very nice set...

I thought oil pastels would enable me to paint my "fragments" paintings more quickly... and i think they will work just fine.

But i consider myself a dry pastel artist, and i'm sure i will find challenges in using oil pastels the minute i try to step out of the "fragments" style... if i ever do use the oil pastels for something other than fragments, that is...

Any pointers? Thoughts? Advice?

Do any of you guys do work in both dry and oil pastels? (I mean, do you use both mediums... i know you cannot use them at the same time in the same painting... :) )

Best,

Annette

water girl
03-15-2018, 04:51 PM
Annette, you could also pose this question in the oil pastel forum.

PeggyB
03-16-2018, 12:43 AM
Annette I use and have taught both oil and dry pastels. Although one might think they are related because of the word "pastel", they are about a small alike as oil paint is to watercolor. The pastels are both applied directly, and oils/watercolor applied with brushes. Dry pastel and oils are in general applied dark to light. Oil pastels and watercolors must preserve the lightest colors and are applied light to dark. For that matter, some oil pastels are so transparent it is important to either apply them first or not put a darker color first where you want them. Yellow is the first one to come to my mind for transparency. Yes, I do know a method of placing yellow over other colors, but it's not ideal. 🙂

You are going to love the Sennelier; they lay down like butter! Oil pastels need to be framed under glass just as do dry pastels. You will find the oil pastel forum to be as welcoming and helpful as the pastel forum is. You can search far back thre to see some of my oil pastel work.

I just went to the OP forum, and found this image so you won't have to look too hard.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Mar-2018/1976948-IMG_0841.JPG

stapeliad
03-19-2018, 04:02 PM
I love oil pastels and I have a bunch (love those Senns)...but I consider them to be a completely different medium to soft pastels and I never mix the 2.

Soft pastels are considered a painting medium in the same category as oils, acrylics, watercolor etc.

But oil pastel isn't as far as I am aware. (correct me here if I am wrong) I don't know why that is because the artist quality ones certainly are artist grade materials, and professional-quality work can certainly be done with them. And those Senns aren't cheap!!!

There is the Oil Pastel Society, and we do have a separate oil pastel forum here on WC.

I use mine in my sketchbook for color studies, or just messing around when I feel like working in OP. But I would never do a finished formal painting in them, and I don't even use them for plein air.

PeggyB
03-19-2018, 06:17 PM
I love oil pastels and I have a bunch (love those Senns)...but I consider them to be a completely different medium to soft pastels and I never mix the 2.

Soft pastels are considered a painting medium in the same category as oils, acrylics, watercolor etc.

But oil pastel isn't as far as I am aware. (correct me here if I am wrong) I don't know why that is because the artist quality ones certainly are artist grade materials, and professional-quality work can certainly be done with them. And those Senns aren't cheap!!!

There is the Oil Pastel Society, and we do have a separate oil pastel forum here on WC.

I use mine in my sketchbook for color studies, or just messing around when I feel like working in OP. But I would never do a finished formal painting in them, and I don't even use them for plein air.

You are correct in saying dry pastels and oil pastels are completely different mediums. Oil paint and acrylic paint have a brush in common, oil pastels and dry pastels are both sticks; they all are made with natural or created pigments, and they are all different art mediums. Oil pastels ARE considered a painting medium just as much as dry pastels are.

Dry and oil pastels can be used together once you know what to do, but then they are considered a mixed medium work of art.

VERY few dry pastel societies include both mediums in their competitions, and I concur. To me it is similar to including watercolors in an all oil painting competition; just not done. I know PSA and IAPS do not accept oil pastels in their exhibitions.

lisaastrup
02-17-2019, 05:11 AM
I have worked with oil and soft pastels, not very long...just this month, and I wondered on the difrence too.
I made theese similar paintings, just to get the feel of it, I think I like the soft pastels best, the OPís get very heavy and compact.

c and c is welcome

photo will not load from ipad....posting it later

lisaastrup
02-17-2019, 05:47 AM
I have worked with oil and soft pastels, not very long...just this month, and I wondered on the difrence too.
I made theese similar paintings, just to get the feel of it, I think I like the soft pastels best, the OPís get very heavy and compact.

c and c is welcome

photo will not load from ipad....posting it later

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Feb-2019/79005-vspastels.JPG

contumacious
02-20-2019, 11:31 AM
I would be more interested in oil pastels if there was some way to get them to dry fully once the piece is completed so they could be displayed without glass. My understanding is that they will never dry due to the non drying oils used in their manufacture. I haven't used any since I was a kid, (Cray-Pas?) but would like to try some of the Sennelier offerings despite the never drying thing.

lisaastrup
02-20-2019, 01:53 PM
I would be more interested in oil pastels if there was some way to get them to dry fully once the piece is completed so they could be displayed without glass. My understanding is that they will never dry due to the non drying oils used in their manufacture. I haven't used any since I was a kid, (Cray-Pas?) but would like to try some of the Sennelier offerings despite the never drying thing.

I was thinking the same, but gave it a try anyway, they are nice to work with.
Watercolor and pastels has to be framed too, so....:wave:

But I work with many mediums, oils, acrylic and oilpastels and much more :wave:

PeggyB
03-08-2019, 05:37 PM
Since this was first started, I discovered a brand of oil pastel that has a water soluble variety - Mungyo. They are quite soft and go down very nicely. Adding water to them is optional, but when you do it too works very nicely. There aren't a lot of color choices in this set, but since you can add water it isn't too hard to produce new colors. It's a bit like working with watercolors: you still need to preserve the lightest values because putting a dark down first won't allow a lighter color to show. That as you probably know is the opposite from dry pastels.

PeggyB
03-08-2019, 05:38 PM
Don't know why the above posted twice. Moderators, please remove this one.

chuas2
03-20-2019, 02:59 PM
I would be more interested in oil pastels if there was some way to get them to dry fully once the piece is completed so they could be displayed without glass. My understanding is that they will never dry due to the non drying oils used in their manufacture....

You're correct. Traditional oil pastels do not dry...ever. So they have to be under glass. Oil sticks are like oil paint. They dry, although I think even they take a few months to dry completely. The water-soluble oil pastels do dry tho. Portfolio by Crayola are the best. Soft, with a lot of pigment. Still, they're more like drawing tools best for mixed media.