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john
03-04-2018, 03:37 PM
Why do some abstracts grab us and others don't?

I was just wondering this while looking at graphicali's new painting. It seems that many of us like it. Why?

Are there any key elements needed for a succesful abstract? Is there anything that most people can agree on this.

I can speak for myself that I prefer some structure to them. Some cohesive plan evident, as in graphicali's painting. It probably has to do with the way my brain works. Others may like random chaotic type abstracts.

Is it even possible to say why?

ronsu18
03-04-2018, 05:21 PM
a sunday puzzle? :)
the good ones feel alive. you lay your eyes on them and it's as if some kind of exchange begins, where the work of art 'behaves' in a manner i'm used to seeing in people. abstractly speaking, of course. it's back and forth not just once, but the work transforms minute to minute, (rothko!) right in front of you, and it's like meeting a new acquaintance. you look and listen to everything trying to learn to know them and the good ones connect with you. they are a character.

what makes a good=interesting character?

birdhs
03-04-2018, 09:40 PM
Algorithm thinking?

Why do some folks like one thing over another?
The only answers become generalizations
then everyone wants to do the same thing.
I love things that are off from the norm.
Not formulated by a theory of what must be what.

If anyone ever comes up with the answer to this question...

john
03-04-2018, 09:56 PM
a sunday puzzle? :)
the good ones feel alive. you lay your eyes on them and it's as if some kind of exchange begins, where the work of art 'behaves' in a manner i'm used to seeing in people. abstractly speaking, of course. it's back and forth not just once, but the work transforms minute to minute, (rothko!) right in front of you, and it's like meeting a new acquaintance. you look and listen to everything trying to learn to know them and the good ones connect with you. they are a character.

what makes a good=interesting character?


I like that decription ronsu. A puzzle. Solving it gives one satisfaction.

An exchange and meeting a new character.

Those eyes called me from across the dance floor, and then I looked into them as we danced.


What makes a good/interesting character? Novelty, depth, charisma?

john
03-04-2018, 10:09 PM
Algorithm thinking?

Why do some folks like one thing over another?
The only answers become generalizations
then everyone wants to do the same thing.
I love things that are off from the norm.
Not formulated by a theory of what must be what.

If anyone ever comes up with the answer to this question...

"Not formulated by a theory of what must be what."

Ah yes, doesn't this describe abstraction in general? It surprises us. It breaks rules. It dances in ways we have never seen before. To do "the worm" one has to writhe upon the floor. It embarrasses us and seems silly, but it's fun once inhibitions can be overcome.

Abstract art is a dancing fool and is having more fun than anyone else.

Katie Black
03-05-2018, 03:29 PM
For me, a number of factors have to be there for me to enjoy an abstract painting.

I look for composition, colour, unity and more. This is not a checklist that I rigidly adhere to because often a painting might not have those, but it may have something else, something indefinable and special that conveys a certain mood.

Bilateral
03-05-2018, 05:49 PM
I'm attracted to visual symphonies that don't necessarily ascribe to the characteristics of any particular style. Movement, interrelationships, a degree of abandon, but not chaos. It is sublime to be able to feel the touch of the artist's hand in a finished piece. Abstract art is the best sort of magic and if you fall under its spell, your question is answered, yes?

graphicali
03-05-2018, 05:59 PM
What is enjoyable depends on who is looking! As Greggo said, If anyone ever comes up with the answer to this question..

Boafamily
03-06-2018, 09:01 AM
Everything is energy and some abstracts have a clear jolt associated with them while other may calm or even upset us in some ways and even when we don't like a particular piece there is still a release happening; however itís just not as welcoming or powerful...

john
03-07-2018, 02:51 PM
So to sum up the posts so far... some the descriptive words/ideas used for good abstraction.....

puzzle
connection
exchange
interesting
unusual, abnormal, unexpected
indefinable
mood
symphony
movement
controlled abandon ( I like this one)
magic spell
energy
jolt
calm
upset
welcoming
powerful

******


I think we are getting somewhere? I think so because these words cannnot all be used to describe all kinds of art.

La_
03-07-2018, 04:20 PM
Story - some expression of some kind of reason for being, even if it's for the simple sake of pretty/beauty or bloody ugly/harsh or chaotic or freaking crAzy.

if it doesn't tell me one, if i can't make up a story to fit it, then it's just not grabbing me, abstract or otherwise, producing or viewing, to me, it has to say Something.

that's a pretty loosey goosey bunch of blather tho really, plenty of my works 'stories' say things like, 'scuse me, coming through with a new experimental learning curve'.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Mar-2018/84648-electricf.gif

la

harrymspitz
03-07-2018, 05:21 PM
Kandinsky was one of the 1st Modern Abstract painters. He said that abstract painting was the most difficult of art forms. I think that many people who are making abstract paintings are doing it because they think that it is easy but I think that the old Russian guy knew what he was talking about.

harrymspitz
03-07-2018, 05:29 PM
"Realistic" paintings are of something. Abstract paintings are something. Realistic paintings are pretend windows. Abstract paintings are not windows.
Realistic paintings are unrealistic lies that try to fool the eyes. Abstract paintings are real honest and concrete.

Artchrispy
03-07-2018, 07:50 PM
Why do some abstracts grab us and others don't?

I was just wondering this while looking at graphicali's new painting. It seems that many of us like it. Why?

Are there any key elements needed for a succesful abstract? Is there anything that most people can agree on this.

I can speak for myself that I prefer some structure to them. Some cohesive plan evident, as in graphicali's painting. It probably has to do with the way my brain works. Others may like random chaotic type abstracts.

Is it even possible to say why?

These questions also apply to representational art. The components of abstract and representational art (composition, color, value, texture, form contrast, drawing, depth of field, mood, theme) are not that different. Is it fair to say that it is more difficult to produce quality work in one genre? Both abstraction and representation can be judged or assessed by the same standards with the exception of trueness of subject. And not all paintings of fruit baskets are the same and shouldn't be lumped into one category. Same goes for all acrylic paint pours. There are needed elements in each and every genre for success.