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View Full Version : Pen/Ink shading samples


artdude
07-12-2001, 07:27 PM
Here are just a few ways to add some shading to your ink drawings. I am certainly no expert but I thought these might help out some inkers that are just starting out. These were all done free hand so please excuse some of the not so straight lines in the "Parallel Line" sample. I used a 005 tech pen for all of the examples. You will also notice in the "Parallel Line" sample, that there seems to be a crack or line near the bottom of the sphere. That is there because some of my lines stopped at the same spot. Therefore giving you the impression there is a line there. This is a good way to suggest straight or cuvred lines in your work without actually drawing THAT line. Hope some of this will help you in your ink adventures :D

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Jul-2001/inksamples.gif

NorahT
07-12-2001, 09:56 PM
Thanks for the shading samples artdude. I am familiar with crosshatching, but will have to practise some for the contour lines and stippling.

dupliKate
07-12-2001, 10:37 PM
Thanks ArtDude! I'm going to try the stippling technique on my next ink attempt. I'll save your samples to my hard drive.

More please!

:) K

RuthT
07-12-2001, 10:57 PM
Terrific artdude, and very kind. They will be a great help. Am going to read up how to save to hard drive. Have been trying to get some drawing done - ah well, maybe tomorrow. :)

mclaughlin
07-13-2001, 03:35 AM
Thanks, I like people who share with others.
I will certainly start looking for ink - Art. Does the name
Max Klinger ring a Bell ?

MarkL
07-13-2001, 06:32 AM
hey good on ya for showing some tecniques
If I had a scanner handy I would have added scribble as a quick way to add shape and form plus a few other tips mmmmm wonder if we could get a thread going on this?

artdude
07-13-2001, 11:41 AM
Originally posted by MarkL
hey good on ya for showing some tecniques
If I had a scanner handy I would have added scribble as a quick way to add shape and form plus a few other tips mmmmm wonder if we could get a thread going on this?

Thanks Mark and everyone who has responded so well to these examples.

I could have added the "Scribble" technique...guess I just ran out of time when I was putting this together. There is also "Wavy Lines" and they are great for "Wood, Marble, Water etc. There are also some "Pen Control" exersises that I could make up too. Too bad you don't have a scanner Mark. You could jump right in with these examples :D Well thanks again everyone for your input.

artdude
07-13-2001, 11:45 AM
Originally posted by mclaughlin
Thanks, I like people who share with others.
I will certainly start looking for ink - Art. Does the name
Max Klinger ring a Bell ?

You're welcome mclaughlin :) hmmmm...I don't think I have heard of Max Klinger..is he an ink artist?

artdude
07-13-2001, 12:12 PM
Originally posted by RuthT
Terrific artdude, and very kind. They will be a great help. Am going to read up how to save to hard drive. Have been trying to get some drawing done - ah well, maybe tomorrow. :)


Hi Ruth: Glad you will find these examples usefull :) To save the example to your hard drive, just "right click" with your mouse anywhere on the sample and a small rectangular window will pop up. Scroll down to where it says "Save picture as" and click on that. A new window will then pop up for your hard drive files. Pick the folder where you want to save the pic and just and click the save button in that window. Now you have it saved on your computer :D

animal
07-13-2001, 12:19 PM
Thanks for these examples Artdude! I am going to try and practice these in my pen and ink drawings .:cool:

RuthT
07-14-2001, 08:57 AM
Thank you for your help once again artdude. I have now successfully saved the shading examples to my hard drive. Added my vote to the poll as extremely helpful. :)

auntie_chaos
10-22-2001, 08:06 AM
Thanks artdude for the shading tips. I'm sure I'll re-reference them a few more times once I start trying my hand at drawing. I used to do not bad at drawing ... mainly sketches (with pencil) and charcoal ... back in secondary school but have lost alot of the touch. Maybe someday I'll do something that I'll be able to post on here ... M-A-Y-B-E! :)

Christie
10-22-2001, 02:16 PM
Nice work and a good reminder at anytime. I still have not found my pens and am beginning to suspect that the four year old has!:)

I think I may just have to go out and get another, which will guarantee that the other one will show up!:p

artdude
06-09-2002, 10:10 AM
Just thought I would relpy to this thread so it will be moved to the first page. Maybe some newbee's will find it useful :D Feel free to add any of your techiques here too :)

PS: sassybird, sue ellen...maybe a sticky on this thread??

NorahT
06-09-2002, 12:06 PM
I second the motion :D - this information is useful on an ongoing basis.

Elankat
06-09-2002, 12:08 PM
Thanks for the great examples! For beginners, I'd like to add that you are never limited to just one of these in a piece. Use all the tools you have to add dimension. :)

I second the idea of making this a sticky!

Lady Grey
06-09-2002, 02:59 PM
Thanks for help - have you thought about making an article about it ? - it would be nice
Lady Grey

artdude
06-09-2002, 07:12 PM
Originally posted by Lady Grey
Thanks for help - have you thought about making an article about it ? - it would be nice
Lady Grey

Yup...thought about an article.....hopefully soon :D

K.C.
06-09-2002, 11:47 PM
Ooo! Thanks artdude!

*picks up his pen, fumbling with it to the point he almost drops it*

prairie painter
06-10-2002, 07:59 PM
Hi! I'd really appreciate some opinions on different types of pens. I currently use
pigma micron pens, and do light washes over them or prior to the linework. I
like using really fine linework, too. The technical pens seem seem to scrape up the
watercolors and get clogged. Does anyone know of a line of permanent, disposable
ink pens that come in very fine nib sizes? Can you tell that I'm new to all this wetcanvas
site?:D
Thanks!
Mary

artdude
06-11-2002, 12:23 PM
Originally posted by Visionary
Hi! I'd really appreciate some opinions on different types of pens. I currently use
pigma micron pens, and do light washes over them or prior to the linework. I
like using really fine linework, too. The technical pens seem seem to scrape up the
watercolors and get clogged. Does anyone know of a line of permanent, disposable
ink pens that come in very fine nib sizes? Can you tell that I'm new to all this wetcanvas
site?:D
Thanks!
Mary


Hi Mary:
There is a tech pen that I have used that doesn't have a steel nib to scratch your watercolor paper. These pens are called "ZIG" Memory System Millennium. Their properties are: Pigment Ink, Acid-Free, Archival Quality, Lightfast, Waterproof, Fadeproof, Non-Bleeding. They come in a variety of sizes too. I purchased a set of five pens with these sizes of nibs: 005 (.20mm), 01 (.25mm), 03 (.35mm) 05 (.45mm), 08 (.65mm). I bought mine from a craft store but you could also try your local art supplier. Hope this has helped :D:D

PS: I think you can also get these pens in colors other than black too. :)

prairie painter
06-11-2002, 01:24 PM
I hadn't heard of that type nib- thanks for the tip! .005 is the size I most commonly
use- and, of course, that's the size that most easily clogs up.:( But the current
fad with memory albums has certainly made these pens more easily available!:clap:
I'll try to get some of my sketches up when I can figure out the scanner!

artdude
06-11-2002, 01:48 PM
Originally posted by Visionary
I hadn't heard of that type nib- thanks for the tip! .005 is the size I most commonly
use- and, of course, that's the size that most easily clogs up. But the current
fad with memory albums has certainly made these pens more easily available!
I'll try to get some of my sketches up when I can figure out the scanner!


Glad I could help :D Looking forward to seeing some of your art works. Good luck with your scanner :)

dbclemons
06-12-2002, 02:28 PM
The main problem I have with tech pens and markers is that their points aren't generally flexible enough to get a decent variety in the width of the line, compared to nibs and brushes. When shading or feathering , line width is very important. Pens and markers are also more expensive. Even so, I use them often. I prefer the darker ink quality they have. The longer the the nib, the better it works. I like layout markers, too, that have dried out. I can then use them like a brush.

As for various was of shading, the stippling technique is the hardest work. Try doing that on a large drawing and I can feel your pain. Look at the work of Virgil Finlay for prime examples of that technique.

An earlier name mentioned was Max Klinger, an excellent German draftsman and surrealist. Look here at some examples:
http://www.ku.edu/~sma/klinger/klinger.htm

-David